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Author Topic: What fps sells best?  (Read 13036 times)

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fotorob

  • I am a professional stock photographer

« on: May 10, 2011, 03:31 »
0
Hello,

usually I save my footage clips for agencies from my Canon 5D Mark II as

1920 x 1080 pixel (Full HD)
25fps
no sound
MotionJPEG B
.mov Container

Now I've read at some blogs that they recommend either PhotoJPG instead of Motion JPG for footage and another frame rate, usually 29,97fps.

So I am wondering:
What frame rate sells best? And why?

Thanks in advance,
Robert


« Reply #1 on: May 10, 2011, 04:28 »
0
MotionJpeg is best suited for interlaced footage and PhotoJpeg for progressive footage. Since the Canon 5DmkII record footage as progressive the PhotoJpeg codec is better suited.

I am no expert on footage, but as I understand it, it is easier to convert footage from 29.97 (NTSC) frames to 25 (PAL), than the other way round. For this reason it is usually better to shoot at 29.97, unless you specifically shoot for the European market that use the PAL standard.

« Reply #2 on: May 10, 2011, 08:37 »
0
MotionJpeg is best suited for interlaced footage and PhotoJpeg for progressive footage. Since the Canon 5DmkII record footage as progressive the PhotoJpeg codec is better suited.

I am no expert on footage, but as I understand it, it is easier to convert footage from 29.97 (NTSC) frames to 25 (PAL), than the other way round. For this reason it is usually better to shoot at 29.97, unless you specifically shoot for the European market that use the PAL standard.

That's correct. By submitting 30fps you're directly supplying to the biggest video market in the world. Whoever else needs 25fps, can easily slow it down to that.

If you record natively 25fps and convert it to 30fps you inevitably speed up the video which won't look great.

On the other hand when you convert it down from 30fps to 25 fps the video becomes a little bit slower which in most instances is not really distracting.
« Last Edit: May 10, 2011, 08:43 by click_click »

« Reply #3 on: May 10, 2011, 09:46 »
0
Just so that you know, I have no affiliation with the website that I'm about to mention.

If you're interested in learning more about shooting video with your 5D, check out the forum at www.cinema5D.com. There are some extremely knowledgeable people over there and they're all using the same camera, so there's lots to be learned!

« Reply #4 on: May 11, 2011, 06:51 »
0
I set my camera to 25fps for all the clips I do of places around the UK, as it's PAL over here.  If I do something that might be purchased outside the Europe, I switch to 29.97fps.  I might be better off just doing 29.97fps but I thought I might want to make my own DVD's and blu-rays one day, so it will be easier for me if I stick with 25fps.

« Reply #5 on: May 11, 2011, 09:18 »
0
This has to be the most contested area of video clip production. Higher end sales outlets prefer 24fps and I here say it converts easiest to 25fps or 30fps if need be. I shoot mostly 30fps now as it does seem to have the greatest need but sell 24 fps clips as well. Toss a coin.

« Reply #6 on: May 11, 2011, 21:40 »
0
Heh seams that
iSmacks has new rules about framings...
Seam they use old Intel 286 or 386 processors who has bug in ADDing before 1999/2000 glitch.
« Last Edit: May 11, 2011, 21:51 by Suljo »

« Reply #7 on: May 11, 2011, 23:14 »
0
^^  :D

rinderart

« Reply #8 on: September 30, 2011, 16:57 »
0
MotionJpeg is best suited for interlaced footage and PhotoJpeg for progressive footage. Since the Canon 5DmkII record footage as progressive the PhotoJpeg codec is better suited.

I am no expert on footage, but as I understand it, it is easier to convert footage from 29.97 (NTSC) frames to 25 (PAL), than the other way round. For this reason it is usually better to shoot at 29.97, unless you specifically shoot for the European market that use the PAL standard.

Correct.

« Reply #9 on: December 16, 2011, 15:10 »
0
I sell motion graphics only and I really can not see any big difference in sales volume between 25, 29.97 and 30 fps

rinderart

« Reply #10 on: December 28, 2011, 17:49 »
0
MotionJpeg is best suited for interlaced footage and PhotoJpeg for progressive footage. Since the Canon 5DmkII record footage as progressive the PhotoJpeg codec is better suited.

I am no expert on footage, but as I understand it, it is easier to convert footage from 29.97 (NTSC) frames to 25 (PAL), than the other way round. For this reason it is usually better to shoot at 29.97, unless you specifically shoot for the European market that use the PAL standard.

Agree.

« Reply #11 on: March 23, 2012, 13:12 »
0

In case you have a clip at both frame rates (e.g. a 3d animation), is it ok to submit the same video at 25 AND 29.97fps? Or one will be rejected?

« Reply #12 on: March 23, 2012, 13:24 »
0
What about the Panasonic HDC-TM900?

Im trying to film but i always get rejections because of light.

Any suggestion please let me know.

Many thanks.

« Reply #13 on: June 22, 2012, 17:57 »
+1
This comes up from time to time.  The most sold video contributor portfolio Simonkr shoots everything at 24p.   He seems to sell like crazy just surpassing 100k clips.

I am beginning to think that 24p is the better option for the world market right now while 30 or 29.97 is best for North America. 

I mostly shoot at 30p but I am beginning to think 24p is just as good for converting to PAL and or NTSC.   One big aspect to consider is that web video loves 30p as it can also use 15p if on a slower connection.

However portable and digital devices  just don't care about frame rates since they can display them all to 60hz with no problems.

Maybe nature shots work better at 30p while people shots at 24p.    It would be great to have a real graph from sites on what constitutes the best frame rate bet.

« Reply #14 on: June 24, 2012, 10:53 »
0
James, i liked your comments. Regarding simonkr, his(?) stuff is highly commercial so it's not surprising it  sells very well. I'm not sure frame rate can be attributed to his success.

« Reply #15 on: June 24, 2012, 11:50 »
+1
24p footage is generally deemed to be more "cinematic" for a film look, which is look at as higher-end, so shooting 24p is a good option in many cases, and the PAL/NTSC issue is minimized.

The conversion of 30/29.97 fps footage from 25fps doesn't imply that the motion will be slowed down (it can be done this way, but the true conversion keeps the speed the same.


 

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