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Author Topic: Where to Live as a Stock Photographer?  (Read 25227 times)

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« Reply #50 on: November 18, 2014, 13:15 »
0
I used to wait at that long too for trains during peak time. Lately I know the trick, during super peak time, I took a train one station to the opposite direction, then board to my train. Worked.every.time. But it might only work for certain location though.

Not possible at buona vista... both directions completely full :'(


« Reply #51 on: November 18, 2014, 13:33 »
0
I used to wait at that long too for trains during peak time. Lately I know the trick, during super peak time, I took a train one station to the opposite direction, then board to my train. Worked.every.time. But it might only work for certain location though.

Not possible at buona vista... both directions completely full :'(

Take buses. I worked right at Buona Vista and never took MRT from there, buses are much better.

« Reply #52 on: November 18, 2014, 13:38 »
0
Take buses. I worked right at Buona Vista and never took MRT from there, buses are much better.
It's ok, I'm not there anymore. :D

My friend took a bus from BV to Boon Lay and it took her an hour to reach. With the MRT, 20 minutes.

I lived at Bukit Gombak and the connections were horrible and for me it didn't make sense to use the bus. So I tried to avoid peak hours whenever I could, which was not often, as they have a long-tail distribution instead of a peak :)

« Reply #53 on: November 18, 2014, 17:16 »
0
Turkey has low rentals in Istanbul and even less if you live in other urban areas (all have excellent bus connections, ferry service great around sea of marmara);  food in markets is cheaper, and restaurants about 1/2 of US or European  equivalents


i always heard good feedbacks about Istanbul too, it's on my to-do list since a long time.....


check our Istanbul page for general orientation http://cascoly.com/trav/turkey/istanbul.asp

there are many gems like the Rustem Pasha Mosque that don't make the standard tours
http://cascoly.com/symbio/list.asp?list=129&w=4&word=rustem&site=http://turkey.symbiostock-network.com

as I mentioned, the Turkish bus system is fantastic and an easy way to get around on your own.

my Turkish partner, Lutfi,  is a university professor & licensed guide, so we can help if you need any sort of arrangements - hotel, rental cars, etc, or just for advice -- you can look at our previous itineraries to get ideas of where you might want to visit and how to put a trip together.

a warning - next april is going to be VERY busy in Istanbul and hotels are jumping their rates for the 100th anniversary of Gallipoli

Hobostocker

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« Reply #54 on: November 18, 2014, 21:58 »
0


a warning - next april is going to be VERY busy in Istanbul and hotels are jumping their rates for the 100th anniversary of Gallipoli

dont worry for another year of two i'm planning to stay in Asia but after that i plan to travel the whole central asia and middle east and Istanbul is one of MUST see !


Buffalo Bill

« Reply #55 on: November 19, 2014, 02:40 »
+2
What about North Korea ?  Heard it is cheap there and transportation is clean and fast.

StockPhotosArt.com

« Reply #56 on: November 19, 2014, 02:53 »
+1
Contrary to common belief, Singapore is actually very affordable. Average cost for a meal in a food court 2-3$, rental can be as low as 200-300$, of course you can also have a luxury apartment for 30 times of that price. Great public transport, no need for a car. Best healthcare in the world and very heavily subsidized even for foreigners. Great services. For photography: diverse ethnicity, short fly to anywhere in Asia. I lived there for 8 years and now kicking myself everyday for not staying there.

If the cost of living calculators found online are to be trusted, living in Singapore is much more expensive than Portugal.

And we're talking about a western European country that despite not being the most wealthy doesn't fall behind any other in most aspects when it comes to services, access to technology, healthcare, accessibilities, etc even in the smallest towns .

« Reply #57 on: November 19, 2014, 10:42 »
0
I keep changing my mind. One day I want to move to Sicily and be mates with Inspector Montalbano, the next I'll have dreams of moving back to London and living like David Hemmings in "Blow Up".

The reality (if baby has her way) is likely to be some seedy English seaside town - when I'm too old to fight off the seagulls dive bombing my fish and chips.


« Reply #58 on: November 19, 2014, 13:12 »
0
Contrary to common belief, Singapore is actually very affordable. Average cost for a meal in a food court 2-3$, rental can be as low as 200-300$, of course you can also have a luxury apartment for 30 times of that price. Great public transport, no need for a car. Best healthcare in the world and very heavily subsidized even for foreigners. Great services. For photography: diverse ethnicity, short fly to anywhere in Asia. I lived there for 8 years and now kicking myself everyday for not staying there.

If the cost of living calculators found online are to be trusted, living in Singapore is much more expensive than Portugal.

