pancakes

MicrostockGroup Sponsors


Author Topic: Photographer killed by locomotive traveling from opposite direction  (Read 4729 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Poncke

« on: December 11, 2012, 09:57 »
0
A female Photographer got killed by locomotive traveling from opposite direction when she was taking photos on a train track.

http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/calif-teacher-killed-train-photos-article-1.1217517?localLinksEnabled=false

She is also nominated for a Darwin Award

http://www.petapixel.com/2012/12/11/photographer-killed-while-taking-pictures-of-an-oncoming-train/

What are your thoughts? Was she not careful enough,  stupid to be there or just plain bad luck?

Some comments were quite harsh

Quote
why on earth was she standing between two tracks long enough to get hit. Get hit that means she stood there as a conductor saw her standing in deaths way, had to have blown his horn multiple times but there she stood. She wasnt hit by a train she made a train conductor run her over probably because she thought her art was worth the risk.


She should have heard the train coming, but I guess when you are very concentrated you miss out on whats going on around you. I think its a case of bad luck and being in the wrong place at the wrong time.

My thoughts go out to her friends family and school children for their terrible loss.


« Reply #1 on: December 11, 2012, 10:25 »
0
There are a lot of factors that could have contributed to this tragedy. I've taken a lot of train/railway shots standing on the tracks. Sound can be deceiving and the direction it's coming from. Speed too. When you face a train head on its much more difficult to judge the speed until it's passing you. She may have been aware of the train behind her but her focus was on the train in front of her. A quick look over the shoulder and she could have  assumed she had more time.  Always treat trains with the utmost respect and caution especially when dealing with double/triple tracks.

« Reply #2 on: December 11, 2012, 10:31 »
0
I have no sympathy with people who deliberately put themselves into life threatening situations involving innocent people who will be scarred for life.

If you must take pictures on railroad tracks to get this one shot you believe is going to make you world famous (what other reason is there to stand on rail tracks...?) then take a couple of assistants with you that check each direction of the tracks AT ALL TIMES.

Don't forget it's also your life that you are endangering, it may be worth having at least one person "look out" for you.

As a parent what would you tell your kid if you find it standing on the railroad tracks or in the middle of an intersection?

« Last Edit: December 11, 2012, 10:35 by click_click »

rubyroo

« Reply #3 on: December 11, 2012, 10:40 »
+1
Do people seriously put up things like this for Darwin awards?  I can only imagine they've never suffered a bereavement.  How on earth must her family and loved ones be feeling to have their grief compounded by such callousness? 

« Reply #4 on: December 11, 2012, 10:59 »
0
Was she nominated for a Darwin award or is it just somebody saying she should get one?  The Darwin awards are usually a bit more spectacularly stupid than that.

« Reply #5 on: December 11, 2012, 11:08 »
0
Do people seriously put up things like this for Darwin awards?  I can only imagine they've never suffered a bereavement.  How on earth must her family and loved ones be feeling to have their grief compounded by such callousness?
Getting hit by car whilst standing on the sidewalk having a chat is tragic accident.

Consciously walking/standing on, close to or between railroad tracks is 100% stupidity.

This has nothing to do with callousness. The teacher walked on the tracks fully aware of what she was doing, there is no excuse.

Trains are heavy machines that travel at high speeds and cannot stop immediately.

Every sensible parent tells their kids not to go near railroad tracks or stand in the street. It is just common sense.

This is not directed at you Ruby, but there are people out there that believe that the conductor should have done this or blown the horn or slowed down the train or whatever else. Nonetheless, the teacher was NOT supposed to be on the tracks.

The teacher (plus all suicidal persons walking on tracks) many times don't even consider the danger of hurting other people physically and mentally (family members, conductors, passengers, rescue personnel etc.). That on top is very careless behavior in my book.

People should really use their brains more before they go out and do things.

There is a reason why everyone is being told: Stay off the tracks.

How hard can it be?

