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Author Topic: Insert photo (with ID) from Shutterstock to my seminary work  (Read 4637 times)

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« on: December 19, 2012, 06:26 »
0
Hey, i have a question. Can i insert photo like this (http://image.shutterstock.com/display_pic_with_logo/936253/121802413/stock-photo-christmas-gingerbread-with-red-blurred-background-looks-like-fireworks-121802413.jpg [nofollow]), i mean save it and inser it to my school work, photo include ID and microstocksite so i think that can be ok? Am I right? I am writing School seminary work about microstock so I need some examples from other photographers.


« Reply #1 on: December 19, 2012, 06:28 »
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do you mean without purchasing it?

« Reply #2 on: December 19, 2012, 06:34 »
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Yes, he can.
It is fair use, for school works, and for critique.
Quite relevant actually. And the copyright mark is not touched.

« Reply #3 on: December 19, 2012, 06:57 »
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Yes i mean without purchase, ok thank you :)

« Reply #4 on: December 19, 2012, 07:20 »
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Yes, he can.
It is fair use, for school works,
So does that go for presentations that students do to show in class? My daughter was preparing a power point presentation yesterday and had a SS waterrmarked photo in it and I told her that it was stealing to use it. 

ShadySue

« Reply #5 on: December 19, 2012, 07:32 »
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Yes, he can.
It is fair use, for school works,
So does that go for presentations that students do to show in class? My daughter was preparing a power point presentation yesterday and had a SS waterrmarked photo in it and I told her that it was stealing to use it.
The law is probably different in different countries, but in the UK that would be OK.

« Reply #6 on: December 19, 2012, 07:36 »
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Yes, he can.
It is fair use, for school works,
So does that go for presentations that students do to show in class? My daughter was preparing a power point presentation yesterday and had a SS waterrmarked photo in it and I told her that it was stealing to use it.
The law is probably different in different countries, but in the UK that would be OK.
Thank you.  I have no problem if any students want to use my images in school work.

« Reply #7 on: December 19, 2012, 07:59 »
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The fair use legislation is quite alike in most countries:

Fair use: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fair_use

And the argumentation (balance):
TRIPs) Article 13 allows for uses "which do not conflict with a normal exploitation of the work and do not unreasonably prejudice the legitimate interests of the right holder."

Point is, students are not exploiting the work, they are learning, which is a good thing, and legislation tries to encourage it.

red

« Reply #8 on: December 19, 2012, 08:00 »
+6
Yes and No, but it's a commendable thing to ask first. There are many sources for free images for educational use and those should be used first. Microstock images are copyright and should not be used unless the student asks permission of the copyright holder and lists who owns the original copyright and where it can be found (which you said that you would do). It's never too early to teach students about copyright infringement. If they start out believing that images on the internet are "free" they will only perpetuate that myth.

That being said, you may be able to claim fair use. In the US this is the guideline -

"Educators, scholars, and students should credit the sources and display the copyright notice(s) with any copyright ownership information shown in the original source, for all images digitized by educators, scholars, and students, including those digitized under fair use. Crediting the source means adequately identifying the source of the work, giving a full bibliographic description where available (including the creator/author, title, publisher, and place and date of publication) or citing the electronic address if the work is from a network source. Educators, scholars, and students should retain any copyright notice or other proprietary rights notice placed by the copyright owner or image archive or collection on the digital image, unless they know that the work has entered the public domain or that the copyright ownership has changed. In those cases when source credits and copyright ownership information cannot be displayed on the screen with the image for educational reasons (e.g., during examinations), this information should still be linked to the image."

« Reply #9 on: December 19, 2012, 08:03 »
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BUT

IF the OP is holding a seminar about microstock, and gets PAID for it. It is NOT fair use.

