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Author Topic: filming in bright sunlight, which camera to buy?  (Read 8005 times)

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« on: December 28, 2016, 00:09 »
0
I film often in bright sunlight. you can see the colors of clothing reflected off of people's faces.

I want to buy a new camera. what should I look for in a camera in order to make sure it does the best job in regards to filming in bright sunlight?

I read that high ISO is important. would it be true to buy the camera with the highest ISO range?

I currently use the SONY FDR AX100.

any advice is appreciated.


SpaceStockFootage

  • Space, Sci-Fi and Astronomy Related Stock Footage

« Reply #1 on: December 28, 2016, 00:54 »
+2
I know very little about photography, but no camera is going to stop the sun reflecting off of people's t-shirts. You could get your subjects to wear those cone things they put on dogs after surgery to stop the reflections though.

A high ISO isn't going to make any difference as far as I'm aware... in bright light you want to be using the lowest ISO, and even then you'll probably have to squeeze your light hole to stop excessive light coming in.

The only thing I can assume would help when shooting in bright sunlight would be a decent lens, that should minimise lens flares and the like. So yeah, there might be certain cameras with fancy settings and gimmicky features that are geared towards shooting in bright sunlight, but decent lenses are probably the way to go over a fancy camera.

One thing you could do is get your subject to face away from the sun so the clothing isn't reflecting on the face. Then just make sure the sun isn;t in the frame and use a powerful flash to make sure they're lit sufficiently due to the shadow their body will cast on the portion of them facing away from the camera.

That could all be nonsense, I'm just guessing... but I think most of it is nearly right!

« Reply #2 on: December 28, 2016, 03:35 »
0
I have learned that low ISO is best for bright sunlight.

what about gain, do I need a low gain level?

SpaceStockFootage

  • Space, Sci-Fi and Astronomy Related Stock Footage

« Reply #3 on: December 28, 2016, 04:24 »
0
Gain and ISO are reasonably similar. I most cases, these are all things that you want when it comes to shooting in dark conditions. SO forget about ISO and gain.

What's wrong with your videos apart from the colour of people's clothes reflecting on their faces? (That's an issue between the sun, the light it emits, the clothes people are wearing and the current status of the weather/atmosphere... all things that your camera isn't equipped to alter.) If people know what specific issues you're having, then they'll be in a better position to advise.

Have you tried using ND filters? They'll block out a chunk of sunlight before it even reaches the lens, so you're not forced to tighten your pipe, and all that jazz. 

« Reply #4 on: December 28, 2016, 04:54 »
+1
A CPL filter should help to eliminate reflected light and give more intensity to colors including skin tones.
« Last Edit: December 28, 2016, 05:55 by qunamax »

« Reply #5 on: December 28, 2016, 05:42 »
+1
You could use a variable neutral density filter to keep a wider aperture and isolate the subject from the background.  I don't think the camera you use should matter much.

« Reply #6 on: December 28, 2016, 05:44 »
+14
I have learned that low ISO is best for bright sunlight.

what about gain, do I need a low gain level?

I would suggest taking a class on the basics of photography and using your existing camera.

Who is "dtiberio" ?

« Reply #7 on: December 28, 2016, 18:01 »
0
Gain and ISO are reasonably similar. I most cases, these are all things that you want when it comes to shooting in dark conditions. SO forget about ISO and gain.

What's wrong with your videos apart from the colour of people's clothes reflecting on their faces? (That's an issue between the sun, the light it emits, the clothes people are wearing and the current status of the weather/atmosphere... all things that your camera isn't equipped to alter.) If people know what specific issues you're having, then they'll be in a better position to advise.

Have you tried using ND filters? They'll block out a chunk of sunlight before it even reaches the lens, so you're not forced to tighten your pipe, and all that jazz.

You'll be wanting to use the lowest iso as possible, and a polarizing filter will help with the reflections. If it's too bright toss on a couple Neutral Density filters and you'd have a good start, then focus on the lens.

High ISO means more grain ... though there was a topic a few years back that a slight increase in ISO gave crisper photos, I wouldn't suggest ruining a set of shots to test that theory. ISO is like ... the inverse to light. The brighter the lighting, the lower ISO. The dimmer, the higher.

Honestly not sure where you heard that high ISO would help with that but, they were wrong. Maybe see if there are some basic photography courses at the local college or at the very least do some online training. A sound knowledge of photography mechanics is handy, even for a hobbyist.

« Reply #8 on: January 01, 2017, 03:32 »
0
first of all, I have tried using polarizing and neutral density filters (I think the brand is Hoya) and they are mostly worthless.

