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Author Topic: New to illustrations  (Read 13089 times)

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« Reply #25 on: March 09, 2009, 20:18 »
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The format that Istock requires for all Vectors to be supplied in is deliberately basic (Illustrator 8 eps compatible) to make sure that buyers can open and use the files so you should be able to use something other than Illustrator to create them with.

If you are serious though you need to learn Illustrator.


bittersweet

« Reply #26 on: March 10, 2009, 05:26 »
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Here is a great article that touches on some of the issues with various software programs, as well as explains why the eps 8 compatibility is so important:

http://www.istockphoto.com/article_view.php?ID=156


« Reply #27 on: May 31, 2009, 01:26 »
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Hi all I am interested in learning illustrations and vector art.
Any advice on how to get started?

Spend 4 years at art school.
Unless you are exceptionally talented you will get nowhere otherwise (see all the 2nd rate vector artists clogging up all the sites and getting next to no sales)


  ??? Nonsense, how do you know what stock clients may or may not want?

I have created work to imitate pre-schooler's drawings that have sold very well.

When my children where young they created some artwork and I posted them on Zazzle for them.  4 years latter they still sell on t-shirts and stamps.

Just because a style dose not meet your standards dose not make useless. Vlad  :-[

I've been producing artwork as a paid freelancer for 34 years and never been in an "art school".
« Last Edit: May 31, 2009, 01:45 by Dennis Holmes »

MisterElements

« Reply #28 on: June 13, 2009, 16:25 »
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Hi all I am interested in learning illustrations and vector art.
Any advice on how to get started?

Spend 4 years at art school.
Unless you are exceptionally talented you will get nowhere otherwise (see all the 2nd rate vector artists clogging up all the sites and getting next to no sales)


  ??? Nonsense, how do you know what stock clients may or may not want?

I have created work to imitate pre-schooler's drawings that have sold very well.

When my children where young they created some artwork and I posted them on Zazzle for them.  4 years latter they still sell on t-shirts and stamps.

Just because a style dose not meet your standards dose not make useless. Vlad  :-[

I've been producing artwork as a paid freelancer for 34 years and never been in an "art school".


 I have to agree with Mr D! however I did have 4 years at SVA in NYC and I can say it did very little for my more simple styles. I made a tattoo dragon set that took 15mins to ink, scan and format and its made over $2000+ in 18 months with 100,000+ views on istock and xpert each and my top seller on SS. so sometimes the standard rules of quality and time don,t apply to sales. I have found a balance between time/quality to make a consistent money amount and a very good living. Plus flooding the market with too much work at once can turn your style into a fad not a living everything in business is about a good balance.  
« Last Edit: June 13, 2009, 17:00 by MisterElements »

« Reply #29 on: September 05, 2009, 16:14 »
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Hi all I am interested in learning illustrations and vector art.
Any advice on how to get started?

Spend 4 years at art school.
Unless you are exceptionally talented you will get nowhere otherwise (see all the 2nd rate vector artists clogging up all the sites and getting next to no sales)

Late to this thread. But I don't understand where this response comes from. In the UK there are thousands of designers who went through Art School for four years and have never found employment (I happen to sit about fifty feet away from one and all he does is chase invoice payment) - so this does not entirely equate.  Also, some of the top designers in the UK have no formal "art" education yet somehow manage to make a serious wedge of money. If someone has ambition and focus, I say go for it.


Yes there is a lot of crap - yet crap sells surprisingly well....and art school graduates are buying it.

« Reply #30 on: September 05, 2009, 17:17 »
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i also think that my initial thread was misunderstood. I did not mean to get the latest software etc. I do firmly believe however in learning the system that would be accepted from the outset, after all what's the point of knowing how to draw if you can't use illustrator if thats the accepted standard of software?? or even becoming familiar with another software to start with if the output from it will not be accepted, might as well persist from the beginning with the correct thing even it it may seem daunting.

I strongly disagree with this. Vector illustration is more a state of mind, particularly if you use the pen tool a lot. You have to think differently about how to create an image. Learn it in one program (even in Photoshop) and transferring to another vector program should be like driving a different make of car. Sure, it takes a while to become really productive (all the tools, hotkeys etc) but don't get too hung up on any particular software.

vlad_the_imp

« Reply #31 on: September 07, 2009, 00:36 »
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I've been producing artwork as a paid freelancer for 34 years and never been in an "art school".

Yes, there are a few people who are untrained and manage to sell work, even enough to make a living. It's rare though.Going to art school not only improves your drawing skills but teaches you how to understand design and visual communication. Learning how to use Illustrator does not make you an illustrator. The proof is there to see on any 'latest vector uploads' section of any stock site. There is huge amounts of crap on istock and other sites, most of it produced by the untrained. The top sellers , illustration-wise, on istock, are all art school graduates. I would remove all the crap and the work from photographers who think they'll have a go at vectors because they pay better, the site would be a vast improvement.

« Reply #32 on: September 07, 2009, 03:05 »
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I've been producing artwork as a paid freelancer for 34 years and never been in an "art school".

Yes, there are a few people who are untrained and manage to sell work, even enough to make a living. It's rare though.Going to art school not only improves your drawing skills but teaches you how to understand design and visual communication. Learning how to use Illustrator does not make you an illustrator. The proof is there to see on any 'latest vector uploads' section of any stock site. There is huge amounts of crap on istock and other sites, most of it produced by the untrained. The top sellers , illustration-wise, on istock, are all art school graduates. I would remove all the crap and the work from photographers who think they'll have a go at vectors because they pay better, the site would be a vast improvement.
I'm sure all the pro photographers would like to get rid of the amateurs in that field too.

