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Author Topic: "Cityscape" KW  (Read 681 times)

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« on: November 04, 2019, 02:39 »
0
Hi:

Non-native English speaker asking for help again.

When do you use the kw "cityscape"? In all your city captions? Just in the panoramic ones? Do you use the kw "landscape" for cities?

When you use the kw "city" do you add the kw "town" too? In Spanish the meaning of these words is different f.i. In Spain we use "city" for villages. When I upload a shot from a city I use to insert both, but maybe "city" is a better option.

Thank you for your answers.


« Reply #1 on: November 04, 2019, 04:37 »
0
Hi:

Non-native English speaker asking for help again.

When do you use the kw "cityscape"? In all your city captions? Just in the panoramic ones? Do you use the kw "landscape" for cities?

When you use the kw "city" do you add the kw "town" too? In Spanish the meaning of these words is different f.i. In Spain we use "city" for villages. When I upload a shot from a city I use to insert both, but maybe "city" is a better option.

Thank you for your answers.

Others may give you different feedback, because word usage can vary from place to place.

Personally, I don't shoot "cityscapes" so that term isn't part of my usual KW collection. But speaking in general for US English, I would only understand it to refer to major cities with impressive skylines. Not for small towns or minor cities.

A smaller place here would be called a town, village, hamlet, etc. Not a city.

I would not use "landscape" to describe anything other than rural, scenic, bucolic shots.

Hope this helps.

« Reply #2 on: November 04, 2019, 05:12 »
+1
Thank you Martha.
It helps.

« Reply #3 on: November 04, 2019, 09:38 »
0
Thank you Martha.
It helps.

I'm glad. Good luck! :)

« Reply #4 on: November 04, 2019, 11:15 »
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I had no idea what is the difference between city and town. City - bigger, town - smaller? In general yes but apparently in England a city is one that has a cathedral. Other parts of the world don't have cathedrals so we are guessing again. But it was interesting to know there was a criteria.

« Reply #5 on: November 04, 2019, 11:39 »
+1
I had no idea what is the difference between city and town. City - bigger, town - smaller? In general yes but apparently in England a city is one that has a cathedral. Other parts of the world don't have cathedrals so we are guessing again. But it was interesting to know there was a criteria.

Most likely one would keyword for American English, since they seem to be the bulk of the stock buying customers. Thus City - bigger, town - smaller.

« Reply #6 on: November 04, 2019, 15:24 »
+1
Hi:

Non-native English speaker asking for help again.

When do you use the kw "cityscape"? In all your city captions? Just in the panoramic ones? Do you use the kw "landscape" for cities?

When you use the kw "city" do you add the kw "town" too? In Spanish the meaning of these words is different f.i. In Spain we use "city" for villages. When I upload a shot from a city I use to insert both, but maybe "city" is a better option.

Thank you for your answers.

I usually employ them without thinking too much. City, cityscape and town, for any shot related to cities. Altought town is more related to small cities.

« Reply #7 on: November 04, 2019, 15:38 »
0
I'm doing the same.

« Reply #8 on: November 04, 2019, 19:05 »
0
Cityscape = skyscrapers. Towns = church steeples, no skyscrapers but maybe 5-10 floor buildings.


« Reply #9 on: November 04, 2019, 19:17 »
0
Thus City - bigger, town - smaller.

Exactly.

« Reply #10 on: November 04, 2019, 22:15 »
0
Regarding citiscape, the important thing is not whether it's a panorama or just a regular shot, but that you're taking in a wide view versus just a building or two. It also has to be mostly buildings, but doesn't have to be skyscrapers.

Looking at some shutterstock images (which I won't post links to, but do a cityscape search and look at new content), a photo of a bridge with masses of foreground river and what might be buildings in the distance under the bridge is a terrible use of the cityscape keyword. Likewise a closeup shot of a man standing on a balcony with some buildings in the background. Also a shot of a single building with a bit of sky top left.

Here are some very different types of city views, all (IMO) correctly labeled a cityscape

https://www.shutterstock.com/image-photo/dallas-texas-cityscape-blue-sky-sunset-635413172

https://www.shutterstock.com/image-photo/panoramic-autumn-view-amsterdam-city-famous-1272194422

https://www.shutterstock.com/image-photo/cityscape-panoramic-view-old-bridge-warm-1417390817

https://www.shutterstock.com/image-photo/panoramic-cityscape-view-old-quebec-city-1497654002

https://www.shutterstock.com/image-photo/scenic-nighttime-skyline-dubai-united-arab-1187022295

This one was keyworded skyline but is also a good cityscape example

https://www.shutterstock.com/image-photo/singapore-skyline-679600114



« Reply #11 on: November 05, 2019, 03:01 »
+1
Thank you for the explanation. It's the use that I thought correct.

Like a landscape but with a city.

ShadySue

« Reply #12 on: November 05, 2019, 09:09 »
0
I had no idea what is the difference between city and town. City - bigger, town - smaller? In general yes but apparently in England a city is one that has a cathedral. Other parts of the world don't have cathedrals so we are guessing again. But it was interesting to know there was a criteria.

Most likely one would keyword for American English, since they seem to be the bulk of the stock buying customers. Thus City - bigger, town - smaller.

Excedpt that in Florida at least some places were called Cities that I would hardly even call a village.

In Scotland there's an official list of seven 'cities' which has changed in the relatively recent past - and I bet very few people would get them all right! Not only that, in at least the area around Edinburgh, going 'tae the toon', refers to going into Edinburgh, and actually we might say, 'going into town' for going up to Glasgow. I generally write town for a Scottish city as well as city, but not vice versa.

« Reply #13 on: November 05, 2019, 09:21 »
0
In Spain we call "cities" to villages about 50000 people or more. Sometimes with less population.


 

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