And we're talking about a western European country that despite not being the most wealthy doesn't fall behind any other in most aspects when it comes to services, access to technology, healthcare, accessibilities, etc even in the smallest towns .

Does the living calculator takes taxes into account?
According to your own post on the other thread taxes take out an essential part of your income. FYI, i have never paid more than 5% on taxes when i was in Singapore, for about the same income that subject to 30% here in the US.

StockPhotosArt.com

« Reply #59 on: November 19, 2014, 14:39 »
0
Contrary to common belief, Singapore is actually very affordable. Average cost for a meal in a food court 2-3$, rental can be as low as 200-300$, of course you can also have a luxury apartment for 30 times of that price. Great public transport, no need for a car. Best healthcare in the world and very heavily subsidized even for foreigners. Great services. For photography: diverse ethnicity, short fly to anywhere in Asia. I lived there for 8 years and now kicking myself everyday for not staying there.

If the cost of living calculators found online are to be trusted, living in Singapore is much more expensive than Portugal.

And we're talking about a western European country that despite not being the most wealthy doesn't fall behind any other in most aspects when it comes to services, access to technology, healthcare, accessibilities, etc even in the smallest towns .

Does the living calculator takes taxes into account?
According to your own post on the other thread taxes take out an essential part of your income. FYI, i have never paid more than 5% on taxes when i was in Singapore, for about the same income that subject to 30% here in the US.

The comparison was only in terms of price of goods. But some of them were incredibly higher. I cannot compare in terms of taxes. Maybe in the end Singapore may be cheaper.

Hobostocker

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« Reply #60 on: November 19, 2014, 22:49 »
0
from today's BBC :

Singapore tops ranking of best place to do business
http://www.bbc.com/news/business-30123422


yeah, nr.1 place to make business, as long as you afford to pay the bills ....  ;D

Hobostocker

    This user is banned.
« Reply #61 on: November 19, 2014, 22:53 »
0
from NUMBEO, a rough idea of Singapore's cost of living in USD $ :

http://www.numbeo.com/cost-of-living/country_result.jsp?country=Singapore&displayCurrency=USD


notice that some of the items (beer and cigarettes for istance) are almost 10x times more than in nearby countries like Indonesia !




Harvepino

« Reply #62 on: November 20, 2014, 03:22 »
+1
Is it about cost or quality of living?
Countries that usually top the rankings in terms of quality of living are New Zealand, Canada and Scandinavian countries. Scandinavia is very expensive though.
When it comes to cost... depends on how much comfort one needs. You can live in a wooden shack in country with cheap food and your cost of living will be close to zero. But are you ok living like that? Some are. The goal should be not to find the cheapest, but the right balance between cost and comfort, which is very individual.

« Reply #63 on: November 20, 2014, 03:31 »
+1
Also, I don't mind to live somewhere slightly more expensive than somewhere cheap, but you have to watch your steps and be extremely vigilant all the time not get robbed, raped or even killed.

mystock

« Reply #64 on: November 20, 2014, 04:13 »
+1
Completely agree with the two previous post: living in a country / town that has good public transport, easy access to events (e.g. live music), good beer, and a certain level of safety is a requirement. Doesn't matter if it costs a little more: I work to live, I don't live to work.

« Reply #65 on: November 20, 2014, 04:51 »
0
i live in italy, and i'll never want to change :) (until i will have jobs)

Hobostocker

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« Reply #66 on: November 20, 2014, 06:21 »
0
Completely agree with the two previous post: living in a country / town that has good public transport, easy access to events (e.g. live music), good beer, and a certain level of safety is a requirement. Doesn't matter if it costs a little more: I work to live, I don't live to work.

how much is your monthly budget ?




Hobostocker

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« Reply #67 on: November 20, 2014, 07:00 »
0
but the right balance between cost and comfort, which is very individual.


China and Thailand were a perfect balance but now the party's over.












Tror

« Reply #68 on: November 20, 2014, 09:55 »
0
but the right balance between cost and comfort, which is very individual.


China and Thailand were a perfect balance but now the party's over.

Why?

« Reply #69 on: November 20, 2014, 12:35 »
+2
notice that some of the items (beer and cigarettes for istance) are almost 10x times more than in nearby countries

Cigarettes are a stupidity tax. You have to pay it only if you are stupid.
Smart people don't pay this tax.
« Last Edit: November 20, 2014, 12:40 by Realist »

Tror

« Reply #70 on: November 20, 2014, 13:33 »
+1
Is it about cost or quality of living?
Countries that usually top the rankings in terms of quality of living are New Zealand, Canada and Scandinavian countries. Scandinavia is very expensive though.
When it comes to cost... depends on how much comfort one needs. You can live in a wooden shack in country with cheap food and your cost of living will be close to zero. But are you ok living like that? Some are. The goal should be not to find the cheapest, but the right balance between cost and comfort, which is very individual.

