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Author Topic: Commercial value?  (Read 846 times)

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EO

« on: June 08, 2019, 13:59 »
+2
Do you see any commercial value in this illustration? Why or why not? I feel like people illustrations do best when they look like all the others out there. Is there any benefit to developing a different style?

http://imgur.com/QjjKF51


SpaceStockFootage

  • Space, Sci-Fi and Astronomy Related Stock Footage

« Reply #1 on: June 08, 2019, 14:26 »
+2
I'm sure if somebody is looking to represent people born with no eyes, in their marketing... then you'll be their first port of call! They do look really good though!

« Reply #2 on: June 08, 2019, 15:07 »
0
I like it.  Very Money magazinish.

« Reply #3 on: June 08, 2019, 19:30 »
0
Very beautiful. Since you asked about commercial value, I'd say it is beautiful but low commercial value. Think about it, just how often is a buyer looking for someone folding laundry, versus, an illustration about 'small business'. Maybe you can draw a row of people in different occupation in your illustration style. That I think would be more commonly searched. My 2 cents.

« Reply #4 on: June 08, 2019, 19:39 »
0
I like it. Very generic. Positive. Middle income. Middle age. And the "action" you chose is interesting. Makes me think they're giving clothing to a needy organization. Or, getting ready for some positive changes in their lives. Will it find buyers? Hard to say. If that's a style you want to try to market I say go for it.   

« Reply #5 on: June 08, 2019, 21:56 »
0
I'd say it has commercial value. Two black people doing laundry - could be used for laundry/cleaning commercials/flyers/etc, race related material (i.e., black families, events, etc - as a stretch - the guy 'could' look a bit east indian), family event flyers, looks like it could either be a husband/wife, or father/daughter (because of the grey hair), could be for a sports team because of the jersey and white soccer socks (although it looks like he is into football, and she into soccer), could be for afro day, could be unpacking boxes, etc, etc...

you don't 'necessarily' need to have eyes, because it is 'stylistic' - although that is one of the things I did notice (woman not so much, because her hair 'could' be covering them, whereas the guy was more noticeable)...

so yes, lots of commercial value...

« Reply #6 on: June 09, 2019, 03:07 »
0
I should have answered 10-15 minutes ago but scrolled down and again and again and then clicked...:P

If I may comment my first thought was a couple waiting a baby.
I do not know on commercial value but to me seems really good
in terms of mental lines leading the eye.

:)

Noedelhap

  • www.colincramm.com

« Reply #7 on: June 09, 2019, 05:43 »
0
It's a nice illustration but its concept is a bit unclear to me. Are they folding laundry (then why are they sitting crosslegged), are they unpacking boxes from moving to another place, are they just checking clothes they received from charity...Perhaps that's why it could be used for different things... On the other hand, the combination of things depicted (looking at the people, what they're doing and in what position) is kind of specific, so I wouldn't expect too many downloads.

EO

« Reply #8 on: June 09, 2019, 09:20 »
0
Thanks for all the replies. There's a lot of food for thought here. I guess where I'm having the most trouble is in thinking like a buyer without creating the thousandth version of the same illustrations already available. Am I overly concerned about market saturation?

I started out selling stock art to the individual buyer--social media, blogs, etc. But I recognize the big agencies like Adobe and Shutterstock have different clientele and I don't quite have a handle on their needs. Aside from looking at top sellers, how can I learn more about how businesses/industries choose and use stock art especially on these subscription models? Much of what I've read is out of date and emphasize selling decorative sets.

Thanks again--and I'll certainly take the eyes thing into consideration!

« Reply #9 on: June 09, 2019, 15:15 »
+1
Thanks for all the replies. There's a lot of food for thought here. I guess where I'm having the most trouble is in thinking like a buyer without creating the thousandth version of the same illustrations already available. Am I overly concerned about market saturation?

I started out selling stock art to the individual buyer--social media, blogs, etc. But I recognize the big agencies like Adobe and Shutterstock have different clientele and I don't quite have a handle on their needs. Aside from looking at top sellers, how can I learn more about how businesses/industries choose and use stock art especially on these subscription models? Much of what I've read is out of date and emphasize selling decorative sets.

Thanks again--and I'll certainly take the eyes thing into consideration!

I think you should do beautiful illustrated concepts that the maximum of people might be interested in, not beautiful illustrated concepts that only a few random people might be interested in. AFAIK, the number category is business. You should do business illustrations.

Shelma1

« Reply #10 on: June 09, 2019, 15:58 »
+4
I disagree with many of the opinions here. Many subjects have been done to death, and its virtually impossible to compete. Maybe people folding laundry will sell well because there arent many depictions of it. (I havent checked.) The only way to find out is to upload and see.

« Reply #11 on: June 09, 2019, 18:00 »
0
I upload the same type of photos over and over again, year after year, over a decade now. I sell tons of this stuff. If this stuff didn't sell day in and day out, year after year, I would stop.

« Reply #12 on: June 10, 2019, 02:28 »
+1
If you are asking about the style, yes lots of commercial value to it. Try producing a few illustrations in that style covering lifestyle, medical and business topics and I'm sure you will see results.

« Reply #13 on: June 10, 2019, 17:36 »
+2
The fact that people thought folding laundry moving new home packing unpacking new baby donating charity means that there are quite a few concepts you can keyword this for. Very nice illustration it looks authentic not so stocky which is good. The lack of eyes might make your style noticeable or it might hurt depends on the buyer. Only way to know is to get it online. Think about other activities. Maybe try some in this style with eyes compare how they sell. But really nicely done and theres a market for moving new home new baby etc. even if its not as large as the very saturated business concepts. And you could put them at desks, in business meetings too but I like this more outside the box. Hiking, jogging so many things. Good luck.

EO

« Reply #14 on: June 11, 2019, 13:25 »
0
I upload the same type of photos over and over again, year after year, over a decade now. I sell tons of this stuff. If this stuff didn't sell day in and day out, year after year, I would stop.

Fascinating. How do you find fresh ways of covering the same subjects?

Lots of great ideas here in the thread. I hadn't even thought of using some of those keywords. I'll definitely try to compare sales of illustrations with and without eyes. And overall I'm getting that I need to keep my portfolio balanced, with both uniqueness and salebility in mind.

Also thanks a lot for the complements on style quality. I worked really hard on it without many people to get feedback from, so it's helpful to know I'm at least on the right track. :)

« Reply #15 on: June 11, 2019, 14:03 »
0
I upload the same type of photos over and over again, year after year, over a decade now. I sell tons of this stuff. If this stuff didn't sell day in and day out, year after year, I would stop.

Fascinating. How do you find fresh ways of covering the same subjects?

Lots of great ideas here in the thread. I hadn't even thought of using some of those keywords. I'll definitely try to compare sales of illustrations with and without eyes. And overall I'm getting that I need to keep my portfolio balanced, with both uniqueness and salebility in mind.

Also thanks a lot for the complements on style quality. I worked really hard on it without many people to get feedback from, so it's helpful to know I'm at least on the right track. :)

Different models doing the same poses. There is only so many poses that people actually buy, so then the next thing to do is to change models. For you with illustrations, it might be changing out background colors, mixing and matching elements from different illustrations youve already done, so then you are recycling some of your past work. Also you can change skin color, sometimes a customer is looking for a dark skin person and sometimes a light skin person, sometimes long hair, sometimes short.

EO

« Reply #16 on: June 13, 2019, 07:32 »
0
Thanks, this is all very helpful!


 

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