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Author Topic: Iris stock- New startup company from India looking for all your feedbacks  (Read 3266 times)

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« on: October 21, 2016, 05:48 »
0
We have one of the largest collections of Indian food photos and have photographed more than 6000 types of food (over 25000 photographs) covering different cuisines for the past few years. All photographs available on the website have been shot in high-resolution medium format camera by our professional photographers and are owned by iris stock. Kindly visit our website newbielink:http://www.irisstock.com [nonactive] and looking forward for all your feedbacks.


« Reply #1 on: October 21, 2016, 05:56 »
+3
I guess if you were looking for illustrative images of Indian food, it would be a good place to look, although the site name doesn't tell you that.  Pages are slow to load, to the point where I was done looking after 3-4 pages.

That said, the majority of what I saw was just "drop and plop" on a white board from eye level.  Interesting food, not very interesting lighting or composition.  Many off center.  You're continually touting the "medium format camera" all over the site, but I'm not seeing any good use of that.

« Reply #2 on: October 21, 2016, 06:17 »
0
Dear Mr. Sean Locke,
Thank you for your comments.
Regards,
Naresh Kumar,
IRIS STOCK

« Reply #3 on: October 21, 2016, 06:59 »
0
I think the website is little buggy. I also do not see any images when I do a search.

« Reply #4 on: October 21, 2016, 07:13 »
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no images in search
no images when click on home page categories
no US dollar currency on payment plan


ShadySue

« Reply #5 on: October 21, 2016, 07:39 »
0
I guess if you were looking for illustrative images of Indian food, it would be a good place to look, although the site name doesn't tell you that.  Pages are slow to load, to the point where I was done looking after 3-4 pages.

That said, the majority of what I saw was just "drop and plop" on a white board from eye level.  Interesting food, not very interesting lighting or composition.  Many off center.  You're continually touting the "medium format camera" all over the site, but I'm not seeing any good use of that.

Strange, we must be seeing different things. I'm not seeing all that many white backgrounds, even allowing for most of what may be intended as white backgrounds being light grey. (Maybe that was intentional).
Certainly, I only clicked on one category 'South Indian' from the front page and it took over ten seconds to load.

« Reply #6 on: October 21, 2016, 07:53 »
0
I think the website is little buggy. I also do not see any images when I do a search.


Yeah, I had one of the categories where none of the images loaded.

Here's the white bg: http://irisstock.com/search.php?category=1&q=tandoori

alno

« Reply #7 on: October 21, 2016, 08:03 »
0
Video page is not working, small previews look very nice though.
I'm sure you've made some research on pricing but $30 for a single picture of a cake (standard license) is quite expensive for 2016 I guess. 

ShadySue

« Reply #8 on: October 21, 2016, 08:07 »
0
Video page is not working, small previews look very nice though.
I'm sure you've made some research on pricing but $30 for a single picture of a cake (standard license) is quite expensive for 2016 I guess.
I don't know: you can pay from $15 to $125 for an isolated-on-a lot-of-grey photo of a plastic car going through a doughnut on the cutsie-named site.
« Last Edit: October 21, 2016, 08:34 by ShadySue »

dpimborough

« Reply #9 on: October 21, 2016, 08:47 »
+2
Desserts is spelled wrong on the front page  ;D

« Reply #10 on: October 21, 2016, 09:07 »
0
Video page is not working, small previews look very nice though.
I'm sure you've made some research on pricing but $30 for a single picture of a cake (standard license) is quite expensive for 2016 I guess.
I don't know: you can pay from $15 to $125 for an isolated-on-a lot-of-grey photo of a plastic car going through a doughnut on the cutsie-named site.
yep you CAN pay a lot for almost anything whether any one does is different. I think the key question here is are these food pictures in a niche that people will seek out I don't do food in any depth so I don't know how specialist these are but I can imagine someone writing a book about indian food might go there. (In fact I might skim it myself to see anything I fancy). I can't honestly say I found the pics anymore than functional but if they do the job.....

« Reply #11 on: October 21, 2016, 09:47 »
0
Video page is not working, small previews look very nice though.
I'm sure you've made some research on pricing but $30 for a single picture of a cake (standard license) is quite expensive for 2016 I guess.
The question is though is it just any cake or a particularly special type of indian cake thats hard to find on the likes of SS.

alno

« Reply #12 on: October 21, 2016, 10:34 »
0
Video page is not working, small previews look very nice though.
I'm sure you've made some research on pricing but $30 for a single picture of a cake (standard license) is quite expensive for 2016 I guess.
The question is though is it just any cake or a particularly special type of indian cake thats hard to find on the likes of SS.


