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Author Topic: "Professional" site using all stolen watermarked images  (Read 9300 times)

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« Reply #25 on: April 03, 2018, 08:31 »
0
If you had a watermark in my images on your site, I would be perfectly fine with that.

lol, don't worry about it.

a) It's probably a placeholder. ANY professional (real) site would not get business if they had 'shutterstock' all watermarked over it.
b) If they ARE a real site trying to get busienss, they probably don't have the money anyways to pay for it - and it is advertising for you.
c) Also - asfaik, they aren't "stolen" either. Pretty much every stock site lets you download preview/watermarked images/video/etc.

a) don't know if it's a placeholder, doesn't matter, illegal use
b) No it's not advertising, it's stealing
c) Wrong, downloading a sample and using it are far different.

Can I have some of your best images to use on my website? I promise to mention your name if I ever make some money. Sorry can't afford to pay but you'll get exposure, views, and maybe credit.  ;D


« Reply #26 on: April 03, 2018, 08:55 »
0
If you had a watermark in my images on your site, I would be perfectly fine with that.

Good to know!  ;)

But it doesn't really change whether it's legal or not, unless the image came from your personal site where you clearly state: "no need to pay if you use watermarked version in any situation".

« Reply #27 on: April 03, 2018, 09:15 »
0
I'm trying to say though - unless the site to the end user explicitly states "preview images may not be used on websites" (which I have not seen from the license agreements I've reviewed), there's not really any enforceability. And even if that was written - it doesn't necessarily mean that it is enforceable, simply because there is the understanding that a preview is an 'evaluation' (incentive to get someone to purchase the full version). As for DMCA notices, it is supposed to apply to full copyrighted content.

It's like say having a bag of cookies for sale in costco, and getting mad at costco because they are giving out free samples to 'non-paying' customers. Sure, some will never have an intention of buying that brand of cookies whatsoever. But others, they think, mm these are good cookies, and then buy them, maybe even buy a few and tell some friends.

I guess to each his own. If you want to get upset because someone is using watermarked content on their site, then go ahead and get upset and chase after every single person doing that. I feel time would be better spent creating new content and looking for paying customers, but - it's your choice.


« Reply #28 on: April 03, 2018, 09:21 »
+2
I'm trying to say though - unless the site to the end user explicitly states "preview images may not be used on websites" (which I have not seen from the license agreements I've reviewed), there's not really any enforceability.

Here's what I found after 3 seconds spent searching, it's for Shutterstock footage:

"A FOOTAGE COMP LICENSE grants you the right to use watermarked, low resolution Footage as a comp (the "Comp Footage") solely in test, sample, comp, or rough cut evaluation materials. Footage Comp Licenses do not permit you to display or distribute to the public or incorporated into any final materials any such Footage. Comp Footage can be edited, but you may not remove or alter the Shutterstock watermark."

I mean, OF COURSE previews are not allowed in final materials. It's just so obvious I can't even believe you question it.

From Fotolia (answer to question):

"Yes, you can try out Fotolia images by downloading the low-resolution, watermarked version for mock-up purposes only. You can pay when you decide to license the image. However, you may not use a Comp image in the finished product."

---

...and your cookie analogy...

No, it's like giving out free images to get people to like your website. Which is exactly what happens. But it's not the same images...
« Last Edit: April 03, 2018, 09:32 by increasingdifficulty »

« Reply #29 on: April 03, 2018, 09:27 »
0
Lol yeah... Okay. And your point?

It doesn't explicitly say the materials "cannot be used on websites". And for the site in question - they could simply argue it is preview/evaluation site. Companies actually do create mock up sites not intended for public use (but due to the nature of the internet, can be indexed in search engines and be discovered). Secondly, since a user can easily download the *preview* images without actually accepting the license agreement (you don't need to create an account in order to have access to those images), those 'rules' created by shutterstock are not technically enforceable under that license agreement.

Anyways, some people are going to believe what they want to believe, no matter what is presented to them. If someone wants to waste their energy getting all worked up on this, I guess that is their choice. I guess you can't see that, and can't see the bigger picture, so I am not going to discuss this any more. Go ahead and chase after people using preview images if you want.

I'm trying to say though - unless the site to the end user explicitly states "preview images may not be used on websites" (which I have not seen from the license agreements I've reviewed), there's not really any enforceability.

Here's what I found after 3 seconds spent searching, it's for Shutterstock footage:

"A FOOTAGE COMP LICENSE grants you the right to use watermarked, low resolution Footage as a comp (the "Comp Footage") solely in test, sample, comp, or rough cut evaluation materials. Footage Comp Licenses do not permit you to display or distribute to the public or incorporated into any final materials any such Footage. Comp Footage can be edited, but you may not remove or alter the Shutterstock watermark."

