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Author Topic: video splicer suggestions  (Read 2155 times)

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« on: February 27, 2019, 16:50 »
0
Hi!

Please recommend a good video 'splicer'. I just want to be able to import a clip (say 1 minute long) - and then pick the start/end locations and split it creating a new output clip. I don't want it to actually "re-process/re-export" the video (i.e., which can take 1-2 minutes) - but rather it just resets the start/end markers and outputs a new clip in a few seconds.

The one I currently use doesn't really work for all videos (in that it doesn't set the start/end positions correctly) so I am looking for a new one.

Thanks!


dpimborough

« Reply #1 on: February 28, 2019, 03:04 »
+1
DaVinci Resolve

« Reply #2 on: February 28, 2019, 04:29 »
0
A simple google search gives many free and light options.
I cannot suggest anyone, haven't used, all my footage usually needs process / corrections.
But,
using any non linear editing suite gives some advantages.
From just cutting to in-out points to pinching a little or to heavy
color correction, grading, re framing (a little bit) correcting the horizon, speeding time up or down, whatever.

If googling, use different keywords: video trimming or cutting might give more search results.

:)

« Reply #3 on: February 28, 2019, 05:59 »
0
Quicktime can do this. At least the older version 7 (PRO).

But if you actually want to SELL your footage, and not just upload it, I would suggest not doing the "direct from the memory card" thing.

Grade, reframe (if necessary), fix details, and upload 10% of what you would upload using the "spraypaint" method.  ;)

« Reply #4 on: February 28, 2019, 10:34 »
0
yes, I have "googled" - but there is one company that has effective spammed pretty much all keyword combinations for exactly the same product (the "wondershare" video editor/converter/etc) - which - isn't really all that great, so it's hard to find anything else that isn't some variant of the wondershare product.

I am looking for something where I can simply pop in a clip, edit the start/end points, and output the final result quickly (without taking 5 minutes to process a 10 second video which most video editors will do).

Any recommendations on that?

As for post processing/color grading/etc - I aim for taking the shot/video correctly the first time, so I don't have to re-do things over again. So, very rarely do I have to do any post processing.

« Reply #5 on: February 28, 2019, 12:35 »
0
Quote
http://www.microstockgroup.com/general-stock-discussion/how-to-leave-royalties-to-survivors-after-death-answers-from-the-agencies/


ah! I really envy you! I cannot even white balance accurately! :D :P

As a general comment, I believed that there will not be any program that will not render the final clip,
You define a new file with different length and parameters. But I seem proven wrong.
Here is a non promoted software (free) https://www.videohelp.com/software/LosslessCut

Came as a result in this search:
https://www.google.com/search?q=video+trimming+without+re+encoding&oq=video+trimming+without+&aqs=chrome.1.69i57j0l2.6863j0j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

Hope it helps.
(I still envy you though!)

Uncle Pete

  • Great Place by a Great Lake - My Home Port
« Reply #6 on: February 28, 2019, 13:29 »
+1
Thanks I'll try that George. I'll still process, and make corrections, but sometimes I just want and easy edit after that and Mpeg streamclip had, in and out and crop. Nice and simple.

« Reply #7 on: February 28, 2019, 14:14 »
0
As for post processing/color grading/etc - I aim for taking the shot/video correctly the first time, so I don't have to re-do things over again. So, very rarely do I have to do any post processing.

If you take a look at the bestsellers at any stock agency, you will find that 90-100% of the clips are quite heavily graded with a cinematic look.

Unless you have in-camera LUTs, a magical cinematic sensor, and/or a nice combination of 2-3 filters on your lenses, I doubt you can get a graded shot in camera.  ;)

« Reply #8 on: February 28, 2019, 16:03 »
+1
As for post processing/color grading/etc - I aim for taking the shot/video correctly the first time, so I don't have to re-do things over again. So, very rarely do I have to do any post processing.

