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Author Topic: Wanting to Purchase Stock Video Copyright  (Read 23377 times)

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« on: September 08, 2013, 11:04 »
0
Hi All

I sell on Pond5 (with the same username as I have registered here). If anyone is interested in getting out of stock video I may be interested in buying the rights to your existing portfolios.

Let me know if you would like to talk about it further.

TE

admin edit: changed the subject to be more descriptive
« Last Edit: September 09, 2013, 08:31 by leaf »


tab62

« Reply #1 on: September 08, 2013, 12:26 »
-2
Would you happen to be " Acelerator"?



« Reply #2 on: September 08, 2013, 13:13 »
0
Would you happen to be " Acelerator"?

No.

Don't know who Acelerator is!

As I said I am on P5 with the same username.

« Reply #3 on: September 08, 2013, 13:24 »
0
sorry for the investigation but pond5 allows that

279 / 36 = 8 clips sold per month

I guess it isn't pond5 making you the money, perhaps you could share with other footage contributors where you do big bucks or will you keep it for yourself and then submit after buying? ;D

« Reply #4 on: September 08, 2013, 13:38 »
+4
I uploaded a few clips and then "forgot about" Pond5 for quite a while. It was only when I got a sale that I figured it was worth looking into more. Most of the content was uploaded in the last 2 years and a lot of it is SD which obviously is less in demand. My current split is around 2700 HD and 4500 SD.

My view on stock is that it is a long term investment - I earn my "corn" in other areas of TV (I'll give you a clue - my username!).

At the moment I earn $X00 a month from this stock on Pond5. The goal through adding more footage by either shooting more myself (over 1000 clips currently in edit / upload) or buying other portfolios is to get to $X000 fairly quickly at which point it should be self financing (i.e to allow me to pay people to shoot and edit for me).

At least that is the plan! I already completed the purchase of 1 library which I am keeping separate at the moment and am negotiating to buy another.

TE

« Reply #5 on: September 08, 2013, 13:41 »
0
that is interesting, thanks for the explanation!

« Reply #6 on: September 08, 2013, 15:35 »
0
I uploaded a few clips and then "forgot about" Pond5 for quite a while. It was only when I got a sale that I figured it was worth looking into more. Most of the content was uploaded in the last 2 years and a lot of it is SD which obviously is less in demand. My current split is around 2700 HD and 4500 SD.

My view on stock is that it is a long term investment - I earn my "corn" in other areas of TV (I'll give you a clue - my username!).

At the moment I earn $X00 a month from this stock on Pond5. The goal through adding more footage by either shooting more myself (over 1000 clips currently in edit / upload) or buying other portfolios is to get to $X000 fairly quickly at which point it should be self financing (i.e to allow me to pay people to shoot and edit for me).

At least that is the plan! I already completed the purchase of 1 library which I am keeping separate at the moment and am negotiating to buy another.

TE

So, if there is so much money, why would anyone want to sell you their work?

« Reply #7 on: September 08, 2013, 15:57 »
+3
I uploaded a few clips and then "forgot about" Pond5 for quite a while. It was only when I got a sale that I figured it was worth looking into more. Most of the content was uploaded in the last 2 years and a lot of it is SD which obviously is less in demand. My current split is around 2700 HD and 4500 SD.

My view on stock is that it is a long term investment - I earn my "corn" in other areas of TV (I'll give you a clue - my username!).

At the moment I earn $X00 a month from this stock on Pond5. The goal through adding more footage by either shooting more myself (over 1000 clips currently in edit / upload) or buying other portfolios is to get to $X000 fairly quickly at which point it should be self financing (i.e to allow me to pay people to shoot and edit for me).

At least that is the plan! I already completed the purchase of 1 library which I am keeping separate at the moment and am negotiating to buy another.

TE

So, if there is so much money, why would anyone want to sell you their work?

perhaps someone that needs money now, if I had a buyer for my pictures I would sell them yesterday

« Reply #8 on: September 08, 2013, 21:44 »
+1
And you can always produce more work after selling your current crop.

« Reply #9 on: September 09, 2013, 07:34 »
+3
Hi Sean

As luissantos84 and elvinstar rightly point out, sometimes people need money "now" and for whatever reason cannot borrow through the usual channels.