They are pretty much western mostly IMO. I'm not an expert though.
http://www.shutterstock.com/video/search/?autocomplete_id=&language=en&lang=en&search_source=&safesearch=1&version=llv1&searchterm=indian+dessert&site=videos

Still wondering about the purpose of such stock purchases. The photos of desserts are quite technical, neither generic nor artistic. Some fake good looking menu in a crowded one-visit-only touristic place?

« Reply #13 on: October 21, 2016, 12:33 »
0
books/blogs etc about india and its food I guess as well as menus. Whether that's a big enough market to support a photosite is the big question.

« Reply #14 on: October 21, 2016, 13:09 »
+2
We have one of the largest collections of Indian food photos ... All photographs available on the website have been shot in high-resolution medium format camera by our professional photographers and are owned by iris stock...looking forward for all your feedbacks.


You would know better than those of us who live elsewhere what sort of market there is for pictures of Indian food. There are many on other agency sites, but probably not as specialized and not as typically presented in India.

However, I'd drop anything about using medium format cameras - the sizes of the images offered are typical for a full frame 35mm DSLR and I doubt anyone would notice or care.

Some of the English on the site needs work -  "Photographs well composed for multi user end" on the bottom of the home page as an example. I have no idea what that could mean.

Looking at the images marked RM, I can't see why buyers would be willing to deal with the complexity of RM for isolated on white food shots, or shots that don't look any different from the RF photos on the same site. You have sister shots in a series that are a mix of RF and RM - that just makes no sense (search for bitter gourd, for example to see a series that's a mix of RM and RF).

Your pricing page for subscriptions doesn't have any details for Standard Licenses and the single item price doesn't match what's shown elsewhere (1,900 rupees for a large vs. 2,000)

Your search needs work. I was surprised to see no results for samosas but then tried the singular and got two pages. Leaving aside that most of the images showed multiple items why turn buyers away by hiding results?

The variation in backgrounds (white to gray and varying white balance) is really offputting.

Out of curiosity, why did you ask about the site here? You have wholly owned content and don't appear to be looking for contributors. This is mostly a site for contributors, not buyers...

ShadySue

« Reply #15 on: October 21, 2016, 13:25 »
0
Some of the English on the site needs work -  "Photographs well composed for multi user end" on the bottom of the home page as an example. I have no idea what that could mean.
Maybe "photographs are composed considering a variety of possible crops in their end use", which is still a bit awkward.

ShadySue

« Reply #16 on: October 21, 2016, 13:25 »
0
The variation in backgrounds (white to gray and varying white balance) is really offputting.
Seems to be a 'thang', Jo Ann (I'll SM).


« Reply #17 on: October 22, 2016, 09:07 »
+1
None of the images on that first page makes me want to eat Indian food.  Sorry.

JaenStock

  • Bad images can sell.
« Reply #18 on: October 22, 2016, 11:37 »
+1
GOOD_
1-Ok, are exclusive products and exclusive images can be more expensive. Is good images price portection.
...Dont think in microstock prices all time people...!!
2-. Specialized: yes, you look for inidan food and you found here easy with clear and simple pictures
3-. Is not bad that isolated images dont have 255 white.

BAD-

1-. Medium Format Cmera with capital letters is nothing for me as a possible buyer.
Megapixels are 18... deep of field or color tones or other thing of big sensor sizes can not be apreciated in this images.
I have the feeling that the photographer was expensive and justify saying that the photos were made with medium format camera.

2-. lack of artistic originality in the compositions.

« Reply #19 on: October 22, 2016, 16:50 »
+1
They are not very creative food shots. Lighting,setting etc...it looks very outdated, like it was shot in the 80s.

You might want to look at macrostock libraries of what modern food photography looks like today. Or just general photography options in lighting, textures, aperture, colours, there is a whole world of photography technique that is missing.

It would also be great to see images with people, on location, preparation of food, home cooking and eating with the family.

The vibe of the images is dull and flat, food images are supposed to be exciting, tasty, fresh, make you want to dive right in and want to eat it. Unfortunately I agree with others, these images dont make me want to order or eat this food.

Sorry for being so blunt.

I would also drop the reference to the medium format camera, the lack of photography skills, cant be compensated with gear. A good photographer can take much better images just with an iphone.

Have a look here, these people understand food:

http://www.stockfood.co.uk

« Reply #20 on: October 27, 2016, 13:03 »
+1
Only one thing is needed in a food photograph: make you hungry or provoke mouthwashing. Part of my job is with starred chef and this is what they want. I love Indian cuisine, but I didn't find in Iris any image so sexy to do that. About medium format: 0,01% of food picture customers needs to print giant size and file so large. I use twice a year my view camera with medium format back: one is for a customer, one just for me; and for the customer is not matter of pixels, but only of Depth of Field


 

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