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Author Topic: Do you use the lens hood for isolations?  (Read 3630 times)

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« on: March 13, 2007, 06:56 »
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Hi all!

Do you use the lens hood for isolations? Is it useful to enhance the contrast / correct exposure of the object while still keeping your background white?

Thanks,
Michael


eendicott

« Reply #1 on: March 13, 2007, 07:37 »
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Always, always, always, always, always, always, always, always, always use your lens hood (really).

There is a theory that it does improve contrast but most importantly, if your tripod gets knocked over, or if you drop your camera, it offers as much (if not more) protection to your lens as a UV filter.  I know a few people that have tripped on their tripod or their flash cords and knocked over their cameras breaking their lenses.

Last December, I was shooting pictures in a snow storm, I slipped and fell dropping my 20d with my 70-200 f/2.8L about 5 feet off the ground.  The lens hood saved my lens.


« Reply #2 on: March 13, 2007, 07:56 »
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I'll second the comments protecting the lens.  You don't even have to drop a camera to appreciate that.  When you're moving around in a crowded room, or at a sports event I'd always rather bump the plastic lens hood than the filter/front element on something!

That asside, I think on the longer lenses the hood definately makes a difference to contrast/haze etc, but on wide lenses I'm not so sure..  The hood on my 17-40 just plain looks silly, but I always use it if I'm out and about to help protect the expensive shiny bits.. :-)

Cheers, Me.

« Reply #3 on: September 08, 2007, 23:25 »
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the hood on a lens also helps to prevent lens flare from the sun or your lighting setup. Each hood is designed for the lens that it was sold with

« Reply #4 on: September 09, 2007, 04:57 »
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I'll second the comments protecting the lens.  You don't even have to drop a camera to appreciate that.  When you're moving around in a crowded room, or at a sports event I'd always rather bump the plastic lens hood than the filter/front element on something!
I'll third that - I just bought my 3rd lens hood for my 70-200mm!

« Reply #5 on: September 09, 2007, 12:35 »
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Quote
The lens hood saved my lens.

Mine too.

« Reply #6 on: September 09, 2007, 17:06 »
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Just use it.  ;)

cheers.

« Reply #7 on: September 09, 2007, 18:56 »
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I don't use a hood for my macro lens, but I do use it for my telephoto lens.

« Reply #8 on: September 09, 2007, 19:36 »
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Hi all!

Do you use the lens hood for isolations? Is it useful to enhance the contrast / correct exposure of the object while still keeping your background white?

Thanks,
Michael

This is with respect to product photography using a light box?

A lens hood won't correct exposure, all it does (apart from the protection mentioned by other posters) is prevent off axis light falling onto the lens and bouncing around inside - this light can reduce contrast and introduce lens flare.

To keep your background white you need to be aware of the metering capabilities of your camera. The camera light meter reads the light reflected from the object and background and calculates an exposure designed to render the scene a mid grey (18% grey). If you have a lot of background in the scene, the image will be under exposed by a couple of stops. A black background is the reverse and will be over exposed to render it grey.



 

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