MicrostockGroup Sponsors


Author Topic: Things not to shot anymore  (Read 1824 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

nobody

« on: October 23, 2018, 13:28 »
+1
Interesting read on what we shouldn't shoot in the micrcostock business anymore--- I am guilty of having a few of these images  8)

http://webmeup.com/blog/stock-images-to-avoid.html


« Reply #1 on: October 23, 2018, 13:47 »
+4
But do they still  sell? Probably

« Reply #2 on: October 23, 2018, 15:28 »
+4
Interesting read on what we shouldn't shoot in the micrcostock business anymore--- I am guilty of having a few of these images  8)

http://webmeup.com/blog/stock-images-to-avoid.html


No, it's what buyers shouldn't buy (or use).  But they will.

« Reply #3 on: October 23, 2018, 16:04 »
+1
Really? It's interesting to read, but in my opinion it's not really the truth. People still likes "retro" style images 😁
Of course for this style there is a gigantic competition, but there is still great demand, I think

« Reply #4 on: October 24, 2018, 00:38 »
+2
Really? It's interesting to read, but in my opinion it's not really the truth. People still likes "retro" style images 😁
Of course for this style there is a gigantic competition, but there is still great demand, I think
Its one persons educated opinion backed up with no evidence...its a bit of a Social Media thing to have headlines along the lines of "Why you have been doing xyz" wrong.

« Reply #5 on: October 24, 2018, 01:42 »
+1
That was funny! Some of the ideas, like exaggerated emotions were outdated for sure, but one thing was missing: Do not use watermarked images! (Swiped from Google)

Uncle Pete

  • Great Place by a Great Lake - My Home Port
« Reply #6 on: October 24, 2018, 09:36 »
0
Interesting read on what we shouldn't shoot in the micrcostock business anymore--- I am guilty of having a few of these images  8)

http://webmeup.com/blog/stock-images-to-avoid.html


No, it's what buyers shouldn't buy (or use).  But they will.


Right, some people apparently didn't read the article and what it's about. "Are you sure your site's images are good enough to drive traffic?" SEO, clicks, avoiding cliche images and especially the last one avoid low res images.  :) But mostly it's not about what we should shoot, but a better online look.

What we sell and what this article is about, are not exactly the same. Some people want distinct emotions or cheesy looking business handshakes. Little bubble people, anyone here going to be an advocate for that junk? And then the incongruous positioning of models, sure that's fun, but is it making your website look more professional and attractive for customers, or making it look like a cheap attempt at click baiting?  ;)
 
Here's my view. Making what's out of style, over used in the past, and copying what was or is "best selling" is chasing your tail. Look to the future, new ideas, new trends, modern colors, what buyers want now, instead of what they used to want.

He was right with a basic point, bright, clean, clear images that grab the attention of the person viewing it. Avoid dull drab, ordinary scenes, if you are marketing and running a website.

farbled

« Reply #7 on: October 24, 2018, 10:24 »
0

Right, some people apparently didn't read the article and what it's about. "Are you sure your site's images are good enough to drive traffic?" SEO, clicks, avoiding cliche images and especially the last one avoid low res images.  :) But mostly it's not about what we should shoot, but a better online look.

What we sell and what this article is about, are not exactly the same. Some people want distinct emotions or cheesy looking business handshakes. Little bubble people, anyone here going to be an advocate for that junk? And then the incongruous positioning of models, sure that's fun, but is it making your website look more professional and attractive for customers, or making it look like a cheap attempt at click baiting?  ;)
 
Here's my view. Making what's out of style, over used in the past, and copying what was or is "best selling" is chasing your tail. Look to the future, new ideas, new trends, modern colors, what buyers want now, instead of what they used to want.

He was right with a basic point, bright, clean, clear images that grab the attention of the person viewing it. Avoid dull drab, ordinary scenes, if you are marketing and running a website.

I found it very narrow in scope directed at one specific kind of buyer. How about designers who license images because they need an object and don't care about stories or themes? How about advertisers who are selling a product not a concept?

About the only useful part I got was using low res images. I don't shoot people, I don't do concepts or stories. Buyers are as diverse as artists.

The title of this article should be changed to "7 types of stock images you must stop using today for motivational business stories on websites."

Uncle Pete

  • Great Place by a Great Lake - My Home Port
« Reply #8 on: October 24, 2018, 14:18 »
0

Right, some people apparently didn't read the article and what it's about. "Are you sure your site's images are good enough to drive traffic?" SEO, clicks, avoiding cliche images and especially the last one avoid low res images.  :) But mostly it's not about what we should shoot, but a better online look.

What we sell and what this article is about, are not exactly the same. Some people want distinct emotions or cheesy looking business handshakes. Little bubble people, anyone here going to be an advocate for that junk? And then the incongruous positioning of models, sure that's fun, but is it making your website look more professional and attractive for customers, or making it look like a cheap attempt at click baiting?  ;)
 
Here's my view. Making what's out of style, over used in the past, and copying what was or is "best selling" is chasing your tail. Look to the future, new ideas, new trends, modern colors, what buyers want now, instead of what they used to want.

He was right with a basic point, bright, clean, clear images that grab the attention of the person viewing it. Avoid dull drab, ordinary scenes, if you are marketing and running a website.

I found it very narrow in scope directed at one specific kind of buyer. How about designers who license images because they need an object and don't care about stories or themes? How about advertisers who are selling a product not a concept?

About the only useful part I got was using low res images. I don't shoot people, I don't do concepts or stories. Buyers are as diverse as artists.

The title of this article should be changed to "7 types of stock images you must stop using today for motivational business stories on websites."

Let me put this another way. The subject of the article is not, don't shoot these (that's what the OP decided to label it) The article is about website designs, not Microstock.

farbled

« Reply #9 on: October 24, 2018, 15:18 »
0
I didn't see how its about website design, merely image usage. In the latter case, most of these images are specific use kinds of stuff. I guess it makes sense, just within a very limited context.


 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
20 Replies
5842 Views
Last post May 21, 2008, 08:15
by stokfoto
17 Replies
5145 Views
Last post November 23, 2008, 05:35
by MicrostockExp
1 Replies
1078 Views
Last post September 18, 2015, 23:04
by hairybiker777
0 Replies
1024 Views
Last post May 31, 2016, 02:22
by Pauws99
40 Replies
6563 Views
Last post June 19, 2019, 01:32
by georgep7

Sponsors

Microstock Poll Results