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Author Topic: RETRO FEEL  (Read 2375 times)

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« on: January 05, 2016, 09:22 »
0
Dear Readers - I'd like to give my vectors a more vintage/retro feel by adding some textures eg. make a book cover design look grubby and well read.

There are tutorials out there but most talk about importing a texture file from PS - which is fine but none of them cover whether this creates bitmaps and if so how to overcome it to avoid bitmap rejections. Is it a question of just expanding appearance? Are there alternatives inside Illustrator I can use? Anyone found a decent tut that might help?

(The attached is similar to the effect I am trying to reproduce)

Pointers/Suggestions much appreciated.......Ed




Shelma1

« Reply #1 on: January 05, 2016, 09:58 »
+1
You can scan (or photograph) a texture and do a live trace, or use the Illustrator brushes that look like paint or ink at a large width and expand those. If you scan or photograph be careful that there's no copyright. iStock will insist you tell them where you get any grunge textures or they will reject your images.

I'm sure other illustrators have more ideas.

« Reply #2 on: January 05, 2016, 10:15 »
0
You can scan (or photograph) a texture and do a live trace, or use the Illustrator brushes that look like paint or ink at a large width and expand those. If you scan or photograph be careful that there's no copyright. iStock will insist you tell them where you get any grunge textures or they will reject your images.

I'm sure other illustrators have more ideas.

Thanks for the help. I've got photos in my own port I can use. I'll have a look at the brushes also.

« Reply #3 on: January 05, 2016, 11:21 »
+1
You can create textures in illustrator but it isnt the best way to go about it. Thats why photoshop is the preferred choice. If its not a filter or brush inside illustrator, all those individual shapes creates a big file size.

I do create artwork for screen printing and usually go back and forth between both programs. For instance, to get a nice halftone effect, i would create some gradients in illustrator greyscale. copy and paste that greyscale shape into photoshop. Convert that greyscale image to a bitmap image. Import that bitmap image into illustrator and if i have to, i would convert that bitmap image into vector format.

This method is how i create distressed looks in illustrator for certain projects. I do this is in 2-3 shades of the color (usually use different splat bitmap effects) and you get a nice vector distressed look.

« Reply #4 on: January 05, 2016, 11:40 »
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I think that there are only two solutions:
1) You convert your texture in path with live trace in Illustrator, but you risk to loose a lot of details, or to get a file with so much points that the weight will be over the acceptable limit.
2) You export the whole image (texture + vector) to jpeg loosing the advantage of a vectorial file. Consider that if you can produce a 25 Mpixels jpeg you do not really need a vectorial file for most of the uses.
Personally I prefer to use the second solution.

« Reply #5 on: January 05, 2016, 13:47 »
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VB inc and Chichikov.......All good stuff to try out and see what works best for me. Thanks for the input.

« Reply #6 on: January 05, 2016, 14:13 »
+1
Is like what everybody said....

For a realistic texture the best is to have the texture in black and white bitmap and use it with adobe illustrator, I know some people in silk screen who use this method when they photograph a physical object for the texture - because you are able to get all the details - however that will not be accepted into microstock... so you would have to vectorize.

Like everybody said people do "expand" fill so the TIF or JPG  and that will become a vector, and the only downsize is that you will lose some detail in the process.

You will have to play with the settings of the live tracing feature  to see how much of the detail you are willing to lose - because if you get a lot of detail, that's a lot of anchor points and ---that make files pretty big,  in some cases that will slow down some computers...I did that once to get a realistic texture, and it was too slow to work with it.


« Reply #7 on: January 05, 2016, 16:55 »
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Thanks Monica. I'll keep an eye on the anchor points.


 

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