If you take a look at the bestsellers at any stock agency, you will find that 90-100% of the clips are quite heavily graded with a cinematic look.

Unless you have in-camera LUTs, a magical cinematic sensor, and/or a nice combination of 2-3 filters on your lenses, I doubt you can get a graded shot in camera.  ;)

yes. I have a magical camera. :) complete with flying unicorns, white puffy clouds and rainbows. i press a button, and it magically does all the work for me. except splice videos :P

« Reply #9 on: February 28, 2019, 17:02 »
+1
Thanks for the suggestion, doesn't work though. (Still 'pre-cuts' my video in the wrong location)...

Any other suggestions?

Thanks

Quote
http://www.microstockgroup.com/general-stock-discussion/how-to-leave-royalties-to-survivors-after-death-answers-from-the-agencies/


ah! I really envy you! I cannot even white balance accurately! :D :P

As a general comment, I believed that there will not be any program that will not render the final clip,
You define a new file with different length and parameters. But I seem proven wrong.
Here is a non promoted software (free) https://www.videohelp.com/software/LosslessCut

Came as a result in this search:
https://www.google.com/search?q=video+trimming+without+re+encoding&oq=video+trimming+without+&aqs=chrome.1.69i57j0l2.6863j0j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

Hope it helps.
(I still envy you though!)

« Reply #10 on: March 01, 2019, 02:36 »
0
Only in-camera editing if it supports it, (what is your camera?)
some older models had similar features I think, like Vixia or
e.g. canon 600D had a "snapshot" 8sec max in camera maker.
(edit) it seems that GoPros also support this in camera trimming funktion.

I think that pressing the rec button at the "right" moments is the best solution.
Easy to say, hard to do it though...

here is another link, I also don't use VLC, so, I dunno if it will work for you.
If I got it right, it isolates and saves parts of a bigger clip.

https://www.cnet.com/how-to/how-to-create-video-clips-in-vlc/

:)
« Last Edit: March 01, 2019, 02:39 by georgep7 »

« Reply #11 on: March 01, 2019, 02:45 »
0
Try Mpeg StreamClip, it's free. I use it to cut video and to remove sound.

« Reply #12 on: March 01, 2019, 05:06 »
+1
As for post processing/color grading/etc - I aim for taking the shot/video correctly the first time, so I don't have to re-do things over again. So, very rarely do I have to do any post processing.

If you take a look at the bestsellers at any stock agency, you will find that 90-100% of the clips are quite heavily graded with a cinematic look.

Unless you have in-camera LUTs, a magical cinematic sensor, and/or a nice combination of 2-3 filters on your lenses, I doubt you can get a graded shot in camera.  ;)

yes. I have a magical camera. :) complete with flying unicorns, white puffy clouds and rainbows. i press a button, and it magically does all the work for me. except splice videos :P

That's great! You can do what the professionals working on $500 million movies can't.  :)

You can of course do what you want, but a portfolio of 4,000 edited clips should get you at least $10,000 per month, and if they're quite good, $20,000.

So instead of throwing anything and everything at the agencies as fast as possible, and making $0.20 per clip/month, a different method is to just select the best clips, edit and grade them to near perfection, and enjoy $5 per clip/month.

To each their own I suppose, just wanted to tell you what works.  ;)

The same with photos by the way. The big sellers all do heavy Photoshop (or equivalent) work, and many (if not all) of the best selling stock photos are far from "straight from camera".
« Last Edit: March 01, 2019, 05:11 by increasingdifficulty »

« Reply #13 on: March 04, 2019, 11:09 »
0
As for post processing/color grading/etc - I aim for taking the shot/video correctly the first time, so I don't have to re-do things over again. So, very rarely do I have to do any post processing.

If you take a look at the bestsellers at any stock agency, you will find that 90-100% of the clips are quite heavily graded with a cinematic look.