EmberMike

« Reply #6 on: December 11, 2012, 11:11 »
0
I have no sympathy with people who deliberately put themselves into life threatening situations involving innocent people who will be scarred for life...

I agree. I have sympathy for her husband and 3 kids, and of course wish she were still around, at the very least for her family. But I have a hard time feeling sympathetic towards her specifically when she was reckless and foolish. Especially because she was a mother. How selfish to put herself needlessly in harms way and for something as trivial as a photo. All that risk, leaving her kids and husband behind, just to get the shot. That's the saddest part of this.



EmberMike

« Reply #7 on: December 11, 2012, 11:14 »
0
...There is a reason why everyone is being told: Stay off the tracks.

How hard can it be?

Right. It's something we are taught as children. "Look both ways before crossing the street." "Don't stand on train tracks."

Both of those things still apply as adults. Who would just blindly walk across a busy street? I guess the same person who would stand on train tracks.

« Reply #8 on: December 11, 2012, 11:24 »
+3
I think it is not appropriate to discuss this sort of thing.

First we do not know what happened
Second we (hopefully) do not know the person
Anyones death is serious and should not be ridiculed on internet forums.

My best wishes to her family and those who knew her.

« Reply #9 on: December 11, 2012, 11:26 »
0
I've often wondered why so many photographers take clients to the local railway tracks for the classic "family walking away holding hands along the tracks" shot.  If the tracks are no longer used, that's one thing (although even this flies in the face of teaching kids to stay away from train tracks).  But why take clients (with KIDS) to tracks that are still used?  The more people involved in the shot, the more time the shot will take, and the longer it will take to get everyone moved if a train does come.

« Reply #10 on: December 11, 2012, 11:38 »
0
I've often wondered why so many photographers take clients to the local railway tracks for the classic "family walking away holding hands along the tracks" shot.  If the tracks are no longer used, that's one thing (although even this flies in the face of teaching kids to stay away from train tracks).  But why take clients (with KIDS) to tracks that are still used?  The more people involved in the shot, the more time the shot will take, and the longer it will take to get everyone moved if a train does come.
I agree 100%.

EmberMike

« Reply #11 on: December 11, 2012, 11:42 »
0
I think it is not appropriate to discuss this sort of thing.

First we do not know what happened
Second we (hopefully) do not know the person
Anyones death is serious and should not be ridiculed on internet forums.

My best wishes to her family and those who knew her.

Of course it is serious, which is exactly why it should be discussed. Obviously some people are still unaware that train tracks are dangerous, despite us all being taught this as children. Hopefully this serves as a cautionary tale for some.

And we do know what happened. We know exactly what happened, and we know that this could have easily been avoided. It's a senseless death, serious as any other but possibly even more disturbing due to the fact that this mother of 3 ignored common sense and needlessly put herself in harms way.

ruxpriencdiam

    This user is banned.
  • Location. Third stone from the sun
« Reply #12 on: December 11, 2012, 11:55 »
0
Well I have yet to read all the post's but let me say that having lived in NY i have played on the tracks many a day as well as having hitched a ride on many a boxcar.

Knowing it was Illegal to be on the tracks and that we kids could be killed but hey we were invincible.

So any grown up on the tracks in NY or anywhere else for that matter if they dont know it yet besides watching your back and knowing when a train is coming you better watch out for the Law you can be arrested and the tracks have their own police as well as local, state and federal.

So be carefull and good luck.

Happy reading.

http://www.fra.dot.gov/downloads/safety/cross_chp9.pdf  RR Track laws for all 50 states


« Reply #13 on: December 11, 2012, 12:02 »
0
I think it is not appropriate to discuss this sort of thing.
With all due respect, this may be your ethical viewpoint. As long as I'm not infringing any forum rules, I was under the impression we can discuss anything.

Quote
First we do not know what happened
We know what happened: The teacher was hit by a train because she broke the law. This happens when people walk on train tracks or right next to them as trains only travel on train tracks. She didn't walk on the sidewalk, in a parking lot or a park. Sorry to be so blunt.