One person I know got into stock video part time at University and sold their portfolio when they graduated and went into their chosen career (nothing to do with stills or video). The money they made from selling their portfolio paid for the deposit on a house

I completely understand why most people wouldn't want to do this, hence my thread title, but for some people it can be the right solution for their problems.

TE
« Last Edit: September 09, 2013, 07:47 by TheEngineer »

« Reply #10 on: September 09, 2013, 08:57 »
+2
I will sell mine for 1.5 million.

www.istockphoto.com/jjneff

« Reply #11 on: September 09, 2013, 09:02 »
0
I will sell mine for 1.5 million.

www.istockphoto.com/jjneff


lets say you are doing 5k $ / month

that is 25 years income ;D

« Reply #12 on: September 09, 2013, 09:38 »
0
usually more than 5k a month :-)

« Reply #13 on: September 09, 2013, 10:12 »
-1
I don't see the logic in this kind of business plan..

If someone wanted to buy my vectors, I would probably not sell it for less than what I expect to make in 50 years..

how clever would it be to pay me 50 years' potential revenue in advance?  :D

« Reply #14 on: September 09, 2013, 10:27 »
+1
;
« Last Edit: May 12, 2014, 10:53 by Audi 5000 »

« Reply #15 on: September 09, 2013, 10:34 »
0
I don't see the logic in this kind of business plan..

If someone wanted to buy my vectors, I would probably not sell it for less than what I expect to make in 50 years..

how clever would it be to pay me 50 years' potential revenue in advance?  :D
Well in that case I'll sell you my portfolio for half that, 25 years earnings.

3 years here (not kidding)

« Reply #16 on: September 09, 2013, 11:03 »
0
I don't see the logic in this kind of business plan..

If someone wanted to buy my vectors, I would probably not sell it for less than what I expect to make in 50 years..

how clever would it be to pay me 50 years' potential revenue in advance?  :D
Well in that case I'll sell you my portfolio for half that, 25 years earnings.

obviously, I am not interested in buying anyone's port as clearly stated in my post that I find this kind of business plan ridiculous.. :)

I am not buying.. I wouldn't even pay you 1 years worth of earnings..

but if anyone is nuts enough,and interested in buying mine, I will sell it for 50 years' earnings.. that's my price.. not my recommendation.. if anyone is willing to pay, I will take it.. :)

« Reply #17 on: September 09, 2013, 11:10 »
0
;
« Last Edit: May 12, 2014, 10:53 by Audi 5000 »

« Reply #18 on: September 09, 2013, 11:25 »
0
I don't see the logic in this kind of business plan..

If someone wanted to buy my vectors, I would probably not sell it for less than what I expect to make in 50 years..

how clever would it be to pay me 50 years' potential revenue in advance?  :D
Well in that case I'll sell you my portfolio for half that, 25 years earnings.

obviously, I am not interested in buying anyone's port as clearly stated in my post that I find this kind of business plan ridiculous.. :)

I am not buying.. I wouldn't even pay you 1 years worth of earnings..

but if anyone is nuts enough,and interested in buying mine, I will sell it for 50 years' earnings.. that's my price.. not my recommendation.. if anyone is willing to pay, I will take it.. :)
The logic is simple.  Some people want/need money in the present while others can wait 10 years to get it.  Some people are willing to sell 10+ years of earnings for 5 years up front, it's a risk but both parties can benefit from this kind of deal.  If someone would offer me 5 years of earnings I might take it even if I was guaranteed to make 50% more over 10 years.

I understand that logic but I am "really" not interested in selling my port for any amount..

I have enough vectors to run my own sites and selling my work means "bye bye my websites" until I draw as many vectors again..

and that's the risk I don't want to take, because who can say the traffic my sites get will not explode in a year which will cause an explosion in earnings too.. I have no guarantee that it will happen but I am more interested in finding out.. more traffic means more sales.. and the same port can possibly make much more than it is currently making..

if I am going to give up that possibility, I am going to ask for big bucks..

so let me correct what I said earlier: I understand the logic "for you", but makes no sense "for me"  :D
« Last Edit: September 09, 2013, 12:32 by cidepix »

« Reply #19 on: September 09, 2013, 12:26 »
0
If someone offered me 50 years up front I would bite their hand off!  ;D

As others have pointed out there are many reasons why people sell, some good, some bad.

