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Poll

What percentage of your monthly income is from microstock?

Less than 15%
34 (39.1%)
15 - 30 %
16 (18.4%)
30 - 45 %
9 (10.3%)
45 - 60%
11 (12.6%)
60 - 75%
2 (2.3%)
75 - 90%
2 (2.3%)
More than 90%
13 (14.9%)

Total Members Voted: 78

Author Topic: Part-timers: what percentage of your monthly income is from microstock?  (Read 3620 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

« on: June 02, 2014, 11:05 »
0
The categories are larger (15%) because of the variation in the income, but I'm aware this doesn't "fix" the question completely.

Just take an average of all of your months in 2014 and calculate like this. :)


Ron

« Reply #1 on: June 02, 2014, 11:36 »
0
13-15% of my net total income per month.

Goofy

« Reply #2 on: June 02, 2014, 12:16 »
0
at about 10% ...

« Reply #3 on: June 02, 2014, 19:59 »
0
about 3% but I'm a micro stock underachiever...

« Reply #4 on: June 04, 2014, 10:36 »
0
~95%

this poll doesn't seem to be very popular ...

« Reply #5 on: June 04, 2014, 10:45 »
0
~95%

this poll doesn't seem to be very popular ...

62 people voted so far.  Seems popular enough.  Also limited to part timers.  >90% doesn't seem part time, but you don't get to see results unless you vote, so maybe some full time people voted too.

« Reply #6 on: June 04, 2014, 12:08 »
+1

about 3% but I'm a micro stock underachiever...
you may just have a large salary outside of micro stock - doesn't always mean your sales aren't good :-)


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

« Reply #7 on: June 04, 2014, 12:59 »
+6
My warning to part-timers (I count myself as one, with about 50% of my income from microstock) is this:  don't give up the day job.

I once had dreams of doing exactly that.  My first 3 or 4 years were all up, up, up.  I thought I could ramp up my output and within two years be earning enough to sustain my family just on microstock income.

I followed the plan, but agencies and the rising tide of global contributors have crushed my hopes.  I'm no further ahead now than when I set up my plan a few years ago.  I feel like I've just been spinning my wheels, working more and more hours each night on this just to stay in place.

So make note of what your percentage of income comes from microstock today, and ask yourself the same question a year from now... then two, then three.   

Newbies will fill the forum with boasts of being 200% over last year or 300% over 6 months ago.  I know, I was one of those.  But after a few years, those bright-eyed new contributors so full of dreams will face the same reality the rest of us face, and they'll take our place as the grumpy veterans who moan about the good old days.

Sorry for the rant... been pretty depressed about falling numbers lately.  I'm actually hoping some veterans refute my claims of doom and gloom and tell me there is hope.  I'm just not seeing any right now.

« Reply #8 on: June 04, 2014, 13:17 »
+2
I haven't voted because my income is so sporadic it is hard to come up with hard numbers - anywhere from 30-70% probably depending on the month.  (that sounds impressive, but it is only because my other income is so low - luckily years of being homeless (mostly by choice) have honed my skills for living cheaply).

As far as doom and gloom - it is a bit depressing lately - but if you have a real job that was supporting your family and now you make 50% from microstock, that means you doubled your income, and if you stopped working, it is likely that you will continue to make a significant percent for some time (although it will taper off).

It sure would be nice if the days of uploading a mediocre picture and getting immediate sales were still going on though.

Goofy

« Reply #9 on: June 04, 2014, 13:21 »
+1
about 3% but I'm a micro stock underachiever...

aren't we all  8)



Goofy

« Reply #10 on: June 04, 2014, 13:24 »
+2
My warning to part-timers (I count myself as one, with about 50% of my income from microstock) is this:  don't give up the day job.

I once had dreams of doing exactly that.  My first 3 or 4 years were all up, up, up.  I thought I could ramp up my output and within two years be earning enough to sustain my family just on microstock income.

I followed the plan, but agencies and the rising tide of global contributors have crushed my hopes.  I'm no further ahead now than when I set up my plan a few years ago.  I feel like I've just been spinning my wheels, working more and more hours each night on this just to stay in place.

So make note of what your percentage of income comes from microstock today, and ask yourself the same question a year from now... then two, then three.   

Newbies will fill the forum with boasts of being 200% over last year or 300% over 6 months ago.  I know, I was one of those.  But after a few years, those bright-eyed new contributors so full of dreams will face the same reality the rest of us face, and they'll take our place as the grumpy veterans who moan about the good old days.