I mean, OF COURSE previews are not allowed in final materials. It's just so obvious I can't even believe you question it.
« Last Edit: April 03, 2018, 09:33 by SuperPhoto »

« Reply #30 on: April 03, 2018, 09:30 »
+2
Lol yeah... Okay. And your point?

It doesn't explicitly say the materials "cannot be used on websites". And for the site in question - they could simply argue it is preview/evaluation site.

I hope you are joking.  ;)

A website that is live is of course a "finished product", even if it gets changed later.

A "preview/evaluation" is not something the public has access to.

Read again - "do not permit you to display or distribute to the public".

Shelma1

« Reply #31 on: April 03, 2018, 10:11 »
+4
I'm trying to say though - unless the site to the end user explicitly states "preview images may not be used on websites" (which I have not seen from the license agreements I've reviewed), there's not really any enforceability. And even if that was written - it doesn't necessarily mean that it is enforceable, simply because there is the understanding that a preview is an 'evaluation' (incentive to get someone to purchase the full version). As for DMCA notices, it is supposed to apply to full copyrighted content.

It's like say having a bag of cookies for sale in costco, and getting mad at costco because they are giving out free samples to 'non-paying' customers. Sure, some will never have an intention of buying that brand of cookies whatsoever. But others, they think, mm these are good cookies, and then buy them, maybe even buy a few and tell some friends.

I guess to each his own. If you want to get upset because someone is using watermarked content on their site, then go ahead and get upset and chase after every single person doing that. I feel time would be better spent creating new content and looking for paying customers, but - it's your choice.

Now that you've given your permission to use your watermarked images, tell us who you are so we can use them.

niktol

« Reply #32 on: April 03, 2018, 10:55 »
0
Of course watermarked images are just as subject to copyright as non-watermarked. Or else I'll just claim that anything with an ocean, or a river view or any drop of water is "watermarked" and take it. Or simply say that the left half of the image is a watermark, while the right half I use freely while agreeing with the inconvenience to display the left half as well.

Of course for practical reasons some limited free use of watermarked images may be allowed by some agencies. Following these instructions closely does not constitute theft just like trying on a pair of pants inside a store does not equate to taking them without permission and wearing them outside.

Of course for the same practical reasons chasing every shoplifter in a big city regardless of whether he removes security magnetic tags or "agrees to leave them on" is next to impossible.

Of course people are easily trolled online, hence a new profession was born.

spacedrone808

  • spacedrone808


« Reply #33 on: April 04, 2018, 05:42 »
+1
Pretty sure that about 60% images on the web are stolen.

SpaceStockFootage

  • Space, Sci-Fi and Astronomy Related Stock Footage

« Reply #34 on: April 04, 2018, 07:03 »
+1
Lol yeah... Okay. And your point?

The point is that, contrary to your opinions on that matter, it's not ok to use watermarked images. That was the whole point of the thread past the original post, so it's a very valid point!

Yes, tracking down and dealing with such things might be more trouble than it's worth, I'll give you that... but pretty much everyone knew that already. The point of this thread was a general FYI that a site was using watermarked images. It wasn't an FYI that a site was using watermarked images and we should all plough all of our time, energy and resources into getting them to remove those images.   

« Reply #35 on: April 04, 2018, 08:43 »
+1
SuperPhoto, I'm going to give you the benefit of a very small doubt, and suppose you are thinking the images are hotlinked.

There is one instance where I don't mind if someone uses my images without buying them, and that is hotlinking to the thumbnail in a forum.  If they are not using it to make money, but just trying to illustrate their comment, that use is a sort of advertising.  The hotlink will give someone a way to find the site I am selling the image on, if they want to buy it.

Otherwise, thieves can die in a fire.

Uncle Pete

  • Great Place by a Great Lake - My Home Port
« Reply #36 on: April 04, 2018, 13:55 »
+1
SuperPhoto, I'm going to give you the benefit of a very small doubt, and suppose you are thinking the images are hotlinked.

There is one instance where I don't mind if someone uses my images without buying them, and that is hotlinking to the thumbnail in a forum.  If they are not using it to make money, but just trying to illustrate their comment, that use is a sort of advertising.  The hotlink will give someone a way to find the site I am selling the image on, if they want to buy it.

Otherwise, thieves can die in a fire.


Hotlinking images from another site, is stealing bandwidth and just as bad as stealing images. http://www.webweaver.nu/html-tips/hotlinking.shtml

Yes if someone posts here and uses a hotlink, that's different, it's just a forum illustration. Probably not legit, but also not being used for commercial or other website purposes. There was (and still is) a site that searched for our work and posed them as "free backgrounds", better yet, while they were giving away your work and mine, they also used hotlinks to my web pages to do the theft. They didn't even host the images they stole.

If you read the article you'll see how to deal with this, in the case where they had hotlinked from my personal web pages. I edited the page, used a renamed file for my site and then added a copy of the original that said, in big red letters, "this image is stolen and is not free".  ;D I haven't checked but for years that's what showed on his free background site for the images he stole by hotlinking from my web pages.

