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Author Topic: Over 200.000 new files added weekly :(  (Read 15295 times)

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« on: January 12, 2014, 06:46 »
+4
Do people upload their Christmas holidays backlog ? Over 200.000 is definitely too much, uploading now is like throwing the images in the abyss :(


Ron

« Reply #1 on: January 12, 2014, 06:50 »
+3
Yet my sales keep growing.

« Reply #2 on: January 12, 2014, 06:52 »
+1
Mine as well! But these stats make me a bit anxious...

Ron

« Reply #3 on: January 12, 2014, 06:58 »
+1
Yes, its quite daunting, but if you add stuff that isnt a lot out there, you can still make sales. Concepts are a good thing. I dont think of what I do 200k similar images are added. I think people with lifestyle/model images and isolations have the toughest competition. Maybe landscapes as well, depending on where you live.

Beppe Grillo

« Reply #4 on: January 12, 2014, 07:01 »
+19
From one part people complain about too much rejections
From another part people complain about too much file added

Aaaah humans are so strange

« Reply #5 on: January 12, 2014, 07:03 »
+1
From one part people complain about too much rejections
From another part people complain about too much file added

Aaaah humans are so strange

I don't complain about rejections. I wish Shutterstock would reject more.

Ron

« Reply #6 on: January 12, 2014, 07:04 »
+4
From one part people complain about too much rejections
From another part people complain about too much file added

Aaaah humans are so strange

From one part people complain about too much rejections = less potential to make money
From another part people complain about too much file added = less potential to make money

I dont see the strangeness in the two complaints, they are related to each other, not the opposite.

« Reply #7 on: January 12, 2014, 07:29 »
+5
The microstrock concept is that we sell our pictures for one dollar many times, so it becomes sustainable.

The cost of producing an image is returned because it sells many times.

BUT the agencies let us down, they put all the expenses on us, all the postprocessing, categorizing and keywords and all the manufacturing costs. We do all the work.
Yet they deny us the benifit of having many downloads on the images, because they just take more new contributors in.

So the agencies undermine the concept that is the basis of their success, they cheat us and they do not keep their promises.
I can understand that the agencies want to have innovative content, they want new contributors, so they dont stagnate.
Innovations are important in the world of today.
But I cannot understand why they consequently only prey on us, and not let of harvest the benifits.
Well I can. They have the oppertunity, and since we are powerless, they exploit us.
If there were a union of contributing phoitographers. The first it would command was that, the agencies could only take in as many new photographers as the rise in sales allowed.


« Reply #8 on: January 12, 2014, 07:36 »
+4
The microstrock concept is that we sell our pictures for one dollar many times, so it becomes sustainable.

The cost of producing an image is returned because it sells many times.

BUT the agencies let us down, they put all the expenses on us, all the postprocessing, categorizing and keywords and all the manufacturing costs. We do all the work.
Yet they deny us the benifit of having many downloads on the images, because they just take more new contributors in.

So the agencies undermine the concept that is the basis of their success, they cheat us and they do not keep their promises.
I can understand that the agencies want to have innovative content, they want new contributors, so they dont stagnate.
Innovations are important in the world of today.
But I cannot understand why they consequently only prey on us, and not let of harvest the benifits.
Well I can. They have the oppertunity, and since we are powerless, they exploit us.
If there were a union of contributing phoitographers. The first it would command was that, the agencies could only take in as many new photographers as the rise in sales allowed.

Agree. The inflow of new photographers should be limited. 100.000 new files weekly would be more than enough.

« Reply #9 on: January 12, 2014, 07:43 »
+1
I also find a bit unfair that Shutterstock employees have all the perks:
Quote
We know that the trick to keeping awesome people happy is by creating a fun, comfortable environment. This includes competitive pay for top talent, full medical benefits, plus:

Stocked beverage fridges, free breakfasts & snacks
Lunchtime Yoga
Pizza & Massage Fridays
Happy hours and killer Summer & Holiday parties

And we, photographers (especially the top tier, that has given SS the most) are treated as crowd, not individual employees as we deserve.

