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Author Topic: Stock footage kit  (Read 8374 times)

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« on: February 26, 2008, 05:26 »
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Also posted to shutterstock:

I'm planning to shoot some SD with my video cam and see if it gets accepted, but I've got some ideas for some wacky time-lapse type stuff shot with my 5D.

From a Canon 5D, to make footage, what software do I need? I'm running a mac, could I do it with iMovie?

Will I be able to create HD footage with this sort of method?

Any help appreciated!
« Last Edit: February 26, 2008, 13:54 by Seren »


« Reply #1 on: February 26, 2008, 05:37 »
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I posted over at SS, but honestly I check here more often. If you have any more questions, I'd be glad to help. You can post or you can e-mail me at: [email protected]

RT


« Reply #2 on: February 26, 2008, 05:57 »
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Hi,

I'm no expert on this but I've done some time lapse stuff for clients before and what I use is a Canon TC-80N3 remote, it's designed for this, you'll have to check they work with a 5D and they're not cheap but it is a fantastic little gadget, just set up your camera, put the required time intervals in and walk away, the remote does the rest.

As for software, I'd have thought iMovies is fine, I've used Premier elements.

« Reply #3 on: February 26, 2008, 07:16 »
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I would be very cautious about using a 5D for time lapse video.  It can be a very expensive proposition.

If I remember correctly, the 5D has a shutter life of 100,000 clicks.  That would be used up very quickly by doing time lapse video.  For example, a 30 second video clip at 30 fps would be 900 images.  If you only shoot ten (10) 30-second videos, then you have just used up 9,000 shutter cycles or almost 10% of your camera's estimated life.

« Reply #4 on: February 26, 2008, 07:21 »
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True enough.  Guess I'll use my 350D then!  Should be more than good enough for this sort of thing.

I would be very cautious about using a 5D for time lapse video.  It can be a very expensive proposition.

If I remember correctly, the 5D has a shutter life of 100,000 clicks.  That would be used up very quickly by doing time lapse video.  For example, a 30 second video clip at 30 fps would be 900 images.  If you only shoot ten (10) 30-second videos, then you have just used up 9,000 shutter cycles or almost 10% of your camera's estimated life.


« Reply #5 on: February 26, 2008, 07:34 »
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Rebels are great for timelapse! Full controll, plenty of resolution, and cheap enough to replace if necessary.

Even better (as far as camera life is concerned) are the powershot series. There is no shutter to worry about! The only drawback I've found with my G2 is that it won't allow manual focus when tethered to a computer, newer models may not have this issue though.

« Reply #6 on: February 26, 2008, 08:32 »
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The Rebel is already on it's last legs, although it's only had 10,000 or so shutter accutations.  Perfect candidate for time lapse!

Thinking about compacts, I wonder how my panasonic lumix lx2 or whatever it is compares to my video recorder?  My video recorder is about four years old now, so it might be comparable!  I'll have to investigate.

« Reply #7 on: February 26, 2008, 13:56 »
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As a further question (as I've just seen how cheap they have become), how would a Canon HV20 do for stock shooting?  Is it pretty reliable?  I don't know if the problems are similar to photography with regards to noise and things, but how does it do?

I'd like to get one for shooting various things, but kayaking is a big one on my list.

Anything else around the 600 that you would recommend over the HV20?  Would any of my Canon camera accessories (batteries etc) fit the video cam?

So many questions...

« Reply #8 on: February 26, 2008, 16:07 »
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The HV20 would be a good start for stock. In fact, with the current footage prices, it would be hard to suggest spending much more, although if you get serious, you will want a camera that gives you more control.

In another thread, I compared the HV series to a point and shoot camera (compact, meant for full auto use), while the XH/XL series are like an SLR in terms of features and manual control (and size). They also cost three times the HV20, or more.

I primarily shoot timelapse, but for my live footage I use an HV10. The image quality is comparable to the HV20 from what I've heard. In good light, the picture is fantastic, in low light there is quite a bit of grain, sound is generally poor. The HV20 allows audio input from an external mic, a great feature. The HV20, unlike the HV10, takes the same batteries as the Rebel XT and XTi, the BP-2L series, although you may want to get a higher capacity battery. For kayaking, you will definitely need a waterproof housing, which will add a bit to the cost.  Most consumer video cams can't even handle a light rain without burning out the firewire port, or something equally fatal.

Overall, the HV20 would be a great choice, but be prepared to work a bit harder to get the same kind of shots you're used to getting with an SLR.

« Reply #9 on: February 26, 2008, 17:27 »
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I guess the videos made in my Powershot A620 (640x480, 30fps) do not meet footage requirements?

Pity, as I have some decent videos panning through a landscape.

Regards,
Adelaide


 

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