Unless you have in-camera LUTs, a magical cinematic sensor, and/or a nice combination of 2-3 filters on your lenses, I doubt you can get a graded shot in camera.  ;)
I totally agree: good grading is one of the most important factor in a best seller clip.
Unless maybe for some editorial/news content

« Reply #14 on: March 07, 2019, 00:33 »
+1
Probably not the best place to ask, but in a nutshell, just what is this "grading" thing?

I saw one pretentious twit on Youtube reviewing the Mavic, who colors his videos so badly it looked like the camera is broken. You mean that stuff?


« Reply #15 on: March 07, 2019, 02:03 »
+1
Quote
Probably not the best place to ask, but in a nutshell, just what is this "grading" thing?

I saw one pretentious twit on Youtube reviewing the Mavic, who colors his videos so badly it looked like the camera is broken. You mean that stuff?

Youtube is a pure commercial land. "Buy this, buy from my affiliates, buy more, toss it buy a new one".

People there, even f@rt in a "cinematic" way! XD :P

Coloring is the right word and it is an art, a science if you will. It is not the software or the console, it is a combination of the artist and his perspective. And a colorist is a totally different person that an editor or an editor assistant or a camera operator or a "Do-it-all" Youtuber.

I admire (actually... envy) colorists, I can edit and bring up some feelings in combination with audio or cuts,
but a colorist can change one's mood with his work...

« Reply #16 on: March 07, 2019, 03:47 »
+1
Probably not the best place to ask, but in a nutshell, just what is this "grading" thing?

I saw one pretentious twit on Youtube reviewing the Mavic, who colors his videos so badly it looked like the camera is broken. You mean that stuff?

Just like georgep7 said, it is an art and a very big part of filmmaking - coloring.

And just like ANYTHING on YouTube, you will have to watch 100 videos, and maybe 10 (or less) will have the good information. But it is definitely out there for free.

Mad Max: Fury Road might have over the top grading for some people, but here you can see how much color grading changed the look. Just like you would expect, before colorists get a hand on the RAW material, it looks just like what we would see on our own cameras, more or less. ;)


« Reply #17 on: March 07, 2019, 03:47 »
+1

« Reply #18 on: March 07, 2019, 05:16 »
+1
Quote
Forgot the link:

oh? we can put links to videos? I didn't knew!
Here is a quite informative tutorial on color theory from Blender Guru
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qj1FK8n7WgY

if I may add, Youtube videos prior 2014-2015 have a lot of grading info and "how to" do or learn, on Magic Lantern "raw", CineStyle, (accepting the 4:2:0 limitations). I have watched so many Youtube shorts shot on just an e.g. 550D with no AF, gimbal, or premade LUTs applied and they looked really good. Not "emulating" a film preset but actually giving the short's mood.

Well, all those before people start considering a second card as a necessity or be miserable for "just" UHD 4K, or whatever...

 

« Reply #19 on: March 07, 2019, 06:55 »
0
Quote
Probably not the best place to ask, but in a nutshell, just what is this "grading" thing?

I saw one pretentious twit on Youtube reviewing the Mavic, who colors his videos so badly it looked like the camera is broken. You mean that stuff?

Youtube is a pure commercial land. "Buy this, buy from my affiliates, buy more, toss it buy a new one".

People there, even f@rt in a "cinematic" way! XD :P

Coloring is the right word and it is an art, a science if you will. It is not the software or the console, it is a combination of the artist and his perspective. And a colorist is a totally different person that an editor or an editor assistant or a camera operator or a "Do-it-all" Youtuber.

I admire (actually... envy) colorists, I can edit and bring up some feelings in combination with audio or cuts,
but a colorist can change one's mood with his work...

I would "+1" you but dunno how. Maybe cos I'm new here it's not an option?

OK so grading is basically altering the white color balance, on purpose? Perhaps selectively, like that hideous 'teal and orange' thing all the movies do now?

Cheers!

