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Author Topic: How To Use a Ringflash  (Read 4571 times)

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« on: January 17, 2013, 15:29 »
+5
Here's a nice little talk about using a ringflash ... for those who are interested.
Using a Ring Flash in the studio


« Reply #1 on: January 17, 2013, 18:10 »
0
Thanks Tyler, good video, very comprehensive.

« Reply #2 on: January 17, 2013, 19:17 »
+1
Ring flashes are often used in macro, so you can raise your aperture from 5,6 to 16 and such get a better dof.
BUT with the better dof of the ring flash also comes a flat and too even light. And with macro, shadows are important, to enhance details like scales or hairs, so the ring flash is both a curse and a deliberance.

There are people who have blinded parts of the flash to control the shadows.
They are succesfull, but still the light comes from the camera and not from above or from the side, and that is impossible to do anything about.

I would say a ring flash is only meaningfull as a fill light as long as the main lights are quite a bit stronger.
« Last Edit: January 17, 2013, 19:21 by JPSDK »

« Reply #3 on: January 18, 2013, 10:34 »
0
Ring flashes are often used in macro, so you can raise your aperture from 5,6 to 16 and such get a better dof.
BUT with the better dof of the ring flash also comes a flat and too even light. And with macro, shadows are important, to enhance details like scales or hairs, so the ring flash is both a curse and a deliberance.

There are people who have blinded parts of the flash to control the shadows.
They are succesfull, but still the light comes from the camera and not from above or from the side, and that is impossible to do anything about.

I would say a ring flash is only meaningfull as a fill light as long as the main lights are quite a bit stronger.

This is what makes photography an art. Although what you say has total merit, I totally disagree. I always thought ring flash results look best when it's used  on camera as the principle light source. Usually against a flat background to show those cool looking shadows.

I made one once using a set of six par30 lights in a hexagonal pattern mounted on a piece of plywood. It works quite well and of course can be used for video but usually the subject can't look at it, it's just too bright. Plus there is a chance you can burn someone (especially yourself) quite badly.


RacePhoto

« Reply #5 on: January 21, 2013, 11:08 »
0
Ah and Mat you mentioned one more "watch out for" with the ring flash. The reflection is very noticeable in many shots.

Like everything else, it's a tool and useful when used properly, can be a problem with some of the added negative side effects.

Funny Zeus, and you could make a toasted cheese sandwich at the same time to did the shoot?  :)

« Reply #6 on: January 21, 2013, 11:18 »
0


Funny Zeus, and you could make a toasted cheese sandwich at the same time to did the shoot?  :)

Grilled cheese sandwiches or you can open your own gyro stand and shoot passport photos on the side.

ShadySue

« Reply #7 on: January 21, 2013, 11:36 »
0
Thanks, Leaf!


 

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