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Author Topic: Landscape and categories question  (Read 1391 times)

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« on: February 11, 2019, 07:49 »
0
Hi:

Newbie question:

Which categories do you select in the agencies when you have more than one and you upload a landscape?

I use use to shot a lot of landscapes like beaches or mountains and I use to set "travel" and "backgrounds" or "nature" and "backgrounds" or "landscape" and "backgrounds".

I mean, if I have just one I select "travel", "landscape" or "nature" (like in AS) but if I have two I use to set one as "background".

In these pictures I don't use to shot persons or buildings. I understand that may be used as "backgrounds" but because of my short english I'm not sure. Maybe I'm wrong.

How do you set this kind of pictures?

Thank you very much  ;)


« Reply #1 on: February 11, 2019, 08:50 »
+1
Landscapes are not backgrounds

Travel, nature and landscapes are the only ones that fit

« Reply #2 on: February 11, 2019, 10:28 »
0
Ok, thank you for your answer.

I have a lot of pictures wrong in second category then. Have to think if change them one by one.

« Reply #3 on: February 11, 2019, 10:49 »
+2
Look:

Fondos y texturas: contenido que tiene la apariencia de un fondo de pantalla o fondo de pantalla de computadora o una fotografa o ilustracin que se cre como fondo. Por ejemplo: paisajes, detalles arquitectnicos, texturas, patrones, fotos planas, etc.

-----------
Backgrounds and textures: content that has the appearance of a computer wallpaper or wallpaper or a photograph or illustration that was created as a background. For example: landscapes, architectural details, textures, patterns, flat photos, etc.

---

From Shutterstock FAQ.




« Reply #4 on: February 11, 2019, 11:59 »
+1
Look:

Fondos y texturas: contenido que tiene la apariencia de un fondo de pantalla o fondo de pantalla de computadora o una fotografa o ilustracin que se cre como fondo. Por ejemplo: paisajes, detalles arquitectnicos, texturas, patrones, fotos planas, etc.

-----------
Backgrounds and textures: content that has the appearance of a computer wallpaper or wallpaper or a photograph or illustration that was created as a background. For example: landscapes, architectural details, textures, patterns, flat photos, etc.

---

From Shutterstock FAQ.

Fine :) you have your answer

I still wouldn't call a "landscape" a background though

You have to think how a customer would use a category in their search for content.

If you put it in the wrong category then will a customer find it?

If they can't you'll lose sales

« Reply #5 on: February 11, 2019, 12:25 »
0
That's the reason why I have made the question. Don't understand yet how the buyers search and which it's the better option (FAQ are not clear for me).

The point is that my English sometimes is not good enough... some words in Spanish doesn't mean exactly the same.

But I understand that the main point it's the buyer's mind and It's really hard to me to think about it all the time.

« Reply #6 on: February 11, 2019, 13:43 »
0
What about places?

« Reply #7 on: February 11, 2019, 14:49 »
0
I use to set "places" as second category in BS when I upload some famous building (architecture/places).

« Reply #8 on: February 12, 2019, 05:01 »
+2
Why not simply "landscape"
Oh, it is missing in Shutterstock Asking it for years now  >:(

Uncle Pete

  • Great Place by a Great Lake - My Home Port
« Reply #9 on: February 13, 2019, 09:44 »
+1
Some landscapes are backgrounds, not all are. I tag accordingly and by my own opinion. If the shot is something that can be used a a background, with copy space and open areas, I might use background. I don't think there's an absolute answer that yes or no, they are or are not.

« Reply #10 on: February 13, 2019, 14:08 »
0
Thank you for all your answers  ;)

« Reply #11 on: February 13, 2019, 14:09 »
0
Some landscapes are backgrounds, not all are. I tag accordingly and by my own opinion. If the shot is something that can be used a a background, with copy space and open areas, I might use background. I don't think there's an absolute answer that yes or no, they are or are not.

"copy space"?

Uncle Pete

  • Great Place by a Great Lake - My Home Port
« Reply #12 on: February 13, 2019, 15:26 »
0
Some landscapes are backgrounds, not all are. I tag accordingly and by my own opinion. If the shot is something that can be used a a background, with copy space and open areas, I might use background. I don't think there's an absolute answer that yes or no, they are or are not.

"copy space"?

Yup I put it in, if there really is copy space, even thought the general consensus is, it doesn't matter or change anything. Not that much trouble to like two words, just in case?  :)

If you want, put in all three "copy Space" Copy-Space" and "Copyspace" No one says don't do it, just that there may be no advantage. I add landscape if it's what I think is a landscape and background if I think it could be used as a background.

With all of those, you get to choose and there are no hard and fast absolutes. Don't expect to find solid answers to questions which are individual or opinions.

Here's one more for your list... my photos usually have 30 or less keywords, (not intentional I just noticed that) because that's enough to cover everything in the image, without spamming, stretching or adding irrelevant words, just to have more words. Some people complain because they are limited to 50.  ;D

All of the above are up to you and you decide if they help or do nothing, or we just don't know.

« Reply #13 on: February 14, 2019, 02:13 »
0
What is "copy space"? A picture with space to write or paste something like a text or logo?

Do you use "copy space" as a keyword?

Uncle Pete

  • Great Place by a Great Lake - My Home Port
« Reply #14 on: February 15, 2019, 16:37 »
0
What is "copy space"? A picture with space to write or paste something like a text or logo?

Do you use "copy space" as a keyword?

Oh I thought you were asking because of a previous discussion "should we use copy space, copy-space or copyspace" And the consensus was, it's a waste of time because buyers don't search for any of them. However... I add copy space, just in case.  :)

OK copy space means space for copy or if that's not clear, text can be added in the images, the photo doesn't fill the whole frame with content, which would be distracting. Leaving copy space is a useful way to get uses. It's not the only way, but if you have a photo with open space and cropped so that it encourages a use as a background, not an image in itself, you might have some success.

This is copy space and the shot was planned and composed that way for copy space:



Note still rule of thirds but the space is there for some text to be placed, into it and retain balance.

Back to there's not one right answer to anything, what works for one image is useless for another, and cropping too tight, defeats the uses where someone might want to include some text, off the images, or in the vernacular of publishing Copy Space. Space for a headline, some text, a link, or maybe something else.

Now let me add to the questions. I just was keywording an image and I usually put Isolated on White (for example) but places like Alamy call them Cutous. So do I put both? Plus just isolated is fine except Getty requires for their CV that's it's Isolated on <color>, to get proper search exposure.

Anyone, use both, does it really matter when someone licensing is likely to have at least one eye that can see, it's and isolate image or a cutout?

Do buyers really search for isolated on white or cutout? I don't know the answer.

And before the discussion takes off on another aside, if there's a shadow or pattern background, it's not truly isolated, but if one wants to argue the shadow is part of the image and the subject and the shadow is isolated, then it is.  :o 8) I don't care, anyone can call it what they want, I just decide for myself and isolated means something that can be selected and dropped into something else, without additional editing. That means, pure flat one color background or maybe with a subtle shadow as a part of the cutout bit.

OK cutout or isolated or both? (Or neither?)
« Last Edit: February 15, 2019, 16:42 by Uncle Pete »

« Reply #15 on: February 16, 2019, 02:12 »
0
Thank you for the explanation  ;)

Uncle Pete

  • Great Place by a Great Lake - My Home Port
« Reply #16 on: February 16, 2019, 12:57 »
0
Thank you for the explanation  ;)

Just keep reading here, new and old messages, search for things you might want to know. Most have been covered a number of times. Eventually you'll have your own ideas and opinions. Have a nice ride...  ;D


 

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