« Reply #10 on: January 12, 2014, 07:55 »
0
I also find a bit unfair that Shutterstock employees have all the perks:
Quote
We know that the trick to keeping awesome people happy is by creating a fun, comfortable environment. This includes competitive pay for top talent, full medical benefits, plus:

Stocked beverage fridges, free breakfasts & snacks
Lunchtime Yoga
Pizza & Massage Fridays
Happy hours and killer Summer & Holiday parties

And we, photographers (especially the top tier, that has given SS the most) are treated as crowd, not individual employees as we deserve.
I agree. Our work is used to pay for extensive benifits for a "bunch of lucky ones". Compares to parasites.

« Reply #11 on: January 12, 2014, 08:14 »
+11
The folks at Shutterstock do the great work of course, but so do high tier photographers who are with SS almost from the beginning. Then, why aren't we given any perks? I don't ask for yoga, massages etc, but a pay rise to let's say 0.44$ and being more selective in approval process (at least in limiting access to newcomers)!
« Last Edit: January 12, 2014, 08:17 by niserin »

« Reply #12 on: January 12, 2014, 08:18 »
+6
The folks at Shutterstock do the great work of course, but so do high tier photographers who are with SS almost from the beginning. Then, why aren't we given any perks? I don't ask for yoga, massages etc, but a pay rise to let's say 0.44$ and being more selective in approval process (at least for newcomers)!

I would love it, if they had a yoga massage artist flown in and massage me on Saturday. But as you say, less can do .44$ would be nice. And it is years ago since we had any rise.

« Reply #13 on: January 12, 2014, 08:23 »
0
The folks at Shutterstock do the great work of course, but so do high tier photographers who are with SS almost from the beginning. Then, why aren't we given any perks? I don't ask for yoga, massages etc, but a pay rise to let's say 0.44$ and being more selective in approval process (at least for newcomers)!

I would love it, if they had a yoga massage artist flown in and massage me on Saturday. But as you say, less can do .44$ would be nice. And it is years ago since we had any rise.

 ;D ;D

Ron

« Reply #14 on: January 12, 2014, 08:24 »
+7
We are suppliers not employees. Asking to be treated as an employee is nonsense.

« Reply #15 on: January 12, 2014, 08:39 »
+5
The folks at Shutterstock do the great work of course, but so do high tier photographers who are with SS almost from the beginning. Then, why aren't we given any perks? I don't ask for yoga, massages etc, but a pay rise to let's say 0.44$ and being more selective in approval process (at least in limiting access to newcomers)!
Newcomers are limited by the extremely tough entry test, which nobody I refer seems able to get past even those with a lifetime's work behind them in commercial photography.
It certainly would be nice to see an increase for hitting 50k or 100k sales but with shareholders to keep happy that doesn't seem likely to happen

« Reply #16 on: January 12, 2014, 08:40 »
+2
I dont want to be treated as an employee. If you do - just apply for a job with them...


ShadySue

« Reply #17 on: January 12, 2014, 08:41 »
+6
We are suppliers not employees. Asking to be treated as an employee is nonsense.
Expecting a fair return for each image sold is perfectly reasonable, expecially if they want people to supply other than the generic high-supply, high demand images.

Beppe Grillo

« Reply #18 on: January 12, 2014, 08:59 »
+9
From one part people complain about too much rejections
From another part people complain about too much file added

Aaaah humans are so strange

I don't complain about rejections. I wish Shutterstock would reject more.

I find your sentence incomplete.
I think you wish that Shutterstock would reject more images from other people.


(Honestly I too! lol)
« Last Edit: January 12, 2014, 09:02 by Beppe Grillo »

« Reply #19 on: January 12, 2014, 09:29 »
+4
Personally, I try not to fret over a number like that because I have zero control over it. Also, I'm a detail freak and as such can't infer anything from a random number since I don't know how many contributors uploaded or what they uploaded or whether their portfolios sell.

For all I know 20% of it could be girls or blokes not doing much other than flash their teeth at the camera or yet another 5,000 images of some rock in Utah.