Quote
Second we (hopefully) do not know the person
Anyone's death is serious and should not be ridiculed on internet forums.
This didn't happen within the confines of someone's home. This happened on (most likely) public property and will be (and has been) covered by the local media as well. This is reality, which happens every day multiple times across the nation. People love to look away from this incidents and try to ignore them as if they don't happen.

People have to be informed about the risks and dangers of our daily lives and why rules and laws are in place to protect every one of us. The teacher deliberately placed herself in harms way for a photo and now we see the result of her actions.

Nobody here has been ridiculing the victim or the family. I feel sorry for the family especially the kids.

We all have to take responsibility for our actions. As mentioned before, her, being a daughter, mother, wife and friend of many I cannot grasp the desire to place myself on train tracks, especially when there is already a train traveling next to the track I'm standing on. 

Let's put it this way: It wasn't a smart idea to take images on the tracks.
« Last Edit: December 11, 2012, 12:09 by click_click »

Microbius

« Reply #14 on: December 11, 2012, 12:08 »
+2
It was stupid. But all of us sometimes do stupid or careless things. Shame when it results in a tragic death. My thoughts go out to her family and friends.

« Reply #15 on: December 11, 2012, 12:37 »
+2
I think it is not appropriate to discuss this sort of thing.
With all due respect, this may be your ethical viewpoint. As long as I'm not infringing any forum rules, I was under the impression we can discuss anything.

Quote
First we do not know what happened
We know what happened: The teacher was hit by a train because she broke the law. This happens when people walk on train tracks or right next to them as trains only travel on train tracks. She didn't walk on the sidewalk, in a parking lot or a park. Sorry to be so blunt.

Quote
Second we (hopefully) do not know the person
Anyone's death is serious and should not be ridiculed on internet forums.
This didn't happen within the confines of someone's home. This happened on (most likely) public property and will be (and has been) covered by the local media as well. This is reality, which happens every day multiple times across the nation. People love to look away from this incidents and try to ignore them as if they don't happen.

People have to be informed about the risks and dangers of our daily lives and why rules and laws are in place to protect every one of us. The teacher deliberately placed herself in harms way for a photo and now we see the result of her actions.

Nobody here has been ridiculing the victim or the family. I feel sorry for the family especially the kids.

We all have to take responsibility for our actions. As mentioned before, her, being a daughter, mother, wife and friend of many I cannot grasp the desire to place myself on train tracks, especially when there is already a train traveling next to the track I'm standing on. 

Let's put it this way: It wasn't a smart idea to take images on the tracks.

all what you say is correct, we should discuss things.
Just in a general way, not with mentioning people.
The net never forgets, and it is not nice for her children to find this thread in 10 years time.
I think the moderator should remove it.
« Last Edit: December 11, 2012, 12:41 by JPSDK »

« Reply #16 on: December 11, 2012, 12:40 »
0
I don't think it's 100% stupidity. It is very hard for humans to detect the direction of the sound. If she heard the sound and saw the train in front of her, she clearly attributed that sound to the train she saw, and probably thought she has more than enough time to get out of the way. That's the tragic mistake part. However, being on the track alone and not having anyone with you to watch your back is stupid. I never step out on the road without somebody watching for me in both directions. And even if you absolutely have to do it for some reason, consider all possibilities first, like a train coming in opposite direction, and take appropriate safety measures. So I think this one is not "stupid" or "tragic", it's a bit of both... like most things in life.


« Reply #17 on: December 11, 2012, 12:55 »
0
I think it is not appropriate to discuss this sort of thing.
With all due respect, this may be your ethical viewpoint. As long as I'm not infringing any forum rules, I was under the impression we can discuss anything.

Quote
First we do not know what happened
We know what happened: The teacher was hit by a train because she broke the law. This happens when people walk on train tracks or right next to them as trains only travel on train tracks. She didn't walk on the sidewalk, in a parking lot or a park. Sorry to be so blunt.