TE

« Reply #20 on: September 09, 2013, 14:22 »
0
If someone offered me 50 years up front I would bite their hand off!  ;D

As others have pointed out there are many reasons why people sell, some good, some bad.

TE

just for curiosity, how many years of income are you willing to pay?

« Reply #21 on: September 09, 2013, 15:00 »
-2
If someone offered me 50 years up front I would bite their hand off!  ;D

As others have pointed out there are many reasons why people sell, some good, some bad.

TE

just for curiosity, how many years of income are you willing to pay?

my guess is 2 months  :D

« Reply #22 on: September 09, 2013, 15:38 »
+1
If someone offered me 50 years up front I would bite their hand off!  ;D

As others have pointed out there are many reasons why people sell, some good, some bad.

TE

just for curiosity, how many years of income are you willing to pay?

Depends on the quality of the material and the history. Ideally looking for a portfolio with 2-3 years of solid sales figures to base any valuation on.

But certainly more than 3 months  :P

« Reply #23 on: September 09, 2013, 16:03 »
-3
see I was right.. someone who asks for rights of your content is never prepared to pay it's proper value..

because If they do, there is no way they profit.. :)

« Reply #24 on: September 09, 2013, 16:20 »
+4
;
« Last Edit: May 12, 2014, 10:52 by Audi 5000 »

« Reply #25 on: September 09, 2013, 16:33 »
+2
see I was right.. someone who asks for rights of your content is never prepared to pay it's proper value..

because If they do, there is no way they profit.. :)

The monetary value of anything is only what someone else is prepared to pay.
« Last Edit: September 09, 2013, 16:40 by TheEngineer »

« Reply #26 on: September 09, 2013, 16:42 »
0
see I was right.. someone who asks for rights of your content is never prepared to pay it's proper value..

because If they do, there is no way they profit.. :)
How were you right?  He didn't say how much he was paying because obviously that depends on the content for sale.   You said last time I explained this that you understood how it's possible to work but a couple hours later you are saying again how there's no way to profit if proper value is paid. 
If my portfolio will make $300,000 over the next ten years does that mean that the proper value of it is $1 million, $300,000, or what?  Say I need money now or I could take $200,000 today and reinvest that money into making more over the next ten years.  There are many ways that both parties can profit off selling a portfolio.   Selling your portfolio gets you real money now as opposed to potential or possible money later on.
I don't really understand the negativity about this, if both sides agree on an amount of money that is beneficial to each side then what's the problem?

totally agree! just need to find a buyer :)

« Reply #27 on: September 09, 2013, 16:45 »
-3
see I was right.. someone who asks for rights of your content is never prepared to pay it's proper value..

because If they do, there is no way they profit.. :)

The monetary value of anything is only what someone else is prepared to pay.

I agree and I don't think you are prepared to pay what tickstock or luis would have liked to receive.. it's just a feeling..

I can write what I feel, right?  :D

« Reply #28 on: September 09, 2013, 16:51 »
-3
see I was right.. someone who asks for rights of your content is never prepared to pay it's proper value..

because If they do, there is no way they profit.. :)
How were you right?  He didn't say how much he was paying because obviously that depends on the content for sale.   You said last time I explained this that you understood how it's possible to work but a couple hours later you are saying again how there's no way to profit if proper value is paid. 
If my portfolio will make $300,000 over the next ten years does that mean that the proper value of it is $1 million, $300,000, or what?  Say I need money now or I could take $200,000 today and reinvest that money into making more over the next ten years.  There are many ways that both parties can profit off selling a portfolio.   Selling your portfolio gets you real money now as opposed to potential or possible money later on.
I don't really understand the negativity about this, if both sides agree on an amount of money that is beneficial to each side then what's the problem?

I did, and still do understand :)

but your evaluation of today will not match the projected results for 2 years from now.. I am not saying you can't profit.. you definitely can (If you get the amount you asked for)

when I said there is no way to profit I meant for the buyer.. for him to profit, he would have to seriously underpay you..

let's say you received a sum equal to your 5 years revenue.. if he pays that, he won't make it back in 5 years.. it's gonna take longer considering that images do not sell as good in their 2nd year, compared to 1st year.. and they are going to sell less and less every year..

if he pays you 5 years, he is lucky if he can make it back in 15 years.. if he can wait that long, o yeah, he can profit.. but I don't think the OP is willing to wait 15 years after paying you 5 year worth of earnings..

