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Author Topic: Outdoor shots- Lighting Requirements  (Read 3435 times)

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tab62

« on: September 20, 2012, 09:12 »
0
Hi MSG Folks,

For taking shots of people outdoors do the majority of the shots requirement bringing out your strobes/speedlights? I just had an MS company reject my outdoor shots of my model working in the corn fields due to 'poor lighting'. I took the photos about one hour before sunset to get the golden color and reduce any harsh shadows. I prefer natural lighting..


T


digitalexpressionimages

« Reply #1 on: September 20, 2012, 09:18 »
0
Hi MSG Folks,

For taking shots of people outdoors do the majority of the shots requirement bringing out your strobes/speedlights? I just had an MS company reject my outdoor shots of my model working in the corn fields due to 'poor lighting'. I took the photos about one hour before sunset to get the golden color and reduce any harsh shadows. I prefer natural lighting..


T

Reviewers are funny. When you shoot at golden hour you get golden light. Duh right? Some reviewers flag that as a white balance problem because whites aren't white. You also tend to get long and dramatic shadows which is usually very pretty and artistic but then a reviewer will say poor lighting because of the shadows which they don't seem to like. Trying to be artistic in stock photography is hit and miss.

I usually shoot with two 42 inch reflectors outdoors. One I will use as a diffuser and the other as a fill light.

« Reply #2 on: September 20, 2012, 09:41 »
0
Hi MSG Folks,

For taking shots of people outdoors do the majority of the shots requirement bringing out your strobes/speedlights? I just had an MS company reject my outdoor shots of my model working in the corn fields due to 'poor lighting'. I took the photos about one hour before sunset to get the golden color and reduce any harsh shadows. I prefer natural lighting..

T

Thread is useless without images :).  If you're going to discuss "poor lighting" we certainly can't talk without seeing the issue.

tab62

« Reply #3 on: September 20, 2012, 09:48 »
0
Agree- I will post two pics later today...

« Reply #4 on: September 20, 2012, 10:04 »
0
For outdoor models I shoot in late day light or with light filtered through trees. The ambient light is back-lighting the model. Then use strobes to fill the subject. The larger the soft box the better. Balance the strobe-to-the-ambient to taste. Rinse and repeat.  8)

Good stuff here
http://strobist.blogspot.com/2006/02/welcome-to-strobist.html

Good shooting

OX
...spreading good karma

tab62

« Reply #5 on: September 20, 2012, 10:08 »
0
Good stuff- The stock editor told me that the shadows are too harsh thus your on the mark with the soft boxes. The editor mention about shooting on cloudy days as well to defused the lighting as well...

« Reply #6 on: September 20, 2012, 11:26 »
0
shooting on cloudy days will probably get you a poor lighting rejection due to flat lighting.

I've used a single off-camera flash with umbrella successfully outdoors as well as my studio strobes with umbrellas. Much as Oxman described with the model in the shade so the sun lights the background and you have full control over the foreground lighting. I don't normally get lighting rejections when I use flash but often when I use natural lighting. Fortunately, Alamy isn't nearly as picky on "real world" shots so it isn't a total waste of time.

« Reply #7 on: September 20, 2012, 11:28 »
+2
I guess this isn't a stock thing, but my complaint with with natural light is that dead look in the model's eyes if there is no light source creating nice catchlights and brightening up the eye colour.

tab62

« Reply #8 on: September 20, 2012, 12:33 »
0
Good comment on the catch lights!

lisafx

« Reply #9 on: September 20, 2012, 15:47 »
+1
FWIW, my outdoor shots were all done with only fill flash or a reflector.  I have a large 5 in 1 reflector that also has an opaque panel to diffuse the light.  If you understand light you can get great outdoor shots with only a minimum of equipment. 

« Reply #10 on: September 20, 2012, 15:56 »
+1
You'll for sure need something to control the light.  Sometimes you'll get lucky and find a nice spot but generally you need more help with lighting.  I use a reflector a lot (worth every penny).  They are cheap, indestructible, light, don't use batteries and look great.  I also have a battery powered hensel strobe I take to most shoots but if the sun is out you can often play around and get similar results with a reflector.

tab62

« Reply #11 on: September 20, 2012, 16:24 »
0
thank you all! :D


« Reply #12 on: September 20, 2012, 16:25 »
0
You'll for sure need something to control the light.  Sometimes you'll get lucky and find a nice spot but generally you need more help with lighting.  I use a reflector a lot (worth every penny).  They are cheap, indestructible, light, don't use batteries and look great.  I also have a battery powered hensel strobe I take to most shoots but if the sun is out you can often play around and get similar results with a reflector.

Yep reflectors have their advantages but for racing a fading light I find you can squeeze out more shots with a controllable big azz strobe and battery pack. Reflectors require someone to hold it the same way but then they don't blow over and smack your freaking PB Einstein into the dirt from 7 feet high -- like i did yesterday  :o


 

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