In any event, 200,000 is mere plankton when you think about how many images are produced globally every day - and I mean commercial work, not just snapshots.


« Reply #20 on: January 12, 2014, 09:38 »
0
Personally, I try not to fret over a number like that because I have zero control over it. Also, I'm a detail freak and as such can't infer anything from a random number since I don't know how many contributors uploaded or what they uploaded or whether their portfolios sell.

For all I know 20% of it could be girls or blokes not doing much other than flash their teeth at the camera or yet another 5,000 images of some rock in Utah.

In any event, 200,000 is mere plankton when you think about how many images are produced globally every day - and I mean commercial work, not just snapshots.

Well, that's true, well said!

« Reply #21 on: January 12, 2014, 09:42 »
+14
I also find a bit unfair that Shutterstock employees have all the perks:
Quote
We know that the trick to keeping awesome people happy is by creating a fun, comfortable environment. This includes competitive pay for top talent, full medical benefits, plus:

Stocked beverage fridges, free breakfasts & snacks
Lunchtime Yoga
Pizza & Massage Fridays
Happy hours and killer Summer & Holiday parties

And we, photographers (especially the top tier, that has given SS the most) are treated as crowd, not individual employees as we deserve.

As far as I'm concerned we contributors already have the greatest 'perks' of all. We get to work from our homes, at whatever time we choose and for as many or few hours as we feel like. We don't waste time and money commuting and are not subject to the controls, restrictions and assessments of employees.

Would you really give all that up for a free slice of pizza and a 5-minute massage once a week?

« Reply #22 on: January 12, 2014, 09:43 »
+1
I also find a bit unfair that Shutterstock employees have all the perks:
Quote
We know that the trick to keeping awesome people happy is by creating a fun, comfortable environment. This includes competitive pay for top talent, full medical benefits, plus:

Stocked beverage fridges, free breakfasts & snacks
Lunchtime Yoga
Pizza & Massage Fridays
Happy hours and killer Summer & Holiday parties


I'd never complain about that, I'm actually happy about it. That's one of the best investments a company can do and wouldn't expect otherwise from the most successful agency out there.

Shelma1

« Reply #23 on: January 12, 2014, 10:05 »
+18
I also find a bit unfair that Shutterstock employees have all the perks:
Quote
We know that the trick to keeping awesome people happy is by creating a fun, comfortable environment. This includes competitive pay for top talent, full medical benefits, plus:

Stocked beverage fridges, free breakfasts & snacks
Lunchtime Yoga
Pizza & Massage Fridays
Happy hours and killer Summer & Holiday parties

And we, photographers (especially the top tier, that has given SS the most) are treated as crowd, not individual employees as we deserve.

These perks are there to keep employees working longer hours. Especially Friday perks. People won't be in as big a hurry to get home if they know their free pizza or massage is coming up. It's much less expensive to give one employee a free slice of pizza every week and get 10 extra hours out of her than to hire more employees to work the hours current employees are covering in unpaid overtime.

I've worked for many years in "fun" environments where we get basketball courts, pool tables, on-site gyms and showers, free drinks (heck, we even had "drinks cart" every Friday at 6 p.m. at one ad agency, where we were served beer and hard liquor). The trade off is that you dedicate your life to your job, working 60+ hours per week and hardly ever taking a vacation because there's always an "emergency'"

I look forward to leaving that behind for the freedom to do illustrations at home. Freedom is the world's biggest perk, IMO.

ShadySue

« Reply #24 on: January 12, 2014, 10:24 »
+2
Would you really give all that up for a free slice of pizza and a 5-minute massage once a week?
Not a treat for me pizza for me is cheap, fast and filling, not a treat, and massage is just embarrassing.
As for the drinks cart Shelma mentioned, you just have to worry about how to get home if you're not on a bus/train route, so bizarre. Or go without, so it's a hollow perk (no treat for me anyway, I don't drink beer or spirits).
But I'm with those who say that personally disposable time is far more important than all that stuff.


 

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