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Author Topic: Help editing photos and what sells  (Read 15889 times)

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« Reply #25 on: February 16, 2010, 08:44 »
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Well then, my question is why do they leave us to guess what subjects they are needing more of...


Some sites actually tell you what they are looking for. You just need to surf around and spend some time looking. For instance, here's the page on istock:

http://www.istockphoto.com/tutorial_5.0_neededfiles.php


« Reply #26 on: February 16, 2010, 08:51 »
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^ great thanks I havn't been on that one yet

I hunted on SS but only found a guide on Yuris own site.

« Reply #27 on: February 16, 2010, 09:00 »
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Basically I've learned from all your very useful feedback, that stock probably isn't my game, I should probably either keep photog as a hobby, or find another way to make some pocket money from my pics..

Nothing wrong with that.  Good luck!

« Reply #28 on: February 16, 2010, 10:00 »
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well, I looked around and there were those types of subjects in the lightboxes, which I thought I could slip into. In the 10 I submitted they weren't all exactly like the above, I did put in a cross mixture - but I think as most replies have stated they are saturated with this type of subject matter.
Well actually landscapes, sunsets and architecture do sell, if the are either (a) landmarks/icons/famous or (b) exceptional.
Food shots offer and endless variety of composition, diversity and colors. Landmarks are limited in the world.

helix7

« Reply #29 on: February 16, 2010, 10:43 »
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...trained in graphic design etc etc, I know basic photo skills...

Do you know Illustrator? Maybe photo isn't your game, but being trained in graphic design (as I was) might lend to using Illustrator to get into creating stock graphics and illustrations.

But keep in mind, as Sean mentioned, don't put the cart before the horse. Get comfortable with creating great images before you bother even trying to sell them. Find your niche, your style, the type of image that works for you, and hone your skills.

ShadySue

« Reply #30 on: February 16, 2010, 12:19 »
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You'll get "second opinion" :-)
You won't make it with nice landscapes and meadows full of flowers. What product or service could be endorsed with it?

My question is why do stock controllers leave submitters guessing what subjects they are needing more of...and more likely getting it wrong, it would surely save everyone's time and resources if there as a bit more descriptive criteria.

If they said they wanted red spingleplonks, you'd get hundreds of them within a fortnight, so how would you be better off?

« Reply #31 on: February 16, 2010, 14:02 »
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If they said they wanted red spingleplonks, you'd get hundreds of them within a fortnight, so how would you be better off?

You need to have the first spingleplonk then.
You know what sells like crazy? Hands with 6 fingers!
  ;D
Nobody with a clear mind is going to tell his potential competitors what will sell best.

lisafx

« Reply #32 on: February 16, 2010, 14:11 »
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Do you know Illustrator? Maybe photo isn't your game, but being trained in graphic design (as I was) might lend to using Illustrator to get into creating stock graphics and illustrations.

But keep in mind, as Sean mentioned, don't put the cart before the horse. Get comfortable with creating great images before you bother even trying to sell them. Find your niche, your style, the type of image that works for you, and hone your skills.


Very, VERY good advice, both the honing your skills part and the doing illustrations part. 

If I had any artistic ability at all I would be doing illustrations.  Much less competition and higher returns (at IS at least)

« Reply #33 on: February 16, 2010, 14:52 »
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If they said they wanted red spingleplonks, you'd get hundreds of them within a fortnight, so how would you be better off?

You need to have the first spingleplonk then.
You know what sells like crazy? Hands with 6 fingers!
 ;D
Nobody with a clear mind is going to tell his potential competitors what will sell best.



is that stating the obvious?  I meant SOME sort of guideline would help, which a  "kind soul" advised earlier





« Last Edit: February 16, 2010, 15:00 by modster »

« Reply #34 on: February 16, 2010, 15:00 »
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is that stating the obvious?  I meant SOME sort of guideline would help, which an earlier "kind soul" advised earlier
What I mean is that most advise you'll read on blogs and stuff are just common sense things.
The vast majority of blogs about microstock is for trapping you unknowingly into their referrals. Those who can't shoot, blog. They won't tell you the real things. The best tactic to find out what sells best is go to the sites and check the best selling photos.
« Last Edit: February 16, 2010, 15:02 by FD-amateur »

« Reply #35 on: February 16, 2010, 15:01 »
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If I had any artistic ability at all I would be doing illustrations.  Much less competition and higher returns (at IS at least)

I've thought the same __ but I don't think I could handle the rejections if I'd spent hours working on my 'masterpieces'.

A few years back I had a very talented illustrator in my CN on IS. His stuff outsold my photos by at least 4x relative to portfolio size but even so he had about a 60% rejection rate (against my own 15%). He'd also go ballistic when they kept deciding his vectors were only worth 1 credit rather than 3 at the time. He gave up in frustration but I'm sure if he hadn't he'd be making a very good living from it.

