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Author Topic: iStock spoof video  (Read 13933 times)

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bittersweet

« on: January 09, 2009, 01:15 »
0
... full of Yuri's images  :D
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G7MBpQJ-zsg" target="_blank" class="aeva_link bbc_link new_win">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G7MBpQJ-zsg</a>




jsnover

« Reply #1 on: January 09, 2009, 01:47 »
0
That's lovely, but they left out the jumping goldfish! No stock cliche spoof can be counted complete without a talented goldfish or two...

« Reply #2 on: January 09, 2009, 02:41 »
0
I see kat youtubed one of her
cage blows
(spotted it when I checked the vid the OP linked to). Demonoid has
videoed
a few of his too - interesting stuff (for designers and digital artists).
« Last Edit: January 09, 2009, 02:48 by averil »

Microbius

« Reply #3 on: January 09, 2009, 03:39 »
0
All those images have been nicked, hence the watermarks.
If they wanted to make a spoof, funny as it is, they should have purchased the images.

RacePhoto

« Reply #4 on: January 09, 2009, 04:00 »
0
All those images have been nicked, hence the watermarks.
If they wanted to make a spoof, funny as it is, they should have purchased the images.

Legally, I don't think it's necessary. Do you want the details?  ;D

Always up for a good mystery.

Microbius

« Reply #5 on: January 09, 2009, 04:14 »
0
All those images have been nicked, hence the watermarks.
If they wanted to make a spoof, funny as it is, they should have purchased the images.

Legally, I don't think it's necessary. Do you want the details?  ;D

Always up for a good mystery.


I would be interested to know why not (?)

« Reply #6 on: January 09, 2009, 08:26 »
0
eh... because they don't use those images to promote/mention anything else than Istock itself, maybe that's why?

Microbius

« Reply #7 on: January 09, 2009, 08:30 »
0
Could you explain a bit better, I'm not sure how that works. Would I for example be able to use any images from IStock without paying on a blog where I discuss my experience on IStock?
If not why not if the video is okay?
The contributor is the copyright holder, not IStock, does this make a difference?
Just interested to know what the legal stance is on this.
I know if I'd taken any of those photos I wouldn't be happy to see them having the p*ss taken out of them YouTube without getting my commission!

« Reply #8 on: January 09, 2009, 08:58 »
0
I am just curious, who hates IS so much to make this video and to upload it to youtube??  :D This video needs much more than few minutes to be made. When we consider the time spent on idea and text writing....
Wow, that must be somebody pissed off exactly because of IS  ;)
« Last Edit: January 09, 2009, 09:00 by whitechild »

bittersweet

« Reply #9 on: January 09, 2009, 09:03 »
0
I viewed it as more a statement on stock photography than on istock per se... especially since the images they focused on were not exclusives and can be purchased at several microstock agencies.

Though surely your experience has shown you that some people can become so fixated by their dislike of something that they can start to lose all credibility.

« Reply #10 on: January 09, 2009, 09:06 »
0
Yes, probably this is more about stock photography, than on IS. :)

« Reply #11 on: January 09, 2009, 09:30 »
0
Oh, that's great.

« Reply #12 on: January 09, 2009, 09:47 »
0
Could you explain a bit better, I'm not sure how that works. Would I for example be able to use any images from IStock without paying on a blog where I discuss my experience on IStock?
If not why not if the video is okay?
The contributor is the copyright holder, not IStock, does this make a difference?
Just interested to know what the legal stance is on this.
I know if I'd taken any of those photos I wouldn't be happy to see them having the p*ss taken out of them YouTube without getting my commission!
well if your blog is all about istock and you don't make money with ads on it with another compianies, I guess it would be the same. Now istock may not be happy of negative publicity they might be getting with this video (I doubt they would bother with it anyway), that could be a greater deal than mentioning istock with images sold on istock, carrying istock logo all over it. They for sure don't want to be bashed by the images that are annacurate and come from the different source.