Quote
Second we (hopefully) do not know the person
Anyone's death is serious and should not be ridiculed on internet forums.
This didn't happen within the confines of someone's home. This happened on (most likely) public property and will be (and has been) covered by the local media as well. This is reality, which happens every day multiple times across the nation. People love to look away from this incidents and try to ignore them as if they don't happen.

People have to be informed about the risks and dangers of our daily lives and why rules and laws are in place to protect every one of us. The teacher deliberately placed herself in harms way for a photo and now we see the result of her actions.

Nobody here has been ridiculing the victim or the family. I feel sorry for the family especially the kids.

We all have to take responsibility for our actions. As mentioned before, her, being a daughter, mother, wife and friend of many I cannot grasp the desire to place myself on train tracks, especially when there is already a train traveling next to the track I'm standing on. 

Let's put it this way: It wasn't a smart idea to take images on the tracks.

all what you say is correct, we should discuss things.
Just in a general way, not with mentioning people.
The net never forgets, and it is not nice for her children to find this thread in 10 years time.
I think the moderator should remove it.
Better close the entire internet then, as I'm sure this is just one of many discussions about this incident.

Poncke

« Reply #18 on: December 11, 2012, 12:59 »
0
Why remove it? Its a discussion on a public forum with only back links to the news article.

Anyway, I am surprised reading some of the comments. But I understand what people are saying.

« Reply #19 on: December 11, 2012, 12:59 »
+1
no need to turn off the internet, pretty much the people opening these kind of tragic stories should take away the comment option, of course if they turn out this way :(

« Reply #20 on: December 11, 2012, 13:18 »
0
no need to turn off the internet, pretty much the people opening these kind of tragic stories should take away the comment option, of course if they turn out this way :(
Why? How did this one turn out?

« Reply #21 on: December 11, 2012, 13:26 »
0
no need to turn off the internet, pretty much the people opening these kind of tragic stories should take away the comment option, of course if they turn out this way :(
Why? How did this one turn out?

I am talking about the comments on the news site not here

« Reply #22 on: December 11, 2012, 14:00 »
+3
What risks HAVE WE ALL TAKEN to get that special shot? Many times your composition is unique because you captured a unique perspective that may, at times, involve risk. Forget train tracks for a moment. Have none of you never ventured slightly beyond the boundaries to capture that special shot? That's the nature of photography - ask any photographer on assignment for National Geographics or shooting for the NYT in Syria. Extreme examples perhaps but my point is there are times when risk is part of that special composition that separates you from everyone else. If you can do it with 100% security. Great. But that is rarely the case.

Poncke

« Reply #23 on: December 11, 2012, 14:24 »
0
What risks HAVE WE ALL TAKEN to get that special shot? Many times your composition is unique because you captured a unique perspective that may, at times, involve risk. Forget train tracks for a moment. Have none of you never ventured slightly beyond the boundaries to capture that special shot? That's the nature of photography - ask any photographer on assignment for National Geographics or shooting for the NYT in Syria. Extreme examples perhaps but my point is there are times when risk is part of that special composition that separates you from everyone else. If you can do it with 100% security. Great. But that is rarely the case.
good post, agree

« Reply #24 on: December 11, 2012, 14:51 »
0
What risks HAVE WE ALL TAKEN to get that special shot? Many times your composition is unique because you captured a unique perspective that may, at times, involve risk. Forget train tracks for a moment. Have none of you never ventured slightly beyond the boundaries to capture that special shot? That's the nature of photography - ask any photographer on assignment for National Geographics or shooting for the NYT in Syria. Extreme examples perhaps but my point is there are times when risk is part of that special composition that separates you from everyone else. If you can do it with 100% security. Great. But that is rarely the case.
Yes, we all take risks. And as a photographer we take greater risks to get more special images.

However, certain risks can be assessed, calculated and minimized. You can be smart about it and do it a professional way or you do it cheap and sloppy and might get hurt.