Sorry for the rant... been pretty depressed about falling numbers lately.  I'm actually hoping some veterans refute my claims of doom and gloom and tell me there is hope.  I'm just not seeing any right now.

I am looking into a mirror! Exactly what you have written is happening to me!

ethan

« Reply #11 on: June 04, 2014, 13:24 »
0
My warning to part-timers (I count myself as one, with about 50% of my income from microstock) is this:  don't give up the day job.

I once had dreams of doing exactly that.  My first 3 or 4 years were all up, up, up.  I thought I could ramp up my output and within two years be earning enough to sustain my family just on microstock income.

I followed the plan, but agencies and the rising tide of global contributors have crushed my hopes.  I'm no further ahead now than when I set up my plan a few years ago.  I feel like I've just been spinning my wheels, working more and more hours each night on this just to stay in place.

So make note of what your percentage of income comes from microstock today, and ask yourself the same question a year from now... then two, then three.   

Newbies will fill the forum with boasts of being 200% over last year or 300% over 6 months ago.  I know, I was one of those.  But after a few years, those bright-eyed new contributors so full of dreams will face the same reality the rest of us face, and they'll take our place as the grumpy veterans who moan about the good old days.

Sorry for the rant... been pretty depressed about falling numbers lately.  I'm actually hoping some veterans refute my claims of doom and gloom and tell me there is hope.  I'm just not seeing any right now.

I know what you mean :) I am lucky in the sense I have commissions/RM which make me 75-85% of my income, microstock (or penny stock) makes up the rest. I don't necessarily think it's just the newbie wannabes that are f***ing up this business, I think a large amount of blame rests on the shoulders of established part-timers that are happy to give away their images for free. They're not just gambling their own futures away but the rest of the 'stock community' as well.


EDIT: And what's worse, they have the temerity to try and justify their actions by quoting DT insiders that what their doing is good for our business  ;D

admin edit: took out the personal jab
« Last Edit: June 10, 2014, 03:53 by leaf »

donding

  • Think before you speak
« Reply #12 on: June 04, 2014, 14:47 »
+2
My warning to part-timers (I count myself as one, with about 50% of my income from microstock) is this:  don't give up the day job.

I once had dreams of doing exactly that.  My first 3 or 4 years were all up, up, up.  I thought I could ramp up my output and within two years be earning enough to sustain my family just on microstock income.

I followed the plan, but agencies and the rising tide of global contributors have crushed my hopes.  I'm no further ahead now than when I set up my plan a few years ago.  I feel like I've just been spinning my wheels, working more and more hours each night on this just to stay in place.

So make note of what your percentage of income comes from microstock today, and ask yourself the same question a year from now... then two, then three.   

Newbies will fill the forum with boasts of being 200% over last year or 300% over 6 months ago.  I know, I was one of those.  But after a few years, those bright-eyed new contributors so full of dreams will face the same reality the rest of us face, and they'll take our place as the grumpy veterans who moan about the good old days.

Sorry for the rant... been pretty depressed about falling numbers lately.  I'm actually hoping some veterans refute my claims of doom and gloom and tell me there is hope.  I'm just not seeing any right now.

A big dream for newcomers. I personally think between the cheep prices and the lower commissions and the over saturated market, it would be very difficult to make a living in microstock as a newcomer unless you found a niche market and were a super fantastic photographer. It's just not there anymore in my opinion.

ethan

« Reply #13 on: June 04, 2014, 15:10 »
-2
-2 LOL

Guess Who :)
« Last Edit: June 04, 2014, 16:11 by ethan »

« Reply #14 on: June 04, 2014, 15:11 »
0
Wasn't it decided not to call other members out by name?  Posting initials is almost the same. 

I don't agree with how everyone in this business runs their business.  Not at all.  I think big factories uploading thousands of images a month have hurt small fry people like me and even themselves.  But please tell me how blame and shame will fix that?

ethan

« Reply #15 on: June 04, 2014, 15:22 »
0
Wasn't it decided not to call other members out by name?  Posting initials is almost the same. 

I don't agree with how everyone in this business runs their business.  Not at all.  I think big factories uploading thousands of images a month have hurt small fry people like me and even themselves.  But please tell me how blame and shame will fix that?

I would like to agree, but there comes a point where we need to stand together against the tyranny of 'some' sites (like FT and DT) and make a collective stance as a group of determined stock artists. The initials of the folks I mention are both very well known for their 'peculiar' judgements so I don't think anyone would be surprised at their collective stance in giving away images for free that damage all of us trying to make a living in this business.