« Reply #20 on: March 07, 2019, 07:15 »
0
I only know the basics. If this helps, it is not only that teal and orange give the maximum contrast, or a golden hour replication reflecting as a feeling to the viewer and similar. It is more, like skin tone correction, manipulation, bringing up details with masking and changing color in areas, giving depth, giving the feeling of the object/talent on screen. Teal and orange is not the only way. There is one part to bring up the info, the details and another to give the vieweer a feeling. If you observe movies, other color palletes might dominate, e.g. deep blue and it's opposites. In a realistic fight scene, blood must be red I gueśs!

« Reply #21 on: March 07, 2019, 07:44 »
+1
OK so grading is basically altering the white color balance, on purpose?

You're always altering the white balance on purpose. :)

Anyway, there are two main steps when creating a look for film:

1. Color correction - this is where you set the desired exposure, get a neutral white balance and make sure nothing is clipping. Basically, you're goal is to get a neutral start and the same basic look for all clips that belong together.

2. Color grading - this is the creative part. This is where you change the colors and contrast to enhance the mood.

---


Perhaps selectively, like that hideous 'teal and orange' thing all the movies do now?

Cheers!

Yes, very selectively. And the "teal and orange" thing is certainly the most common, but not the only look. Why teal and orange? Because movies usually contain people and they tend to look strange if they're purple or green. :) The sky is blue, and it looks very bad purple, so either you go to teal/cyan or keep it neutral.

It's nothing new, by the way, it's just that it's easier to make it extreme in the digital world, and everyone is now their own color grading expert, which is why we see so much of it on YouTube.

It's often more a question of how extreme the orange teal look is. Many times you don't notice it, but it's there and you just think it "looks like film". Action movies sometimes use it to an extreme, which is what you would probably say is hideous.

Anyway, The Matrix is a good example of a completely different color palette. It's very green.

In Game Of Thrones, there is very different color grading depending on where they are. In the north, it is very blue and has a cold white balance. The opposite in the south.

« Reply #22 on: March 07, 2019, 08:18 »
0
Quote
In Game Of Thrones, there is very different color grading depending on where they are. In the north, it is very blue and has a cold white balance. The opposite in the south.

That sounds way better  ;D

There's 3 reasons I long ago gave up watching movies, and the teal n orange thing was one of them...

Uncle Pete

  • Great Place by a Great Lake - My Home Port
« Reply #23 on: March 07, 2019, 10:18 »
+1
Only in-camera editing if it supports it, (what is your camera?)
some older models had similar features I think, like Vixia or
e.g. canon 600D had a "snapshot" 8sec max in camera maker.
(edit) it seems that GoPros also support this in camera trimming funktion.

I think that pressing the rec button at the "right" moments is the best solution.
Easy to say, hard to do it though...

here is another link, I also don't use VLC, so, I dunno if it will work for you.
If I got it right, it isolates and saves parts of a bigger clip.

https://www.cnet.com/how-to/how-to-create-video-clips-in-vlc/

:)

Amazing, I never knew that VLC did any editing, maybe a screen capture but never know that tip could be useful some day.


« Reply #24 on: March 07, 2019, 11:31 »
+1
Having even a remote chance at being successful in producing stock content relies on you being efficient. You can't be efficient using programs meant for transcoding. You need to spend time learning how to grade and with this includes how to use scopes and other correction methods. Maybe others have a better eye than I do but if you're not using scopes, you're not grading you're guessing. My suggestion is don't overdo the grading. Don't go "artisitic". Gentle is the operative word here. You are not producing a final product but something that others can take and finish off. Your the first step in the production chain that yields the final product. Don't approach it as if you need to be the last.

« Reply #25 on: March 07, 2019, 13:14 »
+2
@Biggles, the one above deservs the +1 you were talking about.

@Peter, thank you for bringing scopes to the talk and for the advice in total!

« Reply #26 on: March 07, 2019, 21:01 »
+1
I figured out the plus thingy and you both got one. :)


 

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