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Author Topic: PSCC and NVIDIA GeForce drivers  (Read 2584 times)

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ShadySue

« on: November 07, 2015, 09:28 »
0
Since PS CC2015, I seem to be having a lot of problems with my Nvidia GeForce driver which seem to be related to Photoshop, even though I'm not always actively using PS when the problem happens (but PS and/or Bridge is nearly always open). I am upgrading my driver about twice a week, but the problems seem to change ...
Anyone else?
(Please don't waste your valuable time giving me technical instructions, I'm just trying to find out whether I need to get some other sort of graphics driver. I wouldn't actually be installing that myself.)
(I didn't have any of these problems before PS CC2015.)
« Last Edit: November 07, 2015, 09:32 by ShadySue »


cuppacoffee

« Reply #1 on: November 07, 2015, 10:15 »
+1
Here's Adobe's troubleshooting page on drivers, maybe that will. It has some step-by-step tests.
https://helpx.adobe.com/photoshop/kb/troubleshoot-gpu-graphics-card.html

Here it is in a nutshell but there are other troubleshooting links on that page.

You can quickly determine if the issue is related to your graphics processor or driver by following these steps:

    Launch Photoshop.
    Choose Edit > Preferences > Performance (Windows) or Photoshop > Preferences > Performance (Mac OS).
    Deselect "Use Graphics Processor."
    Quit and relaunch Photoshop.

If the problem goes away, your graphics processor or driver is likely the issue. See Graphics processor (GPU) troubleshooting for further troubleshooting steps.

ShadySue

« Reply #2 on: November 07, 2015, 10:30 »
0
Tx, I'll give that a try!

« Reply #3 on: November 07, 2015, 14:47 »
0
I'd wonder about the need to keep on updating drivers if you're not a game player, and if the system is working OK.


I'd check to see if the upgrades offer more overall performance, or anything else "essential" but otherwise I wouldn't let it keep updating


I used to and then it broke my system, so now I just update occasionally, or if I have a problem.

w7lwi

  • Those that don't stand up to evil enable evil.
« Reply #4 on: November 07, 2015, 20:02 »
0
I have the same question.  All the NVIDIA upgrades that I've received seem to say they are for better game performance.  Since I don't do gaming, I've never allowed an update.  To date, so far as I know, everything still works just fine and there's no degradation in performance that I'm aware of.  Any reason I should allow an upgrade to my NVIDIA card?

ShadySue

« Reply #5 on: November 07, 2015, 20:19 »
0
My NVIDIA upgrades also say they're for gaming, but the thing I found on Adobe  (different resource to the one linked to above) when I looked for this problem said 'always make sure your graphics driver is up to date'.

As it happened, when I went to follow cuppacoffee's advice, I discovered I had an upgrade to CC2015 waiting, so I tried that first.

Of course, if I could consistently replicate the problems it would be easier, but it seems pretty random, except that whether I'm actually using PS at the time of the problem or something else, I get an Nvidia error and a Photoshop error, sometimes also a Bridge or ACR error too. The Adobe errors are usually just an 'error and had to stop' message. The Nvidia is something about a kernel exception, would I like to go to their help pages, but when I click on the link, it doesn't take me to their help pages.
Also randomly, either when I'm in PS or not (when 'not' it's probably usually when I'm playing  :-[ CandyCrush  :-[ which probably isn't the most resource hogging of games, but WDIK?) the whole screen just goes black, I get the DSub message, as though I'd switched off the computer but forgotten to switch the screen off. The only thing I can do from there is to switch the computer off from the 'big button'.

Anyway, like I said:
I can't replicate it.
I haven't been able to identify anything consistent I'm doing which seems to trigger it, and I don't work with massive hundred-layer files. Ever.
I'll see how it goes with the PS (etc) update, but not holding my breath.

« Reply #6 on: November 07, 2015, 20:55 »
0
Had a lot of troubles too some month ago and could solve the problems with downgrading the NVIDIA drivers to the 2 or 3 years old version I've got on CD-Rom with the NVIDIA card.

« Reply #7 on: November 07, 2015, 21:08 »
0
I have not had any issues.

I am running 350.12 NVIDIA drivers and running PSCC 2015 and LRCC. NVIDIA keeps telling me there is an update but I do not update unless there is a good reason to upgrade.

« Reply #8 on: November 08, 2015, 08:49 »
0
My NVIDIA upgrades also say they're for gaming, but the thing I found on Adobe  (different resource to the one linked to above) when I looked for this problem said 'always make sure your graphics driver is up to date'.

As it happened, when I went to follow cuppacoffee's advice, I discovered I had an upgrade to CC2015 waiting, so I tried that first.

Of course, if I could consistently replicate the problems it would be easier, but it seems pretty random, except that whether I'm actually using PS at the time of the problem or something else, I get an Nvidia error and a Photoshop error, sometimes also a Bridge or ACR error too. The Adobe errors are usually just an 'error and had to stop' message. The Nvidia is something about a kernel exception, would I like to go to their help pages, but when I click on the link, it doesn't take me to their help pages.
Also randomly, either when I'm in PS or not (when 'not' it's probably usually when I'm playing  :-[ CandyCrush  :-[ which probably isn't the most resource hogging of games, but WDIK?) the whole screen just goes black, I get the DSub message, as though I'd switched off the computer but forgotten to switch the screen off. The only thing I can do from there is to switch the computer off from the 'big button'.

Anyway, like I said:
I can't replicate it.
I haven't been able to identify anything consistent I'm doing which seems to trigger it, and I don't work with massive hundred-layer files. Ever.
I'll see how it goes with the PS (etc) update, but not holding my breath.



The "always make sure your drivers are up to date" thing is a sort of "catch all" statement IMO. Unless they test PS with every new driver, how can they tell? Some games for instance work better with older drivers. Some older games will only work with older drivers. Lots of people downgrade drivers to earlier versions to get things to work.


One thing is that your problem may be caused by not completely removing all traces of the old drivers before installing the new. This is a bit of a fiddle, because simply doing an "uninstall" doesn't remove all the traces.


You need to use something like this
http://www.guru3d.com/files-details/display-driver-uninstaller-download.html


or follow the instruction here
http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/faq/id-2284749/completely-uninstall-amd-nvidia-gpu-drivers.html


There are plenty of other tutorial online.


Once you have a working system stop it updating when it want to.


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