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Author Topic: New to stock photography  (Read 5032 times)

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« on: December 21, 2007, 13:34 »
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Hi all

I have joined today so I am not sure I have posted this in the right section? Is not please will someone put it in the correct place.

I have joined some stock sites but have not submitted any of my photo because I have feeling I either won't be excepted or sell any.

What would be a good way to start, in other what sort of subjects? Any suggests would be greatly appreciated. Are there any good books out there on the subject?


« Reply #1 on: December 21, 2007, 13:55 »
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Most sites have a place where you can look at best sellers or popular images.  Take a look at them to get an idea of what sells best.  Also look through magazines to get ideas of images that could be used to sell things.  Good luck  :)

« Reply #2 on: December 21, 2007, 14:01 »
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There is also no harm in trying to upload a few of your images and see how they do.  if they don't sell, no harm done, if they aren't accepted - learn from your mistakes.

I would try dreamstime and fotolia for starters, as they do not require test images to get started and have allright sales.

PaulieWalnuts

  • On the Wrong Side of the Business
« Reply #3 on: December 21, 2007, 14:05 »
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In addition to what fotografer (EDIT: and leaf, our great host of this site) said http://www.microstockdiaries.com has a lot of good info.

The one thing I would do different if I was back to square one is to master learning the requirements for Istockphoto and Shutterstock first. Not only are they usually the highest earners for most people, they also have the toughest quality standards. If you can get in those two, you could get in the rest. If you start with the easiest sites to get into, you'll need to go back and redo your portfolio over and over again until it's good enough quality to get into IS and SS.

There's a lot to learn. A lot more than can be covered here.

« Last Edit: December 21, 2007, 14:25 by Nazdravie »

« Reply #4 on: December 21, 2007, 14:45 »
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The most important thing you have to do is recognize your mindset.

In order to be successful in stock photography you will need to create images that have a very distinct purpose or idea behind them. That idea can be anything, and can take any form. Some people like to make specimen shots of single items in a studio-like environment, others prefer to make images of people in more natural environments. A lot of beginners think that their pretty nature shots will sell well, but few do: although they're nice to look at, very few of these pictures contain a clear message, and broadcasting a message is what commercial photography is all about.

By thinking of photographs in terms of idea/purpose/message you will have taken the most difficult first step. The next steps - content and creativity - are much easier.

... good luck!

« Reply #5 on: December 21, 2007, 15:35 »
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Hi Kirsten!

What you put into an image is what you will get out of it.

You need to decide how committed you are to microstock and set reasonable expectations based on the time you are willing to put into it.

For many of the better sellers, you'll learn that research, planning, and workflow go a long way.

When viewing images pay attention to lighting and composition, as well as subject matter.

Like sharply said, think conceptually as well as literally. What message are you trying to convey; what subject matter, composition and lighting would be best to convey it?

Good luck!
-Steve

« Reply #6 on: December 21, 2007, 15:55 »
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Best of luck Kirsten.

As others said it's a kind of learning as you go along - getting to know what sells and what type of work the various agencies accept.

« Reply #7 on: September 11, 2008, 07:00 »
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Kirsten I sent you a personal message

« Reply #8 on: January 25, 2009, 09:30 »
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Don't even bother to send pictures of flowers, sunsets, your pets, unless they are really good and you're 100% sure that they'll sell. The reason is that they have tons of these images and you would just waste your time by uploading them.

« Reply #9 on: January 30, 2009, 12:46 »
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Hi Kirsten, I just started my journey into the world of Microstock a few weeks ago.
Of the big six, I've managed to get in at all but StockXpert, and had the most difficulty getting in at Istock.   My portfolio is really tiny at this point.  Hopefully it will grow.
I realise that I'll probably have to invest in some lights, and background if I want to get ahead.  I'm currently researching what a good starter kit would be. 
I'd love to know how it's going for you. 

tan510jomast

« Reply #10 on: January 30, 2009, 14:06 »
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ciao Kirsten, welcome to the wonderful world (well, almost) of micro stock.
StockXpert is an awesome site to belong. The reviewers are very reasonable, and their rejection reasons are helpful, not vague like some  ;) Pay attention to what the reviewers' reasons of rejections are, and correct those reasons, and resubmit.
Istock, well, it's a bit touch and go, no one really knows .  Other than, never send anything that SS approves to IS, and v.v.  And try to submit with as little post-processing for IS. forget about selective focus. get everything clean and sharp with DOF. or else, IS will reject. this much I can tell . but I am not much with IS, other than that. I hope the others here can help you with IS.
More than anything, participate here and ask questions. And enjoy. Chill and not get too serious with some answers you get here. Carry an extra second glass of ale
so you don't get too irate if you get someone who sounds a bit too heavy .
never come into this forum stone sobre, heh!heh!... just joking. ;)

shank_ali

« Reply #11 on: January 31, 2009, 02:20 »
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Hi all

I have joined today so I am not sure I have posted this in the right section? Is not please will someone put it in the correct place.

I have joined some stock sites but have not submitted any of my photo because I have feeling I either won't be excepted or sell any.

What would be a good way to start, in other what sort of subjects? Any suggests would be greatly appreciated. Are there any good books out there on the subject?
Your a bit late to the party,what kept ya..
Just look through some micro sites libraries at what sells and g/l.It's a cool feeling when you actually sell a photo but be warned when it happens a few times it get addictive. ;)

« Reply #12 on: January 31, 2009, 03:00 »
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Hi Kirsten, I have some radical advice for you. The secret to knowing what to shoot is to 'think like a designer'. All very well, but maybe you're not one. Well, that can be fixed. There's a wonderful institution on istock called the Steel Cage. Designers (and would be designers) engage in Photoshop battles. There's no better way to discover what designers want (and what the library has to offer) than to go hunting for the right image to complete your killer blow. It's also a great way to develop as a conceptual artist - not a bad thing for a stock photographer.

To engage in this pastime (art as blood sport, it has been called), if you're not yet a contributor to istock then you'll need to become a member anyway and purchase a few images (this will make you a bona fide buyer). Can't remember what the cheapest credit pack is but that's all you need to get started. Then, enable battles in your Control Panel, find an opponent, and you're off and running. Apart from getting to know the collection from a buyers perspective, the Photoshop skill you'll pick up as you go will be invaluable. You'll find the Steel Cage among the istock forums.

PS I spend most of my time in the cage these days instead of out taking photos, so this is a danger.
« Last Edit: January 31, 2009, 03:06 by averil »

« Reply #13 on: February 01, 2009, 00:59 »
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Never be scared to upload to them. Always review your images at 100% before uploading them to the agencies to make sure they are sharp and do not have artifacts, and etc..

Go to http://xposurepro.com/ and they have some great tips for microstock and he is very helpful.


 

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