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Author Topic: Canon 600d or nikon d3200  (Read 4717 times)

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« on: December 03, 2015, 17:20 »
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I want to get my first camera now so i need you help.
What would be better for microstock use and general use?
And what will work better with 50mm lens?

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« Reply #1 on: December 04, 2015, 04:31 »
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I would recommend to touch them, youll get a better feeling which one suits you.

D3200 has a pretty good sensor for that price

« Reply #2 on: December 04, 2015, 06:00 »
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doesn't really matter if it's the first camera

i would advice an hasselblad h5d

« Reply #3 on: December 04, 2015, 11:01 »
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Leave the feeling for a moment, i want to know which one of them suits better to microstock.
And the canon 600d + kit cost the same as the d3200 with kit because the black friday price

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« Reply #4 on: December 04, 2015, 12:29 »
+2
Leave the feeling for a moment, i want to know which one of them suits better to microstock.

I would say categorically without feeling that this question can't be answered. There are microstock images with countless types of cameras. It's often about the photographer suiting to microstock not the camera.

« Reply #5 on: December 04, 2015, 13:18 »
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Leave the feeling for a moment, i want to know which one of them suits better to microstock.

I would say categorically without feeling that this question can't be answered. There are microstock images with countless types of cameras. It's often about the photographer suiting to microstock not the camera.
Of course the photographer is the main key to good photos but i just want to know what will technicaly will do the job better if you suit to both cameras

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dk

« Reply #6 on: December 04, 2015, 14:03 »
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I don't know about Canon but if you decide to buy Nikon i would suggest looking at the 5000 series (d5000, d5200, d5300 etc) as it is better for stock compared to the 3000 series.

« Reply #7 on: December 04, 2015, 14:43 »
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I don't know about Canon but if you decide to buy Nikon i would suggest looking at the 5000 series (d5000, d5200, d5300 etc) as it is better for stock compared to the 3000 series.
Why?
The 5000 cost almost x2 and this money important for a good lens i think

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« Reply #8 on: December 05, 2015, 13:47 »
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Srry please

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« Reply #9 on: December 05, 2015, 13:53 »
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I want to get my first camera now so i need you help.
What would be better for microstock use and general use?
And what will work better with 50mm lens?

Sent from my GT-I9500 using Tapatalk

Nikon. And the Nikkor 50 mm 1.4 is perfect combination.

« Reply #10 on: December 06, 2015, 16:41 »
0
I want to get my first camera now so i need you help.
What would be better for microstock use and general use?
And what will work better with 50mm lens?

Sent from my GT-I9500 using Tapatalk

Nikon. And the Nikkor 50 mm 1.4 is perfect combination.
Is it much better than the 1.8?

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« Reply #11 on: December 07, 2015, 08:26 »
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I use Nikon D3200 with 35mm 1.8G Lens. It is perfect combination. I also bought some cheap filters for closeup. This is working great for me.  Earlier I had 50mm D lens which had issue of focusing. I still have that one but 35mm is very sharp lens. The images require very less work on post processing.

« Reply #12 on: December 09, 2015, 04:08 »
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technically there are no big differences and they will do the same job.

In order to choose better you may need to know which is your intent in the "image-making" in order to choose a camera. Ask yourself some questions that are not related to the camera itself

Will i shoot outdoor?
Will i shoot in the streets?
Will i use filters?
Will i use flashes?
Will i shoot studio?
Will i shoot outdoor set?
Will i shoot animals?
Will i make videos?
Will i make timelapses?

etc etc....

i've a Nikon System and come from a Leica-M system.... and if can go back i would probably would choose Canon probably as in general is more versatile system brand.
But you can't choose correctly if you try to compare just the cameras...this is why i in the previous post i ruderely wrote that "doesn't really matter" :)


« Reply #13 on: December 09, 2015, 14:04 »
+2
Between those two for a first camera, it really does not matter.  Honestly  there are no bad cameras today.  The demands of microstock are not high end gear wise.  Get a body that feels good in your hand a nice zoom and maybe a good 50mm.

Do not look only at canon nikon, they are the big players but unless you need exotic glass like 600mm f/4 other brands are just as good sometimes better.
Sony and fugi are worth a look and for bang for buck you cannot beat Pentax.  Look at their k--5IIs or the k-3.

« Reply #14 on: December 10, 2015, 22:14 »
+1
Learn photography, then if you are any good, think about doing stock.  Knowing lighting, composition, etc. will help you more than which dslr you buy.
« Last Edit: December 10, 2015, 22:18 by PixelBytes »

« Reply #15 on: December 11, 2015, 04:56 »
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They are both have only 1 cross type focus point.
Is it that bad?

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« Reply #16 on: December 20, 2015, 04:02 »
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Hello?

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« Reply #17 on: February 12, 2016, 09:37 »
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Both are good have a good focus point :D Buying a camera at first is definately thee difficult for everyone,But i will tell you to learn photography for buying a good camera or yourself ! 8) 8)

« Reply #18 on: February 12, 2016, 10:01 »
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Either camera would be fine for microstock, as would those from other manufacturers.  I have used the Canon digital rebels for years and they are fine for microstock - small, light weight and cheap.  Great travel cameras.  I don't have recent experience with Nikon but they are probably just as good as Canon and maybe better in some respects - I would try them both out before making a decision.  You won't be wrong whichever way you go.

A couple things to consider.  If you are using them in a studio, the Canons at that level don't have direct connections for external strobes so you will need to get an adaptor if you want to use something more powerful than a speedlight.  Also if you do video the Canon will only shoot a maximum of 30 fps - if you want to shoot at 60 fps for slow motion then they probably are not the best choice.  Canon lenses also often have a lot more CA than expected for the price.  That can be dealt with in post but is a nuisance.  Not sure how Nikon compares with those but the type of shooting you will do definitely will have an impact.  Of course if you are just starting you may not know what you will be shooting until you've done it a while, and by then you will want a new camera anyway.  I would try to keep costs down if you want to make any money in micriostock these days - that should be your first consideration.


 

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