« Reply #29 on: September 09, 2013, 16:56 »
+1
see I was right.. someone who asks for rights of your content is never prepared to pay it's proper value..

because If they do, there is no way they profit.. :)

The monetary value of anything is only what someone else is prepared to pay.

I agree and I don't think you are prepared to pay what tickstock or luis would have liked to receive.. it's just a feeling..

I can write what I feel, right?  :D

Of course you can write what you feel, within whatever rules the owner of the forum decides to set.

Why do some people in the US who win the lottery choose to take a smaller lump sum in one payment than the full amount over 20/25 years? Some people prefer the certainty of cash up front.

TE
« Last Edit: September 09, 2013, 17:05 by TheEngineer »

« Reply #30 on: September 09, 2013, 17:05 »
-1
see I was right.. someone who asks for rights of your content is never prepared to pay it's proper value..

because If they do, there is no way they profit.. :)

The monetary value of anything is only what someone else is prepared to pay.

I agree and I don't think you are prepared to pay what tickstock or luis would have liked to receive.. it's just a feeling..

I can write what I feel, right?  :D

Of course you can write what you feel, within whatever rules the owner of the forum decides to set.

Why do some people in the US choose to take a smaller lump sum in one payment than the full amount over 20/25 years? Some people prefer the certainty of cash up front.

TE

either you insist on not getting my point or I should have said it better :)

you are right again.. I agree.. some people indeed prefer the cash up front.. but there is no way for you to profit, unless you underpay the content owner.. because if you trust on "past" sale performance and think it's going to sell as good in the next five years as it was in the last five years, then you go bankrupt..

just to add to injury, there is no guarantee that this business will be on high demand in the next 5 years as it was in the last five years..

it's a big risk and requires for you to "seriously underpay" the current owner..

« Reply #31 on: September 09, 2013, 17:16 »
+2
see I was right.. someone who asks for rights of your content is never prepared to pay it's proper value..

because If they do, there is no way they profit.. :)

The monetary value of anything is only what someone else is prepared to pay.

I agree and I don't think you are prepared to pay what tickstock or luis would have liked to receive.. it's just a feeling..

I can write what I feel, right?  :D

Of course you can write what you feel, within whatever rules the owner of the forum decides to set.

Why do some people in the US choose to take a smaller lump sum in one payment than the full amount over 20/25 years? Some people prefer the certainty of cash up front.

TE

either you insist on not getting my point or I should have said it better :)

you are right again.. I agree.. some people indeed prefer the cash up front.. but there is no way for you to profit, unless you underpay the content owner.. because if you trust on "past" sale performance and think it's going to sell as good in the next five years as it was in the last five years, then you go bankrupt..

just to add to injury, there is no guarantee that this business will be on high demand in the next 5 years as it was in the last five years..

it's a big risk and requires for you to "seriously underpay" the current owner..

Sorry cidepix I think it is you who are missing the point.

As you yourself say I am taking a risk by buying a portfolio. If I make an offer to a seller and they think it is not enough then they take a risk that sales fall over the next few years.

If a buyer and a seller agree a price then that is the value of the portfolio. You might value your portfolio at 50 years of income but if no-one will pay that price then it is not worth 50 years of income to anyone other than you.

Of course other factors (such as emotion) come in to play. I have a watch that would sell for $100 if I put it on Ebay. It belonged to my dead grandfather and so the watch is "worth" far more than $100 to me in sentimental value.

« Reply #32 on: September 09, 2013, 17:31 »
-2
yes I am emotional about my work.. I don't like the idea of selling exclusive rights..

btw, you can't buy/sell copyrights, as the creator of the content will not change with a transaction.. you can buy/sell exclusive commercial rights..

the content creator can always claim s/he is the creator of the content as long as s/he has proof for it..
« Last Edit: September 09, 2013, 17:40 by cidepix »

« Reply #33 on: September 09, 2013, 17:43 »
+1
yes I am emotional about my work.. I don't like the idea of selling exclusive rights..

I had realised that  ;D

btw, you can't buy/sell copyrights, as the creator of the content will not change with a transaction.. you can buy/sell exclusive commercial rights..

the content creator can always claim he is the creator of the content as long as s/he has proof for it..