I have gone through hundreds of cameras, and even the garbage cameras have an ISO setting of 100 and do poorly in bright sunlight.

I am looking for a camera that performs well in bright sunlight, because I almost exclusively film in bright sunlight.

the ISO is not an accurate measure. 2 cameras that both have a min ISO of 100 may perform completely differently in bright sunlight.

I would have done testing but my camera is being repaired right now, and has been for a few weeks.

SpaceStockFootage

  • Space, Sci-Fi and Astronomy Related Stock Footage

« Reply #9 on: January 01, 2017, 03:43 »
0
"...do poorly in bright sunlight."

What exactly do you mean by this? What is it that you're not happy with?

« Reply #10 on: January 01, 2017, 04:03 »
0
I have 3 cameras. one (SONY FDR AX100) does somewhat well in bright sunlight but not always. the P900 and my waterproof coolpix do horrible in bright sunlight.

I want to buy a new video camera that does better in bright sunlight than the SONY FDR AX100. bright sunlight = filming at the equator around 11am or 1:30pm.

I am trying to figure out how to determine which camera will perform best in bright sunlight. ISO is not an accurate measure, because many cameras with ISO 100 perform differently in bright sunlight.

SpaceStockFootage

  • Space, Sci-Fi and Astronomy Related Stock Footage

« Reply #11 on: January 01, 2017, 04:08 »
0
But how do you define "working well in bright sunlight" though? If people know exactly what it is that you're not happy with (or what it is you're looking to achieve) then they should be able to advise whether a different camera will help, whether different settings on that camera will help, a different lens, a different filter or whether there's not really much you can do.

I mean... are you getting lots of lens flares, are your images overexposed, blown out, lacking contrast, too much contrast, too dark, too much grain, too much noise, the colours are all wrong etc etc?

Also, what settings do you use... do you shoot on auto or do you use full manual controls? Have you played with the shutter speed, stopping down the lens, playing with white balance etc?

« Reply #12 on: January 01, 2017, 04:35 »
+12
Methinks this discussion has run its course.

Actually, it ran its course after the first post.

Anybody who claims he has "gone through hundreds of cameras" and believes a high ISO will help him shoot in bright sunlight is either a troll or terminally hopeless.

Happy 2017, everybody!

« Reply #13 on: January 01, 2017, 06:34 »
0
You might be better off asking the question in a video specialist forum like this one http://www.eoshd.com/comments/forum/4-eoshd/

substancep

  • Medical, science, nature, and macro photography

« Reply #14 on: January 01, 2017, 07:01 »
0
It might have more to do with the way your subject is lit? You might want to get your subjects to wear less brightly colored clothing, or use light modifiers such as a scrim to cut down on the light.

« Reply #15 on: January 01, 2017, 11:42 »
+2
shooting in bright sunlight is very easy, decrease your fstop or increase your shutterspeed or both, if its still too bright, ask God to dim the sun

« Reply #16 on: January 01, 2017, 14:22 »
0
The answer for filming is only one: ND filters.

« Reply #17 on: January 01, 2017, 15:15 »
0
I think the op is probably struggling with contrast.  ND filters don't help much with that.  It doesn't help that the op hasn't told us what the actual problem is.

« Reply #18 on: January 01, 2017, 16:05 »
+3
I think the op is probably struggling with contrast.  ND filters don't help much with that.  It doesn't help that the op hasn't told us what the actual problem is.

I think you've nailed it.  There's a reason most of us avoid shooting at noon.  However many stops of dynamic range your camera may capture, at midday it's probably not enough.  The highlights are too bright and the shadows are too dark, so you lose detail at one end or the other or likely both.  And even if the camera can capture it, the data format you use may be too limited.

Noon is a good time to take a nap, not so much to shoot stills or video.  Especially in bright, sunny places.

« Reply #19 on: January 01, 2017, 16:28 »
+2
Also, polarizing filters reduce glare (reflection of bright light off of a smooth surface). They will do absolutely nothing to prevent color "bleed" onto people's skin.

« Reply #20 on: January 02, 2017, 03:08 »
+1
I think the op is probably struggling with contrast.  ND filters don't help much with that.  It doesn't help that the op hasn't told us what the actual problem is.

I think you've nailed it.  There's a reason most of us avoid shooting at noon.  However many stops of dynamic range your camera may capture, at midday it's probably not enough.  The highlights are too bright and the shadows are too dark, so you lose detail at one end or the other or likely both.  And even if the camera can capture it, the data format you use may be too limited.

Noon is a good time to take a nap, not so much to shoot stills or video.  Especially in bright, sunny places.