« Reply #36 on: February 16, 2010, 15:56 »
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Those who can't shoot, blog.

ROFLMAO! You made my day, Flemish.

ETA: What happened to the title? dot? what's that mean?  :)
« Last Edit: February 16, 2010, 16:03 by cclapper »

« Reply #37 on: February 16, 2010, 16:09 »
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the original post was changed to include nothing... .. which makes the subject of the thread nothing :( 

I changed the title of the original post so the thread had a title again.

« Reply #38 on: February 16, 2010, 16:31 »
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Oh...looks like the OP got discouraged. I must say one must have a tough skin to be in microstock. sjlocke, you know who you are.  ;) just teasin. Most of the time you crack me up...until your ire is pointed at me, then my feelings get hurt.  :)

I would love to see a picture of a spingleplonk.

donding

  • Think before you speak
« Reply #39 on: February 16, 2010, 16:32 »
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What happened??? Did Modster remove his original post?? Maybe he gave up on what sells and what doesn't. I know anyone thinking about getting into the stock business needs to sit around here and read these post for about a week ....then make up their mind rather it's worth all the aggravation

« Reply #40 on: February 16, 2010, 18:09 »
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yeah i dunno.  It looks like he took the advice he got well... but that doesn't explain the deleted first post?!  ???

ShadySue

« Reply #41 on: February 16, 2010, 18:47 »
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(deleted)
« Last Edit: February 17, 2010, 18:08 by ShadySue »


« Reply #42 on: February 16, 2010, 21:41 »
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I also am a graphic designer and I think that experience helped tremendously with my photography. For many years I had to buy stock photos to use in newsletters, catalogs, ads, etc. so when it came time for me to shoot, I had a better understanding of what I, as a buyer, was looking for.

I will buy your book when it comes out.  :)

« Reply #43 on: February 17, 2010, 05:13 »
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Those who can't shoot, blog.

ROFLMAO! You made my day, Flemish.

Many people will hate me for it.  ;)

This is not a nice forum nor a social club but if the OP can't stand the heat, he should stay out of the kitchen. He got some very sound advice for free. I have to temper my statement about blogging. It was about microstock business sites (with the exception of a few, like Lee), not about tutorial sites. Those are great.

As to a spingleplonk, I had the rare occasion to photograph one. It looks like the hand of Attila the reviewer, it grows on Lucky Olivers and it opens up only in moonless nights near the equator.
  8)

« Reply #44 on: February 17, 2010, 12:19 »
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This is not a nice forum nor a social club ...

Why not? Why shouldn't it be?

If I give a guy a few pointers, am I afraid he's going to submit 10,000 killer images next week and wipe out my sales?


« Reply #45 on: February 17, 2010, 13:23 »
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If I give a guy a few pointers, am I afraid he's going to submit 10,000 killer images next week and wipe out my sales?
But he actually got some very good pointers. His initial shots were landscapes, and since landscapes and landmarks are amongst my best sellers, my advice was honest and complete imho:
Quote
Well actually landscapes, sunsets and architecture do sell, if they are either (a) landmarks/icons/famous or (b) exceptional.
What would he expect? We give our shoot list and concepts away for the coming months? Gaps in the concepts present online we found with a lot of research and we plan to shoot later? I don't know of anybody here doing that.
Did he expect shoulder-tapping like on Flickr? If he can't deal with some realities here, how would he be stress-resistant enough to deal with rejections when he starts uploading?

I'm going to stay out of this kind of threads if it just generates frustration.
« Last Edit: February 17, 2010, 13:28 by FD-amateur »

« Reply #46 on: February 17, 2010, 14:32 »
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my advice was honest and complete imho:

Sure it was.  I'm just questioning your statement that this isn't a 'nice' forum.  Why shouldn't it be?  It's not a forum for cardiac surgeons. There's nothing serious at stake here.   
 

RacePhoto

« Reply #47 on: February 23, 2010, 23:40 »
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If they said they wanted red spingleplonks, you'd get hundreds of them within a fortnight, so how would you be better off?


Darn all I have is a shot of a green one...  ;)



Since the OP has fled the scene, I would have said shoot what you enjoy and find pleasure in creating, the sales will follow. If not at least you had a good time?

If this was all about starting out and making money, that's a whole different topic than "what sells". They are not necessarily the same thing.

Maybe it would be easier when the next person comes up with the same question, to give examples of what not to shoot, which will save them time and wasted effort? Even then, some stuff that doesn't sell, will sell.

« Reply #48 on: February 24, 2010, 08:12 »
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Hey Race,

Is that a picture of a Hodag from Rhinelander, Wisconsin?

RacePhoto

« Reply #49 on: February 24, 2010, 12:44 »
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Hey Race,

Is that a picture of a Hodag from Rhinelander, Wisconsin?

Of course, a Wisconson-ite would know that. :D Especially a Packer Fan!


 

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