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Author Topic: Dubious Email From Deposit Photo...  (Read 2877 times)

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« on: November 16, 2017, 10:52 »
0
Hi. Long time lurker, first time writing!

I've just recieved an email from a woman supposedly from Deposit Photo wanting one of my photos. Has anyone else been approached this way? Email goes like this

my name is Olesya.
I know you've been delivering your images to Depositphotos and than decided to cooperate with Istock platform exclusively.
Hope its going great!
Our big European client has interest in your image, and as far as we have an agreement, the image can be purchased via our platform only.
They are interested in  RM, non-exclusive purchase for 2-3 years, for 1800-2000. We can offer you 35% from the deal.
Please give me a feedback if you can upload this image asap.


The email comes from an @depositphotos.com so I'm assuming it's legit. They sent another email not long after with a link to the photo they wanted.

Is it worth it? The image isn't exclusive to iStock and is on another site. It's made a few small sales, but hasn't attracted that much interest.

Has anyone else been approached this way? And what was the outcome? I've emailed her back just to see what they are really offering.

Thanks for any advice.


« Reply #1 on: November 16, 2017, 13:12 »
+1
I say go for it.

niktol

« Reply #2 on: November 16, 2017, 13:56 »
+2
sounds like a good deal. However, I was never contacted by an agency on behalf of a client, it does not look like common practice. Make sure you're not dealing with email spoofing where the message appears to have originated from someone else. Contact the DP independently see if they know about this.

« Reply #3 on: November 16, 2017, 13:58 »
+1
Answer them that for 43% they can have the image

« Reply #4 on: November 16, 2017, 17:18 »
+1
I emailed them back to get an email saying...
thank you for your respond.
Unfortunately we can't guarantee the purchase.
Sincerely,
Olesya

And since then have sold it for 74p twice on Adobe Stock.

Im being hopeful it doesnt turn up on their site under someone elses name...

Shelma1

« Reply #5 on: November 16, 2017, 17:31 »
+6
I'm always suspicious of emails that have poor spelling and grammar. And offers that seem too good to be true. Would it have cost less for someone to license the image through DP than Adobe?

« Reply #6 on: November 17, 2017, 07:25 »
+1
Aren't they just asking that you upload it to DP though?

« Reply #7 on: November 17, 2017, 08:37 »
+4
It's a trap!

Who is the "big European client"?  You would need that information to make a decision, and they aren't providing it.

Probably the aim is to get your payment information as part of the deal.  I bet they say they want to deposit your money directly into your bank, rather than go through Paypal or another party.

 

« Reply #8 on: November 17, 2017, 08:52 »
+2
Why don't you contact Depositphotos directly here:
https://depositphotos.com/contact_us.html

Semmick Photo

« Reply #9 on: November 17, 2017, 09:09 »
+1
I'm always suspicious of emails that have poor spelling and grammar. And offers that seem too good to be true. Would it have cost less for someone to license the image through DP than Adobe?

The name who sent the email sounds Eastern European / Russian, and DP is a Russian owned site. I wouldnt be surprised that they do not write in perfect English.

Even more, nothing bad can happen from uploading a photo to DP. The worst thing that can happen is that the deal falls through and he doesnt sell the image.

Its not like they are asking him for his bank account etc.

DP are eager to get this deal done, because they will make 1200 euro/dollar, hence they contact the photographer.

Semmick Photo

« Reply #10 on: November 17, 2017, 09:10 »
0
It's a trap!

Who is the "big European client"?  You would need that information to make a decision, and they aren't providing it.

Probably the aim is to get your payment information as part of the deal.  I bet they say they want to deposit your money directly into your bank, rather than go through Paypal or another party.
I assume they add the earnings to his account and he gets paid as he normally would get paid

Shelma1

« Reply #11 on: November 17, 2017, 09:19 »
+2
I'm always suspicious of emails that have poor spelling and grammar. And offers that seem too good to be true. Would it have cost less for someone to license the image through DP than Adobe?

The name who sent the email sounds Eastern European / Russian, and DP is a Russian owned site. I wouldnt be surprised that they do not write in perfect English.

Even more, nothing bad can happen from uploading a photo to DP. The worst thing that can happen is that the deal falls through and he doesnt sell the image.

Its not like they are asking him for his bank account etc.

DP are eager to get this deal done, because they will make 1200 euro/dollar, hence they contact the photographer.

The email is very odd. The writer claims to "know" the OP went exclusive with iS (he did not), and if that's true they're asking him to break the terms of exclusivity by uploading a photo to DP.

They may not be asking for his bank account info upfront, but who's to know what they'd ask for if communication continued?

The whole thing sounds strange. I'd check with DP first if I were him. If it's legit he has nothing to lose.

« Reply #12 on: November 17, 2017, 10:09 »
+2
Why don't you contact Depositphotos directly here:
https://depositphotos.com/contact_us.html

This is the obvious first step. Confirm with DP if the contact is legitimate.

Noedelhap

  • www.colincramm.com

« Reply #13 on: November 17, 2017, 10:32 »
0
it's an odd email, since they're assuming you're exclusive with iStock.

Also, 35% isn't a very good percentage, but if you can still sell the image non-exclusively, go ahead.

« Reply #14 on: November 17, 2017, 10:34 »
+3
.. The writer claims to "know" the OP went exclusive with iS (he did not), and if that's true they're asking him to break the terms of exclusivity by uploading a photo to DP..

The proposal was for an RM sale which would not violate the exclusivity agreement - one becomes RF exclusive with iStock, and RM sales have always been OK.

I would be very circumspect about doing any business with DepositPhotos, but if you're already with them, doing a deal on the side for an RM license is only a matter of whether you're OK with them taking such a huge chunk of the high value sale.

Shelma1

« Reply #15 on: November 17, 2017, 10:41 »
0
Ah. Ok, thanks for the explanation.

Semmick Photo

« Reply #16 on: November 17, 2017, 13:48 »
0
I agree that checking with DP directly is the first and most logical step


« Reply #17 on: November 18, 2017, 11:01 »
+1
Why don't you contact Depositphotos directly here:
https://depositphotos.com/contact_us.html

This is the obvious first step. Confirm with DP if the contact is legitimate.

Of course it is obvious.
I don't understand why people open threads when they could ask directly to those in the best position to answer

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