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Author Topic: Sony A6000  (Read 6909 times)

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« on: May 26, 2015, 19:38 »
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Anyone using a Sony A6000 ? I've seen several good reviews on it. I was just wondering if anyone has been using it for stock photography.


« Reply #1 on: May 27, 2015, 09:49 »
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I am using Sony A6000 in addition to my Canon 5DIII, mostly for outdoor shooting where weight is an issue like paddling or hiking, also, experimenting with drone flying.

« Reply #2 on: May 27, 2015, 09:56 »
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I am using Sony A6000 in addition to my Canon 5DIII, mostly for outdoor shooting where weight is an issue like paddling or hiking, also, experimenting with drone flying.

How does the A6000 work for stock? Are images made with it accepted and salable?

I've been considering that camera or Sony's DSCRX10/B Cybershot for a foreign trip next year. I need something easy to carry that can produce stills usable for stock.

Anybody have experience shooting stock with one of those? Other suggestions?


« Reply #3 on: June 29, 2015, 10:07 »
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When it comes to image quality, it's very good (of course, it depends also on the lens), but you shouldn't have any problems getting it accepted at any agency. 24MP, quality-wise comparable to Nikon 7100 (DXO score 82 vs 83).

« Reply #4 on: June 29, 2015, 11:32 »
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Have you used any lens adapter on your camera ?  I hear they are coming out with a Sony A6100 or Sony A7000 with image stabilization built into the body. Just waiting to see what they retail for before going with the Sony A6000.

« Reply #5 on: June 29, 2015, 16:53 »
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I haven't used the camera myself, but know some people using it - just with the kit lens.
Personally, I wouldn't use any adapter, since that defeats its primary advantages being small and inexpensive. If you think, you'll need longer lenses, you may be better off with a larger Sony model (or Nikon 5x00).

Here is a link to an article about a young Hawaii-based photographer with some of his images taken by A6000.

http://www.dpreview.com/articles/8511033648/readers-showcase-raiatea-arcuri

No doubt, the A6000 will be superceded at some time by a newer model.
Nevertheless, this camera is still one of best values around, and much lighter than most of its competitors.
 

PaulieWalnuts

  • On the Wrong Side of the Business
« Reply #6 on: June 29, 2015, 17:16 »
+2
I have an NEX-7 and the lower ISO image quality is excellent. I would think the A6000 is at least as good or better. I use a tripod rather than high ISO so haven't checked. I also have an SEL18200 silver lens and it is surprisingly sharp and versatile. I now have two A7R's, an NEX-7 and a few Sony lenses. My Canon and Nikon gear are collecting dust.

« Reply #7 on: June 29, 2015, 20:25 »
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I have Canon equipment now and thinking about switching over to Sony. I just think Canon & Nikon just aren't keeping up with Sony. I have a lot of Canon glass and just wondered how well they work on the Sony bodies with adapters.

PaulieWalnuts

  • On the Wrong Side of the Business
« Reply #8 on: June 29, 2015, 22:32 »
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I have Canon equipment now and thinking about switching over to Sony. I just think Canon & Nikon just aren't keeping up with Sony. I have a lot of Canon glass and just wondered how well they work on the Sony bodies with adapters.

I tried the Metabones with my Canon lenses on both the NEX-7 and A7R. Some lenses are supported, some aren't. The ones that are supported focus painfully slow. Like several seconds and they may still fail.

But, with the new A7RII that seems to have changed. The new focus system is supposed to match regular focus speeds with an adapter and Canon lens so I'd suggest checking out the A7RII.

« Reply #9 on: February 05, 2016, 04:01 »
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I use A6000 for stock, and it is as good as any APS-C camera.

For lenses I mainly use the 16-70/4 and the 90 mm macro lens. I don't know what exactly my SS acceptance rate is, but I guess it is between 80 and 90%.

The A6300 has just been announced, but it will cost about twice as much as A6000. 

« Reply #10 on: February 05, 2016, 04:49 »
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The A6300 has just been announced, but it will cost about twice as much as A6000.


With 4K video
http://bokeh.digitalrev.com/article/sony-a6300

« Reply #11 on: February 05, 2016, 05:46 »
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The A6300 has just been announced, but it will cost about twice as much as A6000.


With 4K video
http://bokeh.digitalrev.com/article/sony-a6300
And 120 fps 1080P

« Reply #12 on: February 05, 2016, 13:55 »
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Yup ! I am using it till now and it is the one of the most best cameras from the series having the full amazing features and qualit as well.But my camera battry is now week !! hahah

I have a question concerning A7R II if you don't mind. I'm almost to buy one. Yesterday I held it in hands and almost everything suits me. But only one doubt left. Focusing points look quite big. I'm not sure if it will be enough for microstock photography (portraits in particular). I know how high are focus requirements in the microstock industry and with this size of focus points I'm worried that sometimes focus can be on the eyebrow instead of the eye itself (which in my experience with other cameras led to the rejections).

« Reply #13 on: August 22, 2016, 08:34 »
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I am also thinking of buying the Sony A7Rii but find the camera far too expensive. Victor, the A7Rii not good enough for microstock? When they start paying more then 25cent for an image then I might buy the Sony A7Rii. I would like to know if the A6300 is good enough for microstock. The A7Rii with lens is too heavy for the problems I have with my hands and arms.