Shooting photos alone in a dangerous environment can lead to serious consequences. It only would have (most likely) required one more person to watch out for her.

However, there is a difference between this case and the comparison to war journalists who knowingly go into highly dangerous territory in order to make a living.

RacePhoto

« Reply #25 on: December 12, 2012, 01:06 »
0
As someone who still takes train photos let me say. Stupid!

You can't hear a train coming up behind you at 60-80MPH, you don't stand on the freeway to shoot the other lanes. Why would someone stand in the path of a train going the same speed?

You NEVER stand between the rails, especially while looking the other direction.

ruxpriencdiam

    This user is banned.
  • Location. Third stone from the sun
« Reply #26 on: December 12, 2012, 14:36 »
0
Ear buds!

As someone who still takes train photos let me say. Stupid!

You can't hear a train coming up behind you at 60-80MPH, you don't stand on the freeway to shoot the other lanes. Why would someone stand in the path of a train going the same speed?

You NEVER stand between the rails, especially while looking the other direction.


« Reply #27 on: December 12, 2012, 17:08 »
0
Without seeing the area where she was photographing when she was killed, then it's hard to pass judgment.  I have seen some train tracks where there are blind curves... areas covered by thick vegetation in which the train seems to practically appear out of nowhere.

At any rate, whether photographing trains or highway traffic... one has to always exercise a high degree of caution.  Highways are especially dangerous, just because you get a lot of idiot drivers who rubber neck at what you're are doing.... and where ever their head swivels, their car seems to go in that direction too, lol.

Cricket
« Last Edit: December 12, 2012, 17:12 by Cricket »

rubyroo

« Reply #28 on: December 12, 2012, 18:16 »
+1
I agree with Luis and Jens.  I don't think comments sections should be permitted on articles like that.  So many people just want to spew their opinions all over the Internet without a thought for the hurt they cause.  It makes no sense to be shouting at a dead person because of the pain she's caused her children and loved ones while those very comments sit for posterity to cause even more pain for them.

Poncke

« Reply #29 on: December 12, 2012, 18:20 »
0
I think its nonsense to remove freedom of speech, spoken or written, makes no difference. Discussing a matter doesnt necessarily cause grief either.

rubyroo

« Reply #30 on: December 12, 2012, 18:22 »
0
I don't think it removes freedom of speech.  Newspapers often choose not to place comment sections under sensitive subjects.  It's more a judgement call than anything.  Different people have different sensitivities.

Poncke

« Reply #31 on: December 12, 2012, 18:29 »
0
Fair enough on news articles, I meant in general including blogs and forums

rubyroo

« Reply #32 on: December 12, 2012, 18:32 »
0
Yes, sorry if I wasn't clear.  I meant on news articles specifically.

« Reply #33 on: December 13, 2012, 03:31 »
+2
there is always a line of so called freedom..and many people are claiming freedom to do things that hurt others...

i remember a quote like a lot of bad things are going on in the disguise of freedom..personally i will think what is your freedom of speech to say something about a person that had passed away and u have never met, and u weren't there..and u don't know what exactly happened except..an article.

I think its nonsense to remove freedom of speech, spoken or written, makes no difference. Discussing a matter doesnt necessarily cause grief either.

Poncke

« Reply #34 on: December 13, 2012, 13:00 »
0
Ugh, you are taking this out of context. There is nothing wrong with discussing the news. I dont even know how to defend myself against that comment. I'll leave it at that.


 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
10 Replies
6207 Views
Last post February 04, 2008, 13:00
by strikerx98
1 Replies
2284 Views
Last post May 05, 2008, 10:16
by Read_My_Rights
14 Replies
3695 Views
Last post July 09, 2009, 17:56
by PixelBytes
27 Replies
5325 Views
Last post August 15, 2009, 11:07
by stokfoto
36 Replies
7381 Views
Last post April 07, 2016, 03:48
by Firewall

Sponsors

Microstock Poll Results