I pay for the hosting and the bandwidth has limits. I don't like it when someone steals my paid bandwidth for their cheap site or for a blog. I don't believe you should either.

« Reply #37 on: April 04, 2018, 15:26 »
+1
It's like say having a bag of cookies for sale in costco, and getting mad at costco because they are giving out free samples to 'non-paying' customers. Sure, some will never have an intention of buying that brand of cookies whatsoever. But others, they think, mm these are good cookies, and then buy them, maybe even buy a few and tell some friends.

More often than not that's a vendor of the product. But, since Microstock is Costco ... snag me up half a pallet of marijuana pictures.

« Reply #38 on: April 05, 2018, 11:18 »
0
If you had a watermark in my images on your site, I would be perfectly fine with that.

lol, don't worry about it.

a) It's probably a placeholder. ANY professional (real) site would not get business if they had 'shutterstock' all watermarked over it.
b) If they ARE a real site trying to get busienss, they probably don't have the money anyways to pay for it - and it is advertising for you.
c) Also - asfaik, they aren't "stolen" either. Pretty much every stock site lets you download preview/watermarked images/video/etc.



a) don't know if it's a placeholder, doesn't matter, illegal use
b) No it's not advertising, it's stealing
c) Wrong, downloading a sample and using it are far different.

Can I have some of your best images to use on my website? I promise to mention your name if I ever make some money. Sorry can't afford to pay but you'll get exposure, views, and maybe credit.  ;D

Well you are a typical idiot Trump voter. Give me your wallet while you're at it.

« Reply #39 on: April 05, 2018, 11:19 »
0
I'm trying to say though - unless the site to the end user explicitly states "preview images may not be used on websites" (which I have not seen from the license agreements I've reviewed), there's not really any enforceability. And even if that was written - it doesn't necessarily mean that it is enforceable, simply because there is the understanding that a preview is an 'evaluation' (incentive to get someone to purchase the full version). As for DMCA notices, it is supposed to apply to full copyrighted content.

It's like say having a bag of cookies for sale in costco, and getting mad at costco because they are giving out free samples to 'non-paying' customers. Sure, some will never have an intention of buying that brand of cookies whatsoever. But others, they think, mm these are good cookies, and then buy them, maybe even buy a few and tell some friends.

I guess to each his own. If you want to get upset because someone is using watermarked content on their site, then go ahead and get upset and chase after every single person doing that. I feel time would be better spent creating new content and looking for paying customers, but - it's your choice.

Now that you've given your permission to use your watermarked images, tell us who you are so we can use them.

This!

« Reply #40 on: April 05, 2018, 16:21 »
+1

I pay for the hosting and the bandwidth has limits. I don't like it when someone steals my paid bandwidth for their cheap site or for a blog. I don't believe you should either.

Oh, but it's so much fun to switch pictures on them when they do that.

There are "free coloring pages" sites that regularly hotlink to the thumbnails on unseengallery.com.  When they do, I redirect my page to a duplicate, and replace the image they're linking to with lemonparty or tubgirl. 

« Reply #41 on: April 05, 2018, 17:05 »
0

I pay for the hosting and the bandwidth has limits. I don't like it when someone steals my paid bandwidth for their cheap site or for a blog. I don't believe you should either.

Oh, but it's so much fun to switch pictures on them when they do that.

There are "free coloring pages" sites that regularly hotlink to the thumbnails on unseengallery.com.  When they do, I redirect my page to a duplicate, and replace the image they're linking to with lemonparty or tubgirl.

LOL Bahahah. That's the best idea I've ever heard.

« Reply #42 on: April 05, 2018, 19:22 »
0
I'm scared to google those to find out what they are.

Shelma1

« Reply #43 on: April 05, 2018, 20:52 »
0
I'm scared to google those to find out what they are.

I made that mistake. I didn't see the images, but the descriptions were bad enough.

Uncle Pete

  • Great Place by a Great Lake - My Home Port
« Reply #44 on: April 06, 2018, 09:23 »
0

I pay for the hosting and the bandwidth has limits. I don't like it when someone steals my paid bandwidth for their cheap site or for a blog. I don't believe you should either.

Oh, but it's so much fun to switch pictures on them when they do that.

There are "free coloring pages" sites that regularly hotlink to the thumbnails on unseengallery.com.  When they do, I redirect my page to a duplicate, and replace the image they're linking to with lemonparty or tubgirl.

Way to go, keeps them on their toes. Not that I know what lemonparty or tubgirl is.  ;D Oh I'm sorry I did the search, but happy not to see the actual tubgirl...


« Reply #45 on: April 07, 2018, 07:29 »
+1
Cease and desist or PAY for your work.  Would you not pay them for their work? Would they work for you without their pay?


 

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