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Author Topic: Selling 3D Animations  (Read 9680 times)

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« Reply #25 on: September 27, 2020, 06:51 »
0
videohive.net u can set u r own prices, i am selling more animations then shutterstock,adobestock or pond5

Do you keep your prices relatively similar to Shutterstock and Adobe's pricing? Or do you sell them for a lot lower? It seems like most stock footage on Videohive is being sold for a lot less.

Dang you were right about videohive. I've been on there less than a week and already made 6 sales with only around 70 videos. Way better than any stock agency, at least for 3d renders.

I am happy for u  :D ...(as an ex) finished one 2 days ago and today bang 83 $, nice.

What prices do you usually target on Videohive (1080p and/or 4K)?


SpaceStockFootage

  • Space, Sci-Fi and Astronomy Related Stock Footage

« Reply #26 on: September 27, 2020, 19:30 »
0
Mine are set at $19 for HD and $39 for 4K. Those are single use licenses though... for the multi-use license I go with $79 and $159.

« Reply #27 on: September 28, 2020, 10:32 »
+1
I have a question, i'm new user in Cinema 4D, Could i use free textures for my models and sell the renders of models on microstock? Sorry for my bad english. I speak spanish.
« Last Edit: September 28, 2020, 10:52 by alexandersr »

« Reply #28 on: September 28, 2020, 12:26 »
+2
I have a question, i'm new user in Cinema 4D, Could i use free textures for my models and sell the renders of models on microstock? Sorry for my bad english. I speak spanish.

Hi Alexander,
i think that you must own the copyright of all elements you use in your renders (3d models and textures).
Maybe there are websites that allow you to use the textures for microstock, but i'm not sure about this.
Personally i use only textures created by me (procedurally or from my shots).
If you use C4D i think that's fine to use the texture library that come with the software.

« Reply #29 on: September 28, 2020, 12:50 »
+1
I have a question, i'm new user in Cinema 4D, Could i use free textures for my models and sell the renders of models on microstock? Sorry for my bad english. I speak spanish.

Hi Alexander,
i think that you must own the copyright of all elements you use in your renders (3d models and textures).
Maybe there are websites that allow you to use the textures for microstock, but i'm not sure about this.
Personally i use only textures created by me (procedurally or from my shots).
If you use C4D i think that's fine to use the texture library that come with the software.
Thanks!
I create my own models, and use textures from C4D.
« Last Edit: September 28, 2020, 13:04 by alexandersr »

« Reply #30 on: September 29, 2020, 09:07 »
+1

i think that you must own the copyright of all elements you use in your renders (3d models and textures).
Maybe there are websites that allow you to use the textures for microstock, but i'm not sure about this.
Personally i use only textures created by me (procedurally or from my shots).
If you use C4D i think that's fine to use the texture library that come with the software.

Can you provide the law where that is written? i am kind of curious. The way you put it, it seems that people cannot even take a shoot of an ikea chair (which have design)  or any other object in the world. I don't see people in movies own the copyright of all objects like sofas tv and so on that they buy for the film clip shoot. And i see a LOT of this objects being used in microstock clips.
Furthermore I can advance that there is no such thing in EU law that i am aware of it.



 

SpaceStockFootage

  • Space, Sci-Fi and Astronomy Related Stock Footage

« Reply #31 on: September 29, 2020, 11:05 »
+1

i think that you must own the copyright of all elements you use in your renders (3d models and textures).
Maybe there are websites that allow you to use the textures for microstock, but i'm not sure about this.
Personally i use only textures created by me (procedurally or from my shots).
If you use C4D i think that's fine to use the texture library that come with the software.

Can you provide the law where that is written? i am kind of curious. The way you put it, it seems that people cannot even take a shoot of an ikea chair (which have design)  or any other object in the world. I don't see people in movies own the copyright of all objects like sofas tv and so on that they buy for the film clip shoot. And i see a LOT of this objects being used in microstock clips.
Furthermore I can advance that there is no such thing in EU law that i am aware of it.

It's usually less about 'the law' and more about the terms of the sites in question... plus copyright law. i.e there's not really any law that says you can't do 'x' when it comes to your use of a texture/model, but there are license terms, and doing something with the item that isn't allowed means you've breached the terms of the license, so you don't have the right to use it. If you don't have the right to use something, it's then an issue of copyright law.

For example, the terms of TurboSquid:

Quote
You may NOT publish or distribute Creations of Imagery through another stock media clearinghouse, for example as part of an online marketplace for photography, clip art, or design templates.

So unless you've created your models and textures from scratch, you need to check the terms of service to see what is and what isn't allowed.

That's for models and textures... when it comes to household objects, products, logos etc, they're usually all covered by some form of copyright protection, and what's allowed will vary considerably on the item in question, how prominently it features in the shot, end usage etc etc... plus how stringently the stock site wants to apply those rules when accepting content.   

 

« Reply #32 on: September 29, 2020, 11:35 »
+1

i think that you must own the copyright of all elements you use in your renders (3d models and textures).
Maybe there are websites that allow you to use the textures for microstock, but i'm not sure about this.
Personally i use only textures created by me (procedurally or from my shots).
If you use C4D i think that's fine to use the texture library that come with the software.

Can you provide the law where that is written? i am kind of curious. The way you put it, it seems that people cannot even take a shoot of an ikea chair (which have design)  or any other object in the world. I don't see people in movies own the copyright of all objects