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Author Topic: Which Licenses allow the use of photos in Social Media (Facebook etc.)  (Read 1964 times)

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« on: February 10, 2014, 11:06 »
0
Hello everybody!

I suddenly find myself on the buyer's side and being a contributor I of course want to abide by all licenses. That has led me to realize that some licenses do not allow (or severely limit) the use of photos on Social Media sites like Facebook. Can someone help me? Where should I go to buy photos for commercial use on our company profile and in Facebook-ads?

Thanks,

MT
« Last Edit: February 10, 2014, 11:20 by MarcvsTvllivs »


ShadySue

« Reply #1 on: February 10, 2014, 11:32 »
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I can't answer your question directly, but it may be worth considering that you have more leeway if you alter the photos in some way, e.g. by putting text into them, to make them less likely to be stolen.
on iStock, the only restriction for social media is:
"If the Content is reproduced on a social media platform or other third party website, (i) the rights granted herein shall automatically be revoked in the event that the platform website seeks to exploit purported rights to the Content contrary to the terms of this Agreement, and (ii) in such event, upon iStockphotos request, you shall remove any Content from such platform or website. "
« Last Edit: February 10, 2014, 11:43 by ShadySue »

« Reply #2 on: February 10, 2014, 11:39 »
0
Hello everybody!

I suddenly find myself on the buyer's side and being a contributor I of course want to abide by all licenses. That has led me to realize that some licenses do not allow (or severely limit) the use of photos on Social Media sites like Facebook. Can someone help me? Where should I go to buy photos for commercial use on our company profile and in Facebook-ads?

Thanks,

MT

Pretty much all social media will claim you grant them an RF license on anything you upload, which of course, technically you can't do.  However, I haven't seen any agency bat an eye at putting your designed ad or whatever or FB or anywhere else.

« Reply #3 on: February 10, 2014, 11:58 »
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DT has a whole front end set up to let you make FB covers

http://www.timelineimages.com/

Many of the stock agency licenses include a maximum size you can display the unmodified image on a web page although SS removed the specific number limit and switched to a phrase like "for display purposes". SS has some sort of deal with FB for purchases for use just in FB ads - but that might not be the best option if you want to use the same image for multiple purposes as they limit the use under that deal to a FB ad only.

When I put my own site's license together, I included a pixel limit of 1,200 pixels on the long edge for unmodified web display

http://www.digitalbristles.com/License/standard-license-agreement/


« Reply #4 on: February 10, 2014, 12:00 »
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Alright, thanks guys & gals!

The problem with social media asking for licenses you cannot technically give strikes me as a bit silly -- as you can't give them, so the agencies shouldn't have to fear them. Well, anyways, after reading all the license terms from the major agencies* I had arrived at a similar conclusion to yours, Sean. Looking at the big four I find Fotolia's terms too confusing in the matter, Shutterstock's to forbidding, Dreamstime's clear and concise (if explicitly silent on social media) and iStock's, especially the part quoted by you, Sue, quite fair and practical.

*I am a lawyer and a contributor and I have actually never read them. Shoot me now.

« Reply #5 on: February 10, 2014, 12:07 »
+1
... I am a lawyer and a contributor and I have actually never read them...

That's funny - but not all that surprising.

For any of us who purchase software, we just click on the bazillion page license that claims the product isn't fit for any purpose, the company's not responsible for anything etc. What choice do we have in practical terms anyway? So we get used to by and large ignoring that stuff :)

Uncle Pete

« Reply #6 on: February 10, 2014, 12:21 »
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And I'll add, does reading them change anything? Or the other part, what happens if you click "No" instead of "I Agree". Well nothing happens including you can't get an image or you can't use the software. So it's more of a formality than anything one has any control over.

I have disagreed with a few sites, terms and contracts and I'm not a member contributor because of that. Simple enough, Just say no to partner program abuse.

When signing a paper contract, you can line out items, but electronic you get either I agree or Nothing.


... I am a lawyer and a contributor and I have actually never read them...

That's funny - but not all that surprising.

For any of us who purchase software, we just click on the bazillion page license that claims the product isn't fit for any purpose, the company's not responsible for anything etc. What choice do we have in practical terms anyway? So we get used to by and large ignoring that stuff :)
« Last Edit: February 10, 2014, 12:24 by Uncle Pete »


 

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