« Reply #33 on: September 07, 2009, 06:09 »
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I've been producing artwork as a paid freelancer for 34 years and never been in an "art school".

The top sellers , illustration-wise, on istock, are all art school graduates.

That's a false statement, trust me :D

I haven't gone to a traditional art school but I am doing quite well on daily earnings. Of course not too high yet on all time earnings and downloads, as I started a year and a half ago. Btw, my career outside stock was going very well too.

All this aside, I believe in education a lot! I have to add that I got a training in graphic design and animation, but definitely never studied traditional arts and illustration.

I will kind of agree with you as I am pretty good at self learning. I read many books on art and illustration. Yes I haven't been to a traditional art school but what they teach at an art school is accessible outside the art school as well If you want to find it.

It depends on the person. That's why you can not generalize. I am sure I know more on illustration then many art school graduates as I did read lots of text they teach there. Some people just can't get it even if they are going to an art school. And some people will find the books and resources no matter if they go to an art school or not.

« Reply #34 on: September 07, 2009, 06:24 »
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after all what's the point of knowing how to draw if you can't use illustrator if thats the accepted standard of software??

Good luck with that!

Everybody has a chance if they accept the challenge and work hard to overcome the obstacles it represents. But there is definitely no chance if you don't believe you will need to improve your drawing skills as well as learning the software.

After this statement, I think your chance on becoming a good vector artist is less than the possibility of you winning the lottery.

« Reply #35 on: September 07, 2009, 07:26 »
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after all what's the point of knowing how to draw if you can't use illustrator if thats the accepted standard of software??

Good luck with that!

Everybody has a chance if they accept the challenge and work hard to overcome the obstacles it represents. But there is definitely no chance if you don't believe you will need to improve your drawing skills as well as learning the software.

After this statement, I think your chance on becoming a good vector artist is less than the possibility of you winning the lottery.
I think you're being a bit harsh here. Many traditional artists have a hard time learning to create art with digital media. Artists tend to be a bit inimical towards technology. I've been looking at a lot of books on drawing myself lately and they nearly all use traditional media. The very few that mention computers mention Photoshop. I've yet to see a book on drawing that teaches how to draw with a vector program. The many books on how to use Illustrator don't teach drawing skills, only how to use the tools.

« Reply #36 on: September 07, 2009, 07:35 »
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The many books on how to use Illustrator don't teach drawing skills, only how to use the tools.

They will never teach drawing skills. Drawing skills MUST be learned traditionally. Once you learn them then you will need some time to get used to illustrator tools.

You can watch videos on how to use illustrator on adobe.com, on youtube, on lynda.com or on vtc.com

They will all teach you how to use the software. You can be sure that they will never teach you drawing skills. Because illustrator is not a magical tool that will turn dummies into picasso. Illustrator is only there to help you utilize already existing drawing skills. Don't expect any tutorials on that.

I was definitely not harsh. If he/she would like to draw vectors, then he/she will have to improve traditional drawing skills. Better tell people the truth than make them happy with a false statement.
« Last Edit: September 07, 2009, 07:38 by cidepix »

vlad_the_imp

« Reply #37 on: September 07, 2009, 08:19 »
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That's a false statement, trust me

Well I know most of the top 20 vector artists (are you in that group, I think possibly not) and the vast majority are artschool trained.

« Reply #38 on: September 07, 2009, 08:34 »
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That's a false statement, trust me

Well I know most of the top 20 vector artists (are you in that group, I think possibly not) and the vast majority are artschool trained.

Well I am not. Entering microstock 4-5 years late doesn't help either.

But outside microstock I don't think that top 20 is much ahead of me. Anyway, my point is education is very important. Limiting it to art school is ridiculous. Some people can be very well educated without an art school. As I said I studied animation and Graphic design AT SCHOOL, and illustration from books and all sorts of resources.

So I still studied art and illustration but not at school. You saying "4 year spent at art school" being a must, is really not working for everyone.

Not only the books but I had the chance to be trained in person by a very famous cartoonist and learn many technical aspects of illustration from him.

It is really ridiculous to think that you can't be successful without art school. There are many ways people can learn art.

vlad_the_imp

« Reply #39 on: September 07, 2009, 09:55 »
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You saying "4 year spent at art school" being a must,

Nowhere have I said it's a must. However, having been in the business quite possibly more years than you've been alive, I've met a lot of people and the majority, the vast majority, are art school graduates. It is possible to teach yourself but it's not just about learning how to use illustrator, it's also about looking and seeing and absorbing the collective knowledge of your tutors and lecturers and fellow students. It's about opening up to a whole wide world of artistic influences, not just illustration but fine art and studying whole areas connected to and influencing and influenced by art. I never said you can't be successful without art school, it's just a lot harder.

« Reply #40 on: September 07, 2009, 11:25 »
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You saying "4 year spent at art school" being a must,

Nowhere have I said it's a must. However, having been in the business quite possibly more years than you've been alive, I've met a lot of people and the majority, the vast majority, are art school graduates. It is possible to teach yourself but it's not just about learning how to use illustrator, it's also about looking and seeing and absorbing the collective knowledge of your tutors and lecturers and fellow students. It's about opening up to a whole wide world of artistic influences, not just illustration but fine art and studying whole areas connected to and influencing and influenced by art. I never said you can't be successful without art school, it's just a lot harder.

I agree that you have to work much harder if you have not gone to art school. You said all top sellers are art school graduates. I don't agree with that. If you are limiting the top sellers to 20 people only than you may be right, but I think even top 100 consists of good sellers and not all of them are art graduates.

As I said there are many ways to study. Especially nowadays. It is astonishing the material you can find on the internet. All the knowledge of tutors you are talking about are there. Just google it!

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