I kindly disagree. Cost of living vs. quality of life - both are somehow connected if you live off microstock. Our income does not adjust to the country. The more expensive a country gets the less we can afford. And while it might be true that one cannot buy happiness, I am not so comfortable meditating in all my spare time in a 20sqm Apartment because I have to save money.

Statistics like "Best country to live in..." etc. usually rely on a) that your income is equalling or matching the countries average or above and b) exclude local mind sets and subjective criteria of a country. In Norway, Finland, Germany I would go crazy about the relatively reserved people. In Asia I would not feel so well on the long run being always a "Farang". Others might be perfectly happy in Sweden if they cannot cope with the daily Chaos in Bahia.

Second: living in a cheaper country has nothing to do with living in a wooden shack...lol. Healthcare, housing, services such as laundry, internet etc. many of those services I consider to be of equal quality than in the US or Europe - especially because you can afford the premium services. A good private health insurance in Chile e.g. gets you much better quality than the public health insurance in Slovakia...and it is cheaper. I met through the years so many people with chronic diseases who could not afford proper treatment in the US and therefore moved to a "cheap" country. Many americans get treatment in Latin america. Elderly retirees expatriating to Asia for advances care and daily help. Western europeans go not only for dental Jobs to eastern Europe - there are whole clinics made especially for UK patients since they seem to have a healthcare problem there (never tried it in London :-) ).

The "new" countries, the ones we regarded once to be third world or upcoming may offer a lot more quality to many as they might expect. Some people still think they get mugged immediately after popping out of the Airport in Kuala Lumpur or whereever lol.


shudderstok

« Reply #71 on: November 20, 2014, 14:20 »
0
but the right balance between cost and comfort, which is very individual.


China and Thailand were a perfect balance but now the party's over.

Why?

because both countries are a dump. china is an amazing place to travel in, but whoa jimminy cricket, let's be real it is not a place to live in. thailand, the land of smile LOL and lies. again, a great place to have a month long holiday in, but if you have ever lived there it is really a messed up place, and so xenophobic. i have never seen such a large group of expats who are just miserable and complain all the time anywhere, and don't even get me going about the quality of expat there. sure there are exceptions, but for the most part it's a sad little place to live in.

Tror

« Reply #72 on: November 20, 2014, 16:07 »
0
but the right balance between cost and comfort, which is very individual.


China and Thailand were a perfect balance but now the party's over.

Why?

because both countries are a dump. china is an amazing place to travel in, but whoa jimminy cricket, let's be real it is not a place to live in. thailand, the land of smile LOL and lies. again, a great place to have a month long holiday in, but if you have ever lived there it is really a messed up place, and so xenophobic. i have never seen such a large group of expats who are just miserable and complain all the time anywhere, and don't even get me going about the quality of expat there. sure there are exceptions, but for the most part it's a sad little place to live in.

Thanks for the clarification. I know Thailand and considered in moving there maybe someday. Never did it so far because I felt to "farang" after some time.

shudderstok

« Reply #73 on: November 20, 2014, 19:44 »
-1
but the right balance between cost and comfort, which is very individual.


China and Thailand were a perfect balance but now the party's over.

Why?

because both countries are a dump. china is an amazing place to travel in, but whoa jimminy cricket, let's be real it is not a place to live in. thailand, the land of smile LOL and lies. again, a great place to have a month long holiday in, but if you have ever lived there it is really a messed up place, and so xenophobic. i have never seen such a large group of expats who are just miserable and complain all the time anywhere, and don't even get me going about the quality of expat there. sure there are exceptions, but for the most part it's a sad little place to live in.

Thanks for the clarification. I know Thailand and considered in moving there maybe someday. Never did it so far because I felt to "farang" after some time.

try it, you might like it. basically keep away from all bar girls and those areas, keep all of your money out of thailand, don't even think about opening a business or even buying anything in that country cause you will most likely lose. it becomes a parody living there after a while. there is an old expat saying in thailand " thais are lovely because you know they are only lying to you when they open their mouths" a bit extreme, but not really that far from the truth. great place to visit though even if it's for an extended period, but living there is a mixed bag of continual tricks. most farang who live there do a lot of complaining, though there are very few who actually love it there and succeed, but for the most part the expats there are the garbage collection of the world, a sad lot.

Hobostocker

    This user is banned.
« Reply #74 on: November 20, 2014, 22:22 »
+1
Cigarettes are a stupidity tax. You have to pay it only if you are stupid.
Smart people don't pay this tax.

smart people don't pay taxes at all.


 

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