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Author Topic: Differences between midstock and microstock RF License  (Read 6052 times)

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« on: August 04, 2009, 13:10 »
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Question is:

Why to pay  20$ per a picture instead of 2$, and what it is worth about 10x cost of image with mid RF license?

Or,

what costumer get more with "midRF" licence?

We saw today new premium collection on Cutcaster "Betta than Vetta", something like IS's "Vetta" but different type of licence...

Very confusing...
« Last Edit: August 04, 2009, 13:48 by borg »


« Reply #1 on: August 04, 2009, 13:27 »
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I think the real question is: why are our images being sold for $2 when buyers seem to be willing to pay $20

« Reply #2 on: August 04, 2009, 15:48 »
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I think the real question is: why are our images being sold for $2 when buyers seem to be willing to pay $20

A good question indeed.
It should be a supply and demand thing.
Hundreds of shots available of an apple isolated on white.... that of course should be a $2 shot.
Multiple models, professional make-up, expensive/exotic location etc, etc, needs to be a $20 or more image. 

« Reply #3 on: August 05, 2009, 03:44 »
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Because we do allow microstock companies to do that and do not value our own work, thats why. Even $20 is pretty cheap in most cases...

« Reply #4 on: August 05, 2009, 07:30 »
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Question is:

Why to pay  20$ per a picture instead of 2$, and what it is worth about 10x cost of image with mid RF license?


Because:
  • customer does only know the place where the price is 20$
  • doesn't want to spend the time searching multiple sites
  • gets (perceives to get) a better customer service
  • thinks 20$ is cheap compared to the 200$ he used to pay and doesn't look any further

I think it has got nothing to do with what you get, but with marketing. I doubt that many buyers have a deeper knowledge about the variety of stock sites out there in the web...

michealo

« Reply #5 on: August 05, 2009, 07:45 »
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I think the real question is: why are our images being sold for $2 when buyers seem to be willing to pay $20

I think because price is what you pay and value is what you get.

Take for example you want a designer jumper

you can buy it for $200 in a couple of minutes or spend weeks looking in charity / thrift shops trying to find something similar

it depends on the balance between how time poor and how poor you are ...

« Reply #6 on: August 06, 2009, 18:52 »
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Why does it always come down to complaining rather than answering a legitimate question? I would also like to know the usage differences...

« Reply #7 on: August 06, 2009, 19:42 »
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Why does it always come down to complaining rather than answering a legitimate question? I would also like to know the usage differences...

Agree - there is an abundance of complaining around here lately.  Yawn.

As for usage differences, best way to find that out is to read the license terms on the various sites.

« Reply #8 on: August 06, 2009, 20:31 »
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There has been such a catastrophic explosion in both the supply and the demand for images (the latter being primarily fueled by low prices) over the last few years that the market has yet to find it's level.

As Ron Chappel (Iophoto) observed a while back, in the future there won't be 'micro' and 'macro' stock __ just 'stock'. It is pretty obvious when you think about it.

With the market in such disarray I'm not sure that there's that much value in comparing the minutiae of licencing models unless you happen to be a buyer right now with a specific need.

Micro prices are rising and macro prices are dropping. Give it another 5-10 years at most and the terms micro and macro will probably become largely meaningless other than for very high-end or specialist agencies.

« Reply #9 on: August 07, 2009, 04:55 »
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I think the real question is: why are our images being sold for $2 when buyers seem to be willing to pay $20

A good question indeed.
It should be a supply and demand thing.
Hundreds of shots available of an apple isolated on white.... that of course should be a $2 shot.
Multiple models, professional make-up, expensive/exotic location etc, etc, needs to be a $20 or more image. 

Sorry, but this statement does not make sense. It is obvious that there is (more then) enough supply of high quality 'multiple models, professional make-up...' photograps being supplied to agencies selling for these low prices. Hence the rule of supply/demand seems to be exactly what's causing the low price.


If it was not the case, the same rule would likely force to agencies to offer better deals for some specific higher cost imagery.

« Reply #10 on: August 07, 2009, 06:37 »
0

Question is:

Why to pay  20$ per a picture instead of 2$, and what it is worth about 10x cost of image with mid RF license?
Or,
what costumer get more with "midRF" licence?

We saw today new premium collection on Cutcaster "Betta than Vetta", something like IS's "Vetta" but different type of licence...

Very confusing...

There are several answers, the 2$ RF image from microstock is not a 'free for all uses' and has licence limitations for use, these limitations can be lifted by the purchase of an extended licence which will bring it closer to a 20$ midstock image.

Most images in these collections and on dedicated midstock or macrostock websites are just not available in the microstock libraries for $2, the type of customer and the expectations of buyers are often different, there are cases where a Photographer will upload the same images to all libraries.

Some buyers will only shop with midstock or macrostock websites, the good thing about these midstock collections on the microstock websites is that buyers might not shop round trying to find the same image cheaper if they know that the images are not available in the general microstock library.

For a buyer the 'best fit' of an image to the end clients requirement is the real driver, if this image comes at $2 and not $20, it is just a bonus for the buyer as they would have paid $20 for the right image.

David  ;)  

« Reply #11 on: August 07, 2009, 07:35 »
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Ok.

We are still without strict conclusion, but thanks for comment anyway...  :P
 
Another direct question:

What is different between "micro RF EL" and "mid RF (no EL)"...!?

Similar price but...
I am asking because midstock also have EL...

???
« Last Edit: August 07, 2009, 07:36 by borg »


 

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