Actually you can under the concept of "work for hire" (US Law - United States Copyright Act 1976)

TE

« Reply #34 on: September 09, 2013, 17:50 »
+7
stock portfolios are bought and sold 'all the time'.  All the time in quotes as it isn't literally 'all the time' but it certainly isn't uncommon.  How did Getty get so much wholey owned content? 

MonkeyBusiness sold all their old content (before they started in microstock) to Getty (Bananastock) and did very well.

It's just a matter of a buyer and seller agreeing on what the port. is worth.  The buyer is taking the risk of the industry going downhill and pays less for the content because of that.  If it was a guaranteed income stream then it would be more like a term deposit where 30 years income is more on par.  The more risk the less X-income that anyone is willing to risk. 

Same deal with buying and selling websites.  You'd think someone is crazy to sell a site making $2000/month but the income is pretty risk and can stop in a day if google changes things.  10-24x monthly income is pretty par for the course.  Stock photos wouldn't be too different.

« Reply #35 on: September 09, 2013, 17:54 »
-1
that's more like selling commercial rights..

http://www.ipo.gov.uk/types/copy/c-manage/c-useenforce/c-use/c-sell.htm
"You should note that with certain copyright material even if the creator sells the copyright in the work they will still have moral rights. This means that for instance the creator will still have the right to be identified as the author (providing he had claimed that right previously) and to object to any derogatory treatment of the work.  Moral rights in a work can not be transferred or 'assigned' but a creator is entitled to waive those rights."


so yes, you can buy/sell, but will never really own it as the original creator did.. I didn't read the US copyright act.. this is a UK site.. so I am not sure how much they differ..

« Reply #36 on: September 09, 2013, 17:58 »
0
http://www.copyright.gov/title17/92chap2.html

Quote
(b) Works Made for Hire. In   the   case   of   a   work   made   for   hire,   the   employer or other person for whom the work was prepared is considered the author for purposes of this title, and, unless the parties have expressly agreed otherwise in a written instrument signed by them, owns all of the rights comprised in the copyright.


Quote
(1) The ownership of a copyright may be transferred in whole or in part by any means of conveyance or by operation of law, and may be bequeathed by will or pass as personal property by the applicable laws of intestate succession.

« Reply #37 on: September 09, 2013, 18:04 »
-1
Quote
(b) Works Made for Hire. In   the   case   of   a   work   made   for   hire,   the   employer or other person for whom the work was prepared is considered the author for purposes of this title, and, unless the parties have expressly agreed otherwise in a written instrument signed by them, owns all of the rights comprised in the copyright.

- this is true if the person who created the content was your employee or you hired him to create the content for you..

which does not directly apply to buying/selling stock portfolios.. so if you bought luis' work, he would still remain the creator of the content..

if he was your employee and created the work while working for you, then you could say that you created the content..

but now you can't.. because he was previously known as the creator of the content and that doesn't change with copyright transfer..

« Reply #38 on: September 09, 2013, 18:15 »
0
Quote
Although in most cases the economic and moral rights
belong to the person who creates the work (see pg 8 ), copyright is a form of property, which, like physical
property, can be sold, bought, inherited or otherwise
transferred, wholly or in part. A copyright owner can do a
lot with their copyright.


http://www.ipo.gov.uk/c-essential.pdf

« Reply #39 on: September 09, 2013, 18:28 »
0
Quote
Although in most cases the economic and moral rights
belong to the person who creates the work (see pg 8 ), copyright is a form of property, which, like physical
property, can be sold, bought, inherited or otherwise
transferred, wholly or in part. A copyright owner can do a
lot with their copyright.


http://www.ipo.gov.uk/c-essential.pdf


I don't disagree with your points.. there is a reason you pay money for the content so you should have all the economic rights..

all I am saying is that the creator does not change, but all others rights can of course be sold or transferred..

I wonder what getty calls their MonkeyBusiness collection?

edit: I guess it's Bananastock as I see on leaf's post.. so they acknowledge the original creator even though they bought it..
« Last Edit: September 09, 2013, 18:31 by cidepix »

« Reply #40 on: September 09, 2013, 18:33 »
0
Quote
Although in most cases the economic and moral rights
belong to the person who creates the work (see pg 8 ), copyright is a form of property, which, like physical
property, can be sold, bought, inherited or otherwise
transferred, wholly or in part. A copyright owner can do a
lot with their copyright.


http://www.ipo.gov.uk/c-essential.pdf


I don't disagree with your points.. there is a reason you pay money for the content so you should have all the economic rights..

all I am saying is that the creator does not change, but all others rights can of course be sold or transferred..

