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Author Topic: URGENT: Moneybookers scam  (Read 8535 times)

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« on: June 30, 2013, 03:28 »
+3
I don't usually fall for phishing emails, but this one was very professionally done:
The text starts with "We would like to inform you that your account is pending closure for failing to accept the new Skrill (Moneybookers) Account Terms of Use and the Privacy Policy until the 31th of May, 2013." From and Reply-to emails are both verification@moneybookers.com. When I clicked on the link, I was led to a website that looks exactly like moneybookers.com. The only difference was that I was asked for my birth date on the second page, which made me check the domain name. The domain name is http://www.moneyboiokers.com.

I would recommend anybody who have gone through their login procedure to log in to their real Moneybookers account and change the password immediately.


« Reply #1 on: June 30, 2013, 03:38 »
+1
I've had 2 of those.  Sent the info to moneybookers.  They're aware of it and give details here http://www.moneybookers.com/ads/moneybookers-scam-information/phishing/
It was quite good but they didn't have my name, just the email address and I would never click on a link in an email, I always go to the actual site.

Does make me wonder if I should change my email address though.

fritz

  • I love Tom and Jerry music

« Reply #2 on: June 30, 2013, 03:48 »
+2
I already contact MB. Here is the answer:

Dear    xxxxxxxxx,
Thank you for your e-mail.

Please be informed that the email you have received is a scam, trying to steal personal and financial information from you and abusing the name of our company. Our team has already taken appropriate action in order to prevent further abuse.

Please be reminded that:

1. The Skrill official website is  www.Skrill.com and any other URL should be considered false.
2. Skrill requires that you access your account ONLY using the login link on the Skrill home page.
3. Skrill and its representatives will NEVER send you an email asking you to provide your login details within a form provided or to click on a hyper link to access your account.
4. Always check whether you are accessing your Skrill account from a secured connection (https:// - thes indicates the page is secured).Always check whether a 'padlock' is present in the bottom right-hand corner of your browser. Double click the padlock to verify that the security certificate is issued to www.Skrill.com. If you have already followed the link provided in the mail mentioned
and entered your personal details, please be advised to immediately login to your Skrill account (if you have one) and change your password.
5. Please always update your anti-virus tools.

So be careful, the scam mail starts with dear xxxxxxxxx@mail.com and the mail from MB starts with your real name and surname.

Ron

« Reply #3 on: June 30, 2013, 03:52 »
+1
@ OP - To be frank, that sounds like a typical phishing email like all the others.

Phishing emails always:

* never address you by your name
* create a panic by saying something is wrong with your account
* set a deadline or something will happen
* ask you to click a link

To prevent becoming a victim:

* check the URL by hoovering over the link in the email. It will show the true URL
* never click a link in an email
* always login via your own trusted website
* delete the email (after forwarding it to the company - see below)

To help fight phishing scams:

* forward the original email as attachment to the spoof department of the company, in this case security@skrill.com for PayPal spoof@paypal.com
** It needs to forwarded as attachment so that they can read the original internet headers in the offending email


Here is an anti phishing quiz that can help one educate itself on phishing
https://www.paypal.com/webapps/mpp/security/antiphishing-antiphishingquiz


At least they didnt get you this time, but I would still recommend to run a virus scan on your PC because the offending website could also install malicious software on your PC.

gillian vann

  • *Gillian*
« Reply #4 on: June 30, 2013, 04:45 »
0
@ OP - To be frank, that sounds like a typical phishing email like all the others.

Phishing emails always:

* never address you by your name
* create a panic by saying something is wrong with your account
* set a deadline or something will happen
* ask you to click a link

To prevent becoming a victim:

* check the URL by hoovering over the link in the email. It will show the true URL
* never click a link in an email
* always login via your own trusted website
* delete the email (after forwarding it to the company - see below)

they also often contain hilarious spelling mistakes. like "hoovering", which is what my dogs do to food.   ;D


« Reply #5 on: June 30, 2013, 04:55 »
+1


1. The Skrill official website is  www.Skrill.com and any other URL should be considered false.



Funny. Even skrill.com re-directs to moneybookers.com once I'm logged in.

Ron

« Reply #6 on: June 30, 2013, 04:58 »
-3
@ OP - To be frank, that sounds like a typical phishing email like all the others.

Phishing emails always:

* never address you by your name
* create a panic by saying something is wrong with your account
* set a deadline or something will happen
* ask you to click a link

To prevent becoming a victim:

* check the URL by hoovering over the link in the email. It will show the true URL
* never click a link in an email
* always login via your own trusted website
* delete the email (after forwarding it to the company - see below)

they also often contain hilarious spelling mistakes. like "hoovering", which is what my dogs do to food.   ;D
Please forgive me for being Dutch and impress me with your Dutch spelling skills.

lisafx

« Reply #7 on: June 30, 2013, 13:26 »
0
I've had 2 of those.  Sent the info to moneybookers.  They're aware of it and give details here http://www.moneybookers.com/ads/moneybookers-scam-information/phishing/
It was quite good but they didn't have my name, just the email address and I would never click on a link in an email, I always go to the actual site.

Does make me wonder if I should change my email address though.


I got the same thing and responded the same way.  It was better than most of them.  On the first reading through I didn't catch any spelling mistakes or other dead giveaways.  (reading a second time to my husband I did spot that they said 31th of May, rather than 31st).

I always respond just as Sharpshot did.  I would never sign in through a link in any e-mail.  I went to Skrill and didn't see any notice of account changes, so I forwarded the e-mail to them. 

But I'm glad you posted the warning, epixx, because this really was one of the most convincing phishing scams I've received. 

« Reply #8 on: July 01, 2013, 11:13 »
0
I got this one too, and it was very convincing, very nearly caught me out (and I'm very paranoid about these).
Worth noting that the domain name it tried to send me to was moneybookersi.com.

« Reply #9 on: February 18, 2014, 23:48 »
0
oooohhhh....


 

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