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Author Topic: Strange Email about My Image  (Read 6174 times)

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« Reply #50 on: November 30, 2016, 16:49 »
+3
Probably a scam, but to what end on their end? Take down a pic? For what? Why?
n email
I suspect it will be followed by a nasty attachment in a that might cause all sorts of problems.
This will be the response when "proof" is requested is my guess. Nasty scam!


« Reply #51 on: November 30, 2016, 18:11 »
+2
This is fishy...
If they were  serious and this was legit, you would have received some note from a take down notice from a lawyer or  communications from FAA or Shutterstock.

So, two days taking action...maybe that's the scam...they will send some court scam email asking you to pay money.

In any case, if you received their email, try to find out where the IP originated from. Maybe from some third world country. Bellow is how:

http://www.online-tech-tips.com/computer-tips/how-to-track-the-original-location-of-an-email-via-its-ip-address/

http://lifehacker.com/how-can-i-find-out-where-an-email-really-came-from-1190061668


angelawaye

  • Eat, Sleep, Keyword. Repeat

« Reply #52 on: November 30, 2016, 19:12 »
0
The IP address from the email from donotreply@fineartamerica's is: 207.150.192.50

It says Austin, Texas.

The IP address from the hotmail account is: 65.55.116.12

It says Virginia, Washington

So now I'm really worried...

steheap

  • Author of best selling "Get Started in Stock"

« Reply #53 on: November 30, 2016, 19:59 »
+15
Angela

For goodness sake - forget this. Forget their email address and its IP, forget the claim, forget this thread. No-one is going to sue you - it costs a fortune and what damages would they expect to get if they even attempted it and were successful - nothing!

Get back to normal life.

Steve

« Reply #54 on: November 30, 2016, 20:35 »
+1
Angela

For goodness sake - forget this. Forget their email address and its IP, forget the claim, forget this thread. No-one is going to sue you - it costs a fortune and what damages would they expect to get if they even attempted it and were successful - nothing!

Get back to normal life.

Steve

Yes. This is nothing, and you are getting worked up over something you should totally ignore and never think about again.

« Reply #55 on: November 30, 2016, 20:40 »
+2
I agree, this is a scam, please forget about it.

When I said you should deny all allegations and reserve the right to countersue, it doesn't mean you need a lawyer at all.

This is a standard reply to protect yourself. No lawyer needed.

If they had anything on you, you would have received something with substance by now and they would have identified themselves properly. Not doing that, puts them into a weak position if there ever was a court case.

Please ignore it all, relax and enjoy the holidays.

« Reply #56 on: November 30, 2016, 20:56 »
+1
If you are in the US, many police departments take reports of internet and phone frauds.  You could also report it to police, at least the ones who pay attention to cyber crimes.

« Reply #57 on: December 01, 2016, 01:00 »
+2
The IP address from the email from donotreply@fineartamerica's is: 207.150.192.50

It says Austin, Texas.

The IP address from the hotmail account is: 65.55.116.12

It says Virginia, Washington

So now I'm really worried...


Proxy web sites / VPN / other tools can be used to send email from any server and any location of world. People often used these technique to visit banned website, hide their original IP, anonymous surfing etc.

As Steve and others already said, ignore and forget it. I have seen your image that is nothing wrong with it. 


How to recognize scams
Scams can contain the following:
1    Alarmist messages and threats of account closures.
2    Promises of money for little or no effort.
3    Deals that sound too good to be true.
4    Requests to donate to a charitable organization after a disaster that has been in the news.
5    Bad grammar and misspellings.
(https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/safety/online-privacy/phishing-scams.aspx)


Fake emails often (but not always) display some of the following characteristics:
    The senders email address doesnt tally with the trusted organisations website address.
    The email is sent from a completely different address or a free web mail address.
    The email does not use your proper name, but uses a non-specific greeting like dear customer.
    A sense of urgency; for example the threat that unless you act immediately your account may be closed.
    A prominent website link. These can be forged or seem very similar to the proper address, but even a single characters difference means a different website.
    A request for personal information such as user name, password or bank details.
    The email contains spelling and grammatical errors.
    You weren't expecting to get an email from the company that appears to have sent it.
    The entire text of the email is contained within an image rather than the usual text format.
    The image contains an embedded hyperlink to a bogus site.
(http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/scam-emails)

« Reply #58 on: December 01, 2016, 04:25 »
+2
The IP address from the email from donotreply@fineartamerica's is: 207.150.192.50

It says Austin, Texas.

The IP address from the hotmail account is: 65.55.116.12

It says Virginia, Washington

So now I'm really worried...
They wouldn't use a hotmail email and have an error with their English if they were legitimate.  Scammers use hotmail and usually make mistakes with their English.  Stop worrying, you might want to change your email address because if this causes you stress, you are likely to be getting more scam emails now.

ShadySue

« Reply #59 on: December 01, 2016, 06:19 »
+4
They wouldn't use a hotmail email and have an error with their English if they were legitimate.  Scammers use hotmail and usually make mistakes with their English. 

[OT] Sadly, plenty of genuine emails from well-known companies contain grammatical/spelling errors / typos. Including, but not limited to, superfluous or missing apostrophes.

« Reply #60 on: December 01, 2016, 20:15 »
0
They wouldn't use a hotmail email and have an error with their English if they were legitimate.  Scammers use hotmail and usually make mistakes with their English. 

[OT] Sadly, plenty of genuine emails from well-known companies contain grammatical/spelling errors / typos. Including, but not limited to, superfluous or missing apostrophes.

That's probably true, but at least they'd be written by a native English speaker.

The number 1 tipoff that an email is a scam is that there's nothing in it that specifically references you, or the image in question. It's a mass mailing.

Angela: just get up and walk away from this. Read what steheap posted, above.   It's just a dumb scam that goes nowhere.  You have absolutely nothing to worry about.
« Last Edit: December 01, 2016, 20:58 by stockastic »

angelawaye

  • Eat, Sleep, Keyword. Repeat

« Reply #61 on: December 01, 2016, 21:35 »
+3
Thanks guys. I really appreciate all of your input :) No new emails from them.

Now I'm just focusing my time on Christmas backgrounds which won't sell. Cheers!


 

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