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Author Topic: remove a dust spot on video  (Read 5503 times)

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« on: March 11, 2015, 07:54 »
0
Hi All,

I wonder is there an easy way to remove a dust spot on a video? i took the video on tripod, and a dust spot on blue sky.

I am using adobe premiere, I think I can put a tiff or jpg layer on the video and render it.

I try to look for a tutorial but can't find how to do it.

anyone can give some instructions? thank you.

I previous export mov to tiff and edit in lightroom and put back as video, but it takes time and waste hard drive space.

thanks in advance.


« Reply #1 on: March 11, 2015, 08:21 »
+4
I know a very easy way to remove dust and dirt from u're video, but only in after effects.
1.Import u're video in ae , drag u're video in a new comp.
2.Duplicate u're video
3.Use the mask tool and select the area u want to clean.
4.Go to Mask ----> Options ----> Feather (and choose a value of 9)
5.Search in the efects field for "dust & scratches" effect -----> drag on u're video
6. Make the "radius" 15 or 20
7.That's it...good luck

« Reply #2 on: March 11, 2015, 09:28 »
0
Easy to do in photoshop if nothing moves over the blue sky. Create a transparent layer, go to video layer and take a matching sample from a clean part of the sky. Make sure you have a decent feathered edge on your brush. Clone over the spot. Render video then pull back into premier and do your normal magic there.

ogm

« Reply #3 on: March 12, 2015, 03:33 »
0
Try this : http://www.iceflowstudios.com/2013/tutorials/photoshops-content-aware-videos/

It works, but you will need enough power and time to render! Although the huge file, in some cases I think it's worth!

« Reply #4 on: March 12, 2015, 14:26 »
0
For me, the best solution sometimes is to clean the sensor and reshoot... but obviously this isn't always so simple.  I'll have to check out those methods posted above, great stuff!

« Reply #5 on: March 12, 2015, 16:02 »
0
Hi All,

I wonder is there an easy way to remove a dust spot on a video? i took the video on tripod, and a dust spot on blue sky.

I am using adobe premiere, I think I can put a tiff or jpg layer on the video and render it.

I try to look for a tutorial but can't find how to do it.

anyone can give some instructions? thank you.

I previous export mov to tiff and edit in lightroom and put back as video, but it takes time and waste hard drive space.

thanks in advance.


Russel Brown's method using Photoshop CS5 Extended (actually applies to CS4 Extended too) should work fine on dust spots in a blue sky, even if the colour varies somewhat from frame to frame.

Watch the tutorial here http://tv.adobe.com/watch/russell-brown-at-photoshop-world-2011-orlando/smart-object-video-in-photoshop/

Similar technique can also be used in After Effects.

« Reply #6 on: June 15, 2016, 16:24 »
0
i think this links help you
newbielink:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wv208nqwnSw [nonactive]
newbielink:https://youtu.be/oQOoY6ScDvc [nonactive]

« Reply #7 on: June 16, 2016, 04:37 »
0
Probably the easiest way in PP is export a tiff, clean tiff in PS import it into PP, add it as layer above the clip and use a mask/matte.

Benozaur

« Reply #8 on: June 16, 2016, 06:03 »
0
I use Nuke for compositing and After Effects for quick comps and effects work - both should do the job easily. If you have Premiere then you probably have access to After Effects on Adobe's Creative Cloud package - Nuke would be overkill in this case.

I'll describe a quick fix for an After Effects workflow which I think you could easily adapt to Premiere if you wish, no effects or plugins needed.
- Duplicate your footage clip on your timeline and draw a small circular mask using the pen tool next to your dust spot (about 30 - 50 pixeld to the right or left) and feather it about 12 pixels or so.
- If you solo your masked clip you should just have a blue spot where your mask is.
- Next, just move the masked clip over your original and the dust spot is overlayed by your masked clip (the dust spot should be directly underneath your masked clip which has sampled a different piece of sky).
- No need to render a still frame as a tiff because this way you will keep your grain and any subtle changes in color over time.

What you would have done is to create a patch adjacent to your dust spot and shifted that patch over the offending area.

Another method would be to use the clone tool to clone a piece of sky next to your dust spot by sampling a clean piece of sky next to it but I don't think Premiere has that.

Remember to choose a clean piece of sky that lies on a horizontal axis (left/right) as opposed to a piece of sky either above or below your dust spot because sky is generally lighter lower on the horizon line and gets darker as you move up.

Hope this helps...

« Reply #9 on: June 16, 2016, 11:08 »
0
Benozaur - my method works pretty well but your method has a number of important advantages over mine - thanks for detailing the method.

« Reply #10 on: June 18, 2016, 08:05 »
0
I use Nuke for compositing and After Effects for quick comps and effects work - both should do the job easily. If you have Premiere then you probably have access to After Effects on Adobe's Creative Cloud package - Nuke would be overkill in this case.

I'll describe a quick fix for an After Effects workflow which I think you could easily adapt to Premiere if you wish, no effects or plugins needed.
- Duplicate your footage clip on your timeline and draw a small circular mask using the pen tool next to your dust spot (about 30 - 50 pixeld to the right or left) and feather it about 12 pixels or so.
- If you solo your masked clip you should just have a blue spot where your mask is.
- Next, just move the masked clip over your original and the dust spot is overlayed by your masked clip (the dust spot should be directly underneath your masked clip which has sampled a different piece of sky).
- No need to render a still frame as a tiff because this way you will keep your grain and any subtle changes in color over time.

What you would have done is to create a patch adjacent to your dust spot and shifted that patch over the offending area.

Another method would be to use the clone tool to clone a piece of sky next to your dust spot by sampling a clean piece of sky next to it but I don't think Premiere has that.

Remember to choose a clean piece of sky that lies on a horizontal axis (left/right) as opposed to a piece of sky either above or below your dust spot because sky is generally lighter lower on the horizon line and gets darker as you move up.

Hope this helps...

This is how I do it almost every time. You can move the clip around until get a nice blend over the spot. If I happen to be in Photoshop with my clip I create a new layer and simply clone over the sensor spot as in a photo and make sure that layer is times to the whole clip. Skies are usually easy unless there is moving clouds and blue sky mixes, especially on time lapses.  In FCPX I've taken a couple of masks and pulled them into Apple Motion and inverted them, reserving as an inverted mask so I can have the flexibility I might need.  Either way, Benozaur's method is my most commonly used spot correction tool.

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