« Reply #14 on: August 22, 2016, 10:04 »
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I use the a6300.  IMHO it is good enough for ANYTHING. I think 'full frame' is 80% hype.  Wait, make that 90%.  The 10% is extremely low light situations.


« Reply #15 on: August 22, 2016, 10:19 »
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Hello Stockastic, which lens do you use for table top photography? I am so fed up with my Sony RX100M3.  The photos taken outside are too soft, nearly blurry on the sides. I need a camera that is good enough for Alamy. At home, for food photography I have problems with DOF. F11 is too soft and f8 not high enough to get enough DOF. Also, when I zoom in the maximum of 70mm, I get really dark edges. I love that the camera is lightweight but when I look at the photos I have taken in Istanbul, zoomed in at 200%, I could rip my hair out. And the noise reduction has to stop. I have a sharp image, have to set noise slider in LR to 20 if I am lucky and there goes the sharpness. And then I have to sharpen again. Is the Sony A6300 better when it comes to noise? I can't take photos of my Maine Coon cats inside my home. If ISO is 400 I can throw the images in the bin because after noise removal the fur doesn't look nice any longer. I am thinking of buying  the A7ii but I am not sure if the A7ii is actually better. I went to the shop today, held the A7ii with a 55mm lens and found it far too heavy for myself. I need a zoom lens for traveling. Do you use a macro lens for table top photography? If yes which one?

« Reply #16 on: August 22, 2016, 11:30 »
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A6300 handles noise very well.
I have a ISO3200 photo of a bird, that was approved by SS, and the other agencies I upload to.

One thing you can do to reduce noise, and make sharpness look better, is to resize. If a 6000 pixel wide photo is reduced to 3000 pixels, it looks a lot better.

« Reply #17 on: August 22, 2016, 11:38 »
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Jens, do you touch the noise removal slider in Lightroom at all when you shoot with ISO 100 to 400 ?

Sent from my GT-I9505 using Tapatalk


« Reply #18 on: August 22, 2016, 11:40 »
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HappyBunny,

Too many questions, but I can try to answer a couple.  I use the Sony 50mm 1.8 a lot for tabletop, for really small things I add an extension ring, or go to a Rokinon 100mm macro lens.   The a6300 noise is slightly better than the a6300.  In my experience noise problems are mostly due to underexposure; shoot raw, expose well and pull down the highlights as necessary in LR.  With LR's noise reduction and a good exposure I produce good salable images to ISO 1000 and maybe beyond, depending on the subject. 

Never zoom to 200%, you're just chasing phantom problems. 

« Reply #19 on: August 22, 2016, 11:45 »
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When I zoomed in to 100% I had my images rejected for noise. Since I zoom in 200%  I don't get rejections for noise.
Did you mean that  the A6300 is slightly better when it comes to noise than the RX100M3?

« Reply #20 on: August 22, 2016, 11:51 »
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Sony a6000 has an aps c sensor just like the bulky dslrs. So no difference with quality if not better.
« Last Edit: August 22, 2016, 11:57 by MircoV »

« Reply #21 on: August 22, 2016, 11:58 »
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Jens, do you touch the noise removal slider in Lightroom at all when you shoot with ISO 100 to 400 ?

Sent from my GT-I9505 using Tapatalk
My default noise reduction setting is:
Luminance 25
Detail 50
Contrast 0

Color 25
Detail 50
Smoothness 50

Normally I leave the settings there.

« Reply #22 on: August 22, 2016, 12:02 »
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If Canon 50d 60d 70d are good for stock than a sony a6000 is fore sure. You should know that the sensor is as large as any other aps c dslr camera. Its the inside that matters. Sony A7 is smaller from outside then a canon 60d but the A7 has a much larger sensor...full frame. So better image quality then larger canon body. So to answer your question YES....Sony A6000 is more then matching micro. I use the older model sony a nex 6. Shooting at iso 1600 without problem and are all accepted in micros.

« Reply #23 on: August 22, 2016, 12:30 »
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When I zoomed in to 100% I had my images rejected for noise. Since I zoom in 200%  I don't get rejections for noise.
Did you mean that  the A6300 is slightly better when it comes to noise than the RX100M3?

I don't know about the RX100M3.  Check DxOMark for sensor scores. 

« Reply #24 on: August 22, 2016, 12:40 »
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I did check DXO sensor score a few days ago. For Sony RX100M3 about 445. I have not written it down. Just roughly. A6300 around 1450 and A7ii 2240. I am thinking if the A7ii will drop in price when A7Riii comes out. However, I thought about getting the 16 to 70mm lens for A6300 which will be 105mm. More for less weight. I find that great. The 70mm on my camera is just not enough.

« Reply #25 on: August 22, 2016, 13:09 »
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A6300 handles noise very well.
I have a ISO3200 photo of a bird, that was approved by SS, and the other agencies I upload to.

One thing you can do to reduce noise, and make sharpness look better, is to resize. If a 6000 pixel wide photo is reduced to 3000 pixels, it looks a lot better.

Yes - if you have a good bright exposure, you can get an acceptable photo even at 3200.  I've done it with insects.   Really, I have no need for a better sensor, for anything I do.  The a6300 isn't holding me back in any way. 

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