I wonder what getty calls their MonkeyBusiness collection?

edit: I guess it's Bananastock as I see on leaf's post.. so they acknowledge the original creator even though they bought it..


I'm guessing they keep that simply because people know the brand.  Old buyers want bananastock images and have been customers a lont time.  They'll follow the brand to the new store house.

« Reply #41 on: September 09, 2013, 18:36 »
+1
Quote
Although in most cases the economic and moral rights
belong to the person who creates the work (see pg 8 ), copyright is a form of property, which, like physical
property, can be sold, bought, inherited or otherwise
transferred, wholly or in part. A copyright owner can do a
lot with their copyright.


http://www.ipo.gov.uk/c-essential.pdf


I don't disagree with your points.. there is a reason you pay money for the content so you should have all the economic rights..

all I am saying is that the creator does not change, but all others rights can of course be sold or transferred..

I wonder what getty calls their MonkeyBusiness collection?

edit: I guess it's Bananastock as I see on leaf's post.. so they acknowledge the original creator even though they bought it..


Absolutely, the creator does not change, but the copyright can be bought and sold.

Noedelhap

  • www.colincramm.com

« Reply #42 on: September 13, 2013, 17:58 »
0
How much would you be willing to pay for 6 freshly produced cg video files that haven't garnered any sales yet?

« Reply #43 on: September 14, 2013, 03:04 »
0
How much would you be willing to pay for 6 freshly produced cg video files that haven't garnered any sales yet?

Prefer to look at existing portfolios with sales but I would look at the material based on what it would cost me to get it produced on a "work for hire" basis.

PM more details if you like.

« Reply #44 on: November 12, 2014, 13:01 »
+1
Just thought I would give this a little bump!

I have now purchased several portfolios and have a contract drawn up by my lawyer to cover the sale / purchase.

I am principally interested in buying portfolios of videos and usually pay around 2 years worth of sales income.

PM me if interested.

Thanks

TE

« Reply #45 on: November 16, 2014, 09:55 »
0
Just thought I would give this a little bump!

I have now purchased several portfolios and have a contract drawn up by my lawyer to cover the sale / purchase.

I am principally interested in buying portfolios of videos and usually pay around 2 years worth of sales income.

PM me if interested.

Thanks

TE

It sounds interesting, are you buying CG animation portfolio?
I've sent you PM via P5 by the way.

foxtrotcommando

« Reply #46 on: November 24, 2014, 12:34 »
0
It's definitely tempting, but I think I can market my content well enough. I also don't have a large portfolio yet, but I might contact you in a few months if you're still interested!

« Reply #47 on: March 20, 2015, 08:59 »
0
I am principally interested in buying portfolios of videos and usually pay around 2 years worth of sales income.

In the last two years I bought 5 microstock portfolios, and I also bought them for 2 years worth of sales incomes based on the last year's revenue. (sometime it ends up 3 years when less profitable).

Many who sells wants either:
- Out of this business: They cash out and invest in new opportunities which gives them 2 years to start something they like to do more, or is more profitable.
- Want to buy new equipment, and redo a better and higher quality portfolio. When I buy, I base myself on the income it generates more than on the quality of the work. However creators sometimes don't like what they produced 4 years ago, and wish to do a new start with high end equipment.
- Cash out and develop and start a new business.

I currently have an offer from a company who has 50k high end vector illustration in a selected, and generates 150k to 200k income yearly. Even if it's profitable they still wish to cash out and spend time in new technologies development like video streaming on demand.

Whoever wish to sell has their own reasons. We buy the copyrights of the files so that we can continue generating income from there. We take some risk but in the we trust Microstock will not change drastically in the 2-3 years following the transaction to start making profit.

If you are interested in an exit from this business and wish to negotiate the sale of your portfolio you can contact me in PM. I would love to have a Photo portfolio, but I will also buy Video or Illustrations portfolio. I prefer portfolios who generates from 1500$ to 5000$ per month and will pay from 2 to 3 years income depending on possibility to expand the portfolio through other sites or not (if the portfolio is submitted to all main sites or not).

Thanks!


 

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