« Reply #16 on: June 04, 2014, 15:37 »
+1
My warning to part-timers (I count myself as one, with about 50% of my income from microstock) is this:  don't give up the day job.

I once had dreams of doing exactly that.  My first 3 or 4 years were all up, up, up.  I thought I could ramp up my output and within two years be earning enough to sustain my family just on microstock income.

I followed the plan, but agencies and the rising tide of global contributors have crushed my hopes.  I'm no further ahead now than when I set up my plan a few years ago.  I feel like I've just been spinning my wheels, working more and more hours each night on this just to stay in place.

So make note of what your percentage of income comes from microstock today, and ask yourself the same question a year from now... then two, then three.   

Newbies will fill the forum with boasts of being 200% over last year or 300% over 6 months ago.  I know, I was one of those.  But after a few years, those bright-eyed new contributors so full of dreams will face the same reality the rest of us face, and they'll take our place as the grumpy veterans who moan about the good old days.

Sorry for the rant... been pretty depressed about falling numbers lately.  I'm actually hoping some veterans refute my claims of doom and gloom and tell me there is hope.  I'm just not seeing any right now.

After 5 years I saw the wall.  Last year my return per upload dropped 20%.  Growing the portfolio 25% off set that in a tread mill kind of way.  This year I'm deleting one upload for every two that get selected.  I've read the threads that say never delete anything... they may sell some day... but reality is poorly selling images at crappy selling sites are a waste of effort (do I really need 16 agencies?).  My return per upload stat has stabilized... the compulsive editor inside me is enjoying himself... and things are slowly growing.  Make the art you want to make (and yes keep the day job).     



Harvepino

« Reply #17 on: June 04, 2014, 16:27 »
0
My warning to part-timers (I count myself as one, with about 50% of my income from microstock) is this:  don't give up the day job.

In contrast, I did this two years ago... I wouldn't do it if I had a family, but I was single, so I risked it. Starting from zero, in 30 months I am now earning my living from microstock. I am not high earner by any kind, but I do earn more than average salary in country where I live. It is hard work, but it is still possible to start living from microstock, even these days... probably lot harder than in golden ages, but still possible.  :)

donding

  • Think before you speak
« Reply #18 on: June 04, 2014, 16:39 »
0
My warning to part-timers (I count myself as one, with about 50% of my income from microstock) is this:  don't give up the day job.

In contrast, I did this two years ago... I wouldn't do it if I had a family, but I was single, so I risked it. Starting from zero, in 30 months I am now earning my living from microstock. I am not high earner by any kind, but I do earn more than average salary in country where I live. It is hard work, but it is still possible to start living from microstock, even these days... probably lot harder than in golden ages, but still possible.  :)

You bring up a good point. A lot depends on where and what country you live in. Even differnt areas of the United States have lower cost of living.

PaulieWalnuts

  • On the Wrong Side of the Business
« Reply #19 on: June 04, 2014, 16:46 »
+4
My warning to part-timers (I count myself as one, with about 50% of my income from microstock) is this:  don't give up the day job.

I once had dreams of doing exactly that.  My first 3 or 4 years were all up, up, up.  I thought I could ramp up my output and within two years be earning enough to sustain my family just on microstock income.

I followed the plan, but agencies and the rising tide of global contributors have crushed my hopes.  I'm no further ahead now than when I set up my plan a few years ago.  I feel like I've just been spinning my wheels, working more and more hours each night on this just to stay in place.

So make note of what your percentage of income comes from microstock today, and ask yourself the same question a year from now... then two, then three.   

Newbies will fill the forum with boasts of being 200% over last year or 300% over 6 months ago.  I know, I was one of those.  But after a few years, those bright-eyed new contributors so full of dreams will face the same reality the rest of us face, and they'll take our place as the grumpy veterans who moan about the good old days.

Sorry for the rant... been pretty depressed about falling numbers lately.  I'm actually hoping some veterans refute my claims of doom and gloom and tell me there is hope.  I'm just not seeing any right now.

Newbies post stuff like 200-300% gains because it's not difficult to double or triple your income when you have a couple dozen images and are making $10 per month. The problem is when you need to go from 5,000 to 10,000 images in a year to make the same you did the year before or see a small increase. Seems like the wall eventually happens to just about everybody no matter how good your work is or how many images you make.

I've been at this since 2007 and started focusing on other photography income a couple years ago. Glad I did. The only thing part time about this is the money. It's a full time job with part time pay.


 

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