Another trend I noticed about microstockers is how fast they jump to "I want my money back" . For instance the first reactions on the post about image found in use is "you should have gotten at least an EL for it", without even thinking maybe the photographer did get paid for en extended use and everything is just fine.

bittersweet

« Reply #13 on: January 09, 2009, 10:53 »
0
well if your blog is all about istock and you don't make money with ads on it with another compianies, I guess it would be the same.

If by this you mean that if someone happens to write a blog about istock, then it's okay for them to use watermarked images in that blog, you are mistaken.

« Reply #14 on: January 09, 2009, 11:17 »
0
No longer available  ??? What did I miss?

« Reply #15 on: January 09, 2009, 11:21 »
0
I'm pretty sure that Arcurs himself pointed out this video on his own blog a few months ago and had a laugh over it.  If it wasn't this video it was similar.

bittersweet

« Reply #16 on: January 09, 2009, 11:37 »
0
No longer available  ??? What did I miss?

Really? I can still see it.

« Reply #17 on: January 09, 2009, 11:52 »
0
I was able to view it as well. I think it's funny.. applies to all stock in general   ;D

« Reply #18 on: January 09, 2009, 12:32 »
0
Maybe it's my firewall

RacePhoto

« Reply #19 on: January 09, 2009, 13:26 »
0
Parody

« Reply #20 on: January 09, 2009, 15:07 »
0
For editorial use (and I think parody would come under that category) it's generally allowed to use some fraction of a copyrighted work without permission. A blog about stock photography by a stock photographer would probably be considered as promotion and not as editorial, hence commercial use requiring proper licensing.

« Reply #21 on: January 09, 2009, 21:34 »
0
Parody

Yes, parody and satire are 'fair use'. (I'm not an IP attorney, but if I put on a suit I could pretend to be one in a stock photo.)

RacePhoto

« Reply #22 on: January 11, 2009, 00:52 »
0
Parody

Yes, parody and satire are 'fair use'. (I'm not an IP attorney, but if I put on a suit I could pretend to be one in a stock photo.)

OK I'm convinced, it's not parody it's satire.  ;D

YouTube isn't a commercial site and iStock has videos up there, along with iStock contributors, and other agencies and contributors. I'm thinking that the fact that it's not selling anything and could be seen as editorial or parody or satire, would be a defense. This is why people can do parodys of pop tunes with different words and not be sued. As for using iStock images, I'm not so sure. But above all that, and I don't really find it a direct criticism of iStock as much as stock, stock, it was pretty funny.

Sometimes these parodies can be as beneficial as paid advertisements because of the attention they bring to the real source. Also if iStock had a legal grounds for having this humor removed, it would have contacted YouTube and it would be gone.

« Reply #23 on: January 11, 2009, 01:12 »
0
As for using iStock images, I'm not so sure. But above all that, and I don't really find it a direct criticism of iStock as much as stock, stock, it was pretty funny.


Parody is a form of fair use in all copyright legal systems I know of. The video was funny and not slanderous at all. In fact, to me, it felt like a good alternative commercial for Istock. If I wouldn't know Istock as a designer/customer, I surely would be very curious to visit the site after seeing the video. Because every designer knows photos for marketing are fake, staged, and bigger than life.

The YT video reminded me of the famous ads that John Cleese made for Compaq long ago. He ridiculized the Compaq, comparing it to a goldfish etc... The ad campaign was very successful.
here
,
here
,
here
.

Microbius

« Reply #24 on: January 12, 2009, 07:49 »
0

Parody is a form of fair use in all copyright legal systems I know of. The video was funny and not slanderous at all. In fact, to me, it felt like a good alternative commercial for Istock. If I wouldn't know Istock as a designer/customer, I surely would be very curious to visit the site after seeing the video. Because every designer knows photos for marketing are fake, staged, and bigger than life.

The YT video reminded me of the famous ads that John Cleese made for Compaq long ago. He ridiculized the Compaq, comparing it to a goldfish etc... The ad campaign was very successful.
here, here, here.


Thanks very much, that clears it up!


 

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