Move to the North of England, the usual problem here is not enough light at any time of day !!!!

« Reply #21 on: January 02, 2017, 08:38 »
0
Let me rephrase my question.

I am shopping to buy a new video camera.

Which camera will give me the best quality video in bright sunlight? What specs can I look for in a camera that can identify which camera will give me the best quality video in bright sunlight?

Thankyou

« Reply #22 on: January 02, 2017, 09:24 »
+2
There will be no quality difference in bright sunlight between cameras as lots of light allows for optimal performance.

Again, try defining the problem you think you're having.

SpaceStockFootage

  • Space, Sci-Fi and Astronomy Related Stock Footage

« Reply #23 on: January 02, 2017, 10:10 »
+1
Let me rephrase my question.

I am shopping to buy a new video camera.

Which camera will give me the best quality video in bright sunlight? What specs can I look for in a camera that can identify which camera will give me the best quality video in bright sunlight?

Thankyou

You've rephrased the question enough, but you've still not provided enough information to explain what it is you're looking for. What you need to do is explain exactly what it is that you're not satisfied with. And please don't say that you're just not satisfied with their performance in bright light. You need to say exactly what it is, specifically, that you're not happy with.

« Reply #24 on: January 02, 2017, 14:39 »
+1
Lets try putting it another way. The problem which you originally said you had is due to the way light is reflected. Bright light will make brighter reflections. Coloured surfaces will give coloured reflections.  There is no easy "in camera" fix for the colour or amount of reflection apart from trying to take your videos at times and locations with more diffuse light.


Very bright sunlight is also difficult due to blown highlights, assuming the rest of the image is correctly exposed. Again, no easy "in camera" fix.


It can all be "fixed" to a greater or lesser extent in post, but while that is relatively easy for stills it is less so, or at least more time consuming, for video.


In other words, as has already been said, different cameras, lenses, and filters, assuming you already have reasonable gear, won't help with your problem.









 

ShadySue

« Reply #25 on: January 02, 2017, 15:59 »
0
Honestly not sure where you heard that high ISO would help with that but, they were wrong.
Possibly from old filmography.
I know that for the film Out of Africa they had great difficulty matching footage taken in contrasty light with other footage, until they had the idea of using faster film for the contrasty light, IIRC because the faster film naturally had lower contrast.

« Reply #26 on: January 02, 2017, 17:49 »
0
you said: "The problem which you originally said you had is due to the way light is reflected."

no, I only used that as an example of how bright the sunlight was, it was bright enough that I am getting reflections off of people's clothing onto their face.

I have 3 cameras. an fdr ax100, a P900, and a coolpixk waterproof camera. the FDR AX100 handles bright sunlight better than the P900 and the waterproof camera. the technology is different between the 3 cameras. I want to buy a camera that does a better job than the 3 cameras that I already have when filming in bright sunlight. the minimum ISO settings are similar and the video quality is vastly different.

I have gone through hundreds of cameras and am unable to determine what measure signifies its performance in bright sunlight.

can anyone recommend how to identify what to look for in a camera, specs wise, that will ensure me that the camera films better in bright sunlight?

thankyou

« Reply #27 on: January 02, 2017, 18:21 »
0
In my opinion no matter how good the camera is you will never obtain an even exposure in bright sunlight because the sensor it is going to expose either for the bright areas in wich case your subject will be dark or if it will expose for the subject then the bright areas will be blown out. You have many options to tweak your lighting with reflectors nd filters and so on but you will not find a camera that can expose perfectly for sky and subject all at the same time and for that reasons the filters and reflectors were invented. or I might not understood your question...I generaly shoot with a dslr with neutral image setings and then tweak the footage in post

« Reply #28 on: January 02, 2017, 18:34 »
0
If you have the budget and time to learn the work flow, a camera that can do raw footage would help, like this one https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/964119-REG/blackmagic_design_blackmagic_production_camera_4k.html

« Reply #29 on: January 02, 2017, 18:41 »
+1
If you have the budget and time to learn the work flow, a camera that can do raw footage would help, like this one https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/964119-REG/blackmagic_design_blackmagic_production_camera_4k.html

I dont think he is willing to tweak his footage in post so RAW shooting its not going to help that much so its better to keep the money and go to a course and understand how light works  ;D

« Reply #30 on: January 03, 2017, 16:09 »
0
very stubbornly still not explaining what exactly his problem or his goal is

SpaceStockFootage

  • Space, Sci-Fi and Astronomy Related Stock Footage

« Reply #31 on: January 03, 2017, 23:45 »
0
If you have the budget and time to learn the work flow, a camera that can do raw footage would help, like this one https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/964119-REG/blackmagic_design_blackmagic_production_camera_4k.html

I dont think he is willing to tweak his footage in post so RAW shooting its not going to help that much so its better to keep the money and go to a course and understand how light works  ;D

Only takes seconds to fix in post, but the storage costs and transfer times would be a bit of a pain.

