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Author Topic: question about clothing colors in bright daylight  (Read 3485 times)

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« on: May 22, 2018, 04:58 »
0
I am filming business people in bright daylight. it makes sense that they would wear a white business shirt and a dark grey jacket.

Any advice for dealing with exposure issues? any special camera settings to compensate for light metering on the person's clothing?
here is an example: https://www.shutterstock.com/image-photo/happy-cute-person-1034063050?src=3NJblOZvOora7fKSkD1WEg-3-11

or should I just do editing in post? I prefer to shoot everything right and reduce computer work.
----

I have the same problem with old actors who have white hair. the photos sometimes come out blurry or they just look weird.
here is a sample: https://www.shutterstock.com/image-photo/confused-retired-male-1011382726

any tricks to making the white hair look less goofy? should I film him with white shirts, or on a white background?


dpimborough

« Reply #1 on: May 22, 2018, 06:17 »
0
Ever heard of scrims or diffusers or perhaps open shade???

« Reply #2 on: May 22, 2018, 06:26 »
0
you said: "Ever heard of scrims or diffusers or perhaps open shade???"

I have reviewed where people demonstrate these techniques on youtube, and I am not happy with the resulting quality of the skin color or shading on the model. I am looking for a solution whereby I can get the best photo with natural lighting.

« Reply #3 on: May 22, 2018, 08:16 »
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I have a photo that looks weird because of the lighting. I am not an expert photographer. can you please tell me, using a Nikon D3400 style camera, what function I could have used to correct the lighting / exposure with this image:
https://www.shutterstock.com/image-photo/female-dance-student-posing-1031184745

here is a sample of a similar photo with a similar pose, similar clothing, which does not have the lighting blown out, even thought it was also filmed in bright sunlight (and with a 1" sensor):
https://www.shutterstock.com/image-photo/student-teen-girls-school-559301686

I know how to fix it in software. I need to know how to fix it while I am taking the photo. please tell me which function or method you would use to correct the first photo.

thankyou
« Last Edit: May 22, 2018, 08:21 by unnonimus »

« Reply #4 on: May 22, 2018, 08:24 »
+1
There is no fixing it.  The light that comes off the subject is recorded by the sensor.  Either you modify the light or you fix it in post.

« Reply #5 on: May 22, 2018, 08:38 »
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I just had the idea next time I will take the same photo with a variety of metering and exposure settings and maybe I will figure out how to fix it. thanks anyway

« Reply #6 on: May 22, 2018, 10:39 »
+2
Metering is irrelevant.  If you expose it darker, everything is darker.  If you expose it lighter, everything is lighter.  Theres no affecting the light area without affecting everything else.

« Reply #7 on: May 22, 2018, 13:46 »
0
I just had the idea next time I will take the same photo with a variety of metering and exposure settings and maybe I will figure out how to fix it. thanks anyway
Only Scotty in Star Trek can fix the laws of physics


 

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