« Reply #10 on: December 19, 2012, 10:45 »
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Yes and No, but it's a commendable thing to ask first. There are many sources for free images for educational use and those should be used first. Microstock images are copyright and should not be used unless the student asks permission of the copyright holder and lists who owns the original copyright and where it can be found (which you said that you would do). It's never too early to teach students about copyright infringement. If they start out believing that images on the internet are "free" they will only perpetuate that myth.

That being said, you may be able to claim fair use. In the US this is the guideline -

"Educators, scholars, and students should credit the sources and display the copyright notice(s) with any copyright ownership information shown in the original source, for all images digitized by educators, scholars, and students, including those digitized under fair use. Crediting the source means adequately identifying the source of the work, giving a full bibliographic description where available (including the creator/author, title, publisher, and place and date of publication) or citing the electronic address if the work is from a network source. Educators, scholars, and students should retain any copyright notice or other proprietary rights notice placed by the copyright owner or image archive or collection on the digital image, unless they know that the work has entered the public domain or that the copyright ownership has changed. In those cases when source credits and copyright ownership information cannot be displayed on the screen with the image for educational reasons (e.g., during examinations), this information should still be linked to the image."

Wise (and interesting!) words as always.

« Reply #11 on: December 19, 2012, 15:28 »
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Agree, but i am writing Seminary work about Microstock sites and I need some examples from Microstock sites, not from free sources of photos for education system. I need compare my photos with other authors of stock photos etc.

« Reply #12 on: December 19, 2012, 17:47 »
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The question is...
Are you earning money from it or is it a learning process?

And yes, if you are writing about microstock, you need microstock examples.
But if you are earning money, it is commercial, and you will have to commercially licence the pictures.

« Reply #13 on: December 19, 2012, 18:48 »
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The question is...
Are you earning money from it or is it a learning process?


It can be both, teachers earn money.

« Reply #14 on: December 19, 2012, 19:11 »
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The question is...
Are you earning money from it or is it a learning process?


It can be both, teachers earn money.

Ja, but thats not relevant.
Does the money come from the pictures we are talking about or does it come from wages?
Normally the pictures would just be samples in a learning process.
Like a picture of a uboat in a physics lesson about pressure. We are not talking about a book, but pictures that occur in students papers.
Here we have a guy writing about microstock, if he is a student, the pictures are fair trade, if he is a teacher, and earns money from it, it might be a bit more complicated and boils down to if his activities takes commercial value out of the pictures, as if they were resold.

« Reply #15 on: December 20, 2012, 04:55 »
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The question is...
Are you earning money from it or is it a learning process?


It can be both, teachers earn money.

Ja, but thats not relevant.
Does the money come from the pictures we are talking about or does it come from wages?
Normally the pictures would just be samples in a learning process.
Like a picture of a uboat in a physics lesson about pressure. We are not talking about a book, but pictures that occur in students papers.
Here we have a guy writing about microstock, if he is a student, the pictures are fair trade, if he is a teacher, and earns money from it, it might be a bit more complicated and boils down to if his activities takes commercial value out of the pictures, as if they were resold.
Sounds like it's a bit of a grey area.

« Reply #16 on: December 20, 2012, 05:28 »
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Very.
Laws are there to handle conflicts between interests.
Its not truth or untruth, its negotiations and balancing interests.

There are blogs out there that make money on for example critizising images, remember the 10 worst stock photos and the like, they would claim it to be fair use, because of critisism.
They are right, and its the same with news media. And at the same time, they are wrong, especially if their core product are the pictures themselves.

In the concrete case, we are missing some informations.
And I would guess that the OP sits there and calculates if he is a teacher who earns money or not.


ShadySue

« Reply #17 on: December 20, 2012, 07:24 »
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And I would guess that the OP sits there and calculates if he is a teacher who earns money or not.

If a teacher using a smartboard, you could set up a bookmarked page showing what you want from each of the agencies you want to show and link to them during your presentation.

« Reply #18 on: December 20, 2012, 08:01 »
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I mean seminary work which isn't profitable, ofc...

« Reply #19 on: December 20, 2012, 12:35 »
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Then it is fair use.


 

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