« Reply #32 on: August 04, 2017, 02:54 »
0
low ISO is best for bright sunlight

« Reply #33 on: August 04, 2017, 03:24 »
+3
low ISO is best for bright sunlight

No need to bring up all these old threads.

« Reply #34 on: August 04, 2017, 14:59 »
+1
low ISO is best for bright sunlight

No need to bring up all these old threads.

Why you guys revive old troll threads?

« Reply #35 on: August 04, 2017, 15:10 »
0
low ISO is best for bright sunlight

No need to bring up all these old threads.

Why you guys revive old troll threads?
Why on earth you want to shoot in bright light?
Go in a shaded area, or wait for sunset or sunrise, like any other photographer

« Reply #36 on: August 05, 2017, 15:14 »
0
I film often in bright sunlight. you can see the colors of clothing reflected off of people's faces.

I want to buy a new camera. what should I look for in a camera in order to make sure it does the best job in regards to filming in bright sunlight?

I read that high ISO is important. would it be true to buy the camera with the highest ISO range?

I currently use the SONY FDR AX100.

any advice is appreciated.
??? Hmmm  :(

Bad Company

« Reply #37 on: August 05, 2017, 20:44 »
+1
low ISO is best for bright sunlight

No need to bring up all these old threads.

Why you guys revive old troll threads?

Because we are bored  8)


« Reply #38 on: August 06, 2017, 02:17 »
+2
low ISO is best for bright sunlight


No need to bring up all these old threads.

Why you guys revive old troll threads?
Why on earth you want to shoot in bright light?
Go in a shaded area, or wait for sunset or sunrise, like any other photographer

That is such a silly statement it might work for landscape photographers but not for sports or street and editorial

« Reply #39 on: August 06, 2017, 16:50 »
+1
filming in bright sunlight, which camera to buy?


The cheapest one you can buy. I mean it. Expensive cameras and lenses are meant for low light situations. For bright sunlight you can use even your smartphone camera.

SpaceStockFootage

  • Space, Sci-Fi and Astronomy Related Stock Footage

« Reply #40 on: August 06, 2017, 21:17 »
0
filming in bright sunlight, which camera to buy?


The cheapest one you can buy. I mean it. Expensive cameras and lenses are meant for low light situations. For bright sunlight you can use even your smartphone camera.

So any blockbuster movie that uses sufficient lighting to replicate bright sunlight conditions, or are actually shooting in bright sunlight conditions... they're ok to shoot on an iPhone? They only pull out the Alexas, Reds and the CineAltas when the gaffer forgets to bring the lighting setup?
« Last Edit: August 06, 2017, 23:23 by SpaceStockFootage »

« Reply #41 on: August 06, 2017, 22:47 »
0
low ISO is best for bright sunlight


No need to bring up all these old threads.

Why you guys revive old troll threads?
Why on earth you want to shoot in bright light?
Go in a shaded area, or wait for sunset or sunrise, like any other photographer

That is such a silly statement it might work for landscape photographers but not for sports or street and editorial

uhm ... I think we're all fairly capable of rolling the iso up a bit if the shutter speed or aperture requires it. The point still remains that lower ISO will collect less light given the other parameters.

« Reply #42 on: August 22, 2017, 23:52 »
+1
Methinks this discussion has run its course.

Actually, it ran its course after the first post.

Anybody who claims he has "gone through hundreds of cameras" and believes a high ISO will help him shoot in bright sunlight is either a troll or terminally hopeless.

Happy 2017, everybody!

+1000 amazing and some of the responses are even More  amazing. WOW. Kinda shocking actually. Dear OP. read what Sean said and go take a class. concentrate on exposure. I had to copy this thread to show students. WOW.

« Reply #43 on: August 23, 2017, 08:40 »
+1
Methinks this discussion has run its course.

Actually, it ran its course after the first post.

Anybody who claims he has "gone through hundreds of cameras" and believes a high ISO will help him shoot in bright sunlight is either a troll or terminally hopeless.

Happy 2017, everybody!


+1000 amazing and some of the responses are even More  amazing. WOW. Kinda shocking actually. Dear OP. read what Sean said and go take a class. concentrate on exposure. I had to copy this thread to show students. WOW.


It's the internet. . . ::)

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