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Author Topic: TV news and editorial footage  (Read 381 times)

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« on: October 10, 2019, 21:21 »
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There's something Ive been curious about for a while with regards to the TV news. I do get the impression that the vast majority of the time, if a TV news station is covering a certain story, they will go out and shoot the material themselves and / or retrieve existing footage from their own archives. Though are there occasions when they purchase editorial footage from stock agencies like SS, P5 etc? I'm guessing such instances are pretty rare and they'd only do so as a last resort? Obviously, this wouldn't be suitable for breaking news. I guess the ironic thing is although a number of contributors would likely shoot editorial footage with a TV news audience in mind, the reality is that it's unlikely to end up on the TV news. Though the clip may be featured in a documentary instead, depending on the content and the quality of the footage. 


StockDaebak

« Reply #1 on: October 10, 2019, 21:31 »
+1
I think not for breaking news or current events but for specials and features they might, times are changing though and they have less staff so it is more likely that they could buy from a stock agency but maybe more like form Newsflare vs pond5?.

By the time it's on pond5 it's old news.  They shoot their own stuff and also have wire services like Reuters, AP, AFP and others and access to those feeds and of course many of them just steal home videos off the various social media and use them.

« Reply #2 on: October 10, 2019, 22:44 »
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Yep, I think your assessment is spot on. And good point about news agencies stealing content from social media. I had forgotten about that. They really think they're above the law sometimes. I know of some photographers who have demanded payment when news / media have stolen images from their websites like a David vs Goliath battle. Here in Australia, those media companies almost always refuse to pay up and it's too expensive for the photographer to go through the courts for legal action.

Brasilnut

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« Reply #3 on: October 11, 2019, 05:35 »
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I hate it when news broadcasters ask people to email in their content! I mean the layperson is all too happy just to be mentioned but I would always demand some sort of remuneration.

« Reply #4 on: October 11, 2019, 05:45 »
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News agencies are not our clients though.
A generic event, eg a lgbt pride with flags can be used worldwide no matter the date shot.
Naive example.
But again, having even dedicated or location editorials might have some chances to sell on a documentary or images for book prints ir whatever.

Short story, last year's rally for the "Macedonia" issue gathered thousands of people that protested. I thought "never mind, they will be 99% editorials, oh! make it 100% editorials as long as flags are also shown"

Never thought that except the news, this was an issue that it will be the future subject and content of books (prints) documentaries and web articles in the future.

« Reply #5 on: October 11, 2019, 07:04 »
+2
I have worked for news editing for many years.
Yes, TV stations have subscriptions to news agencies like Reuters.
For most that have not seen that material, try to think of it like the reels Reuters now sells priced more than 1.000 dollars in Pond,
only at TV you pay a general subscription, get a script with time code, names of the ones interviewed and transcripts for subtitling.
In the past that satellite feed was SD only, then 720p  and you had to record that on tape or later XDCAM disc.
Some years ago, you could also download that.
Then, there are also the live feeds.
Therefore, stock cannot compete with that.
But, as Gorge_ says, this material might sell abroad, when for example a foreign channel needs archived material to insert on a story.
A single stock clip is not enough to dress a 60 seconds or 2 minutes news story, where the most we keep the same video is 4-7 seconds.
What I find disappointing is that Reuters for example goes inside a parliament for a news story and then has the right? to sell that to stock.
Howe can I get that right too?
When I go to visit a European Parliament and taking photos or videos is allowed, that is for personal use only, not stock.
Why?

Well, if justice is blind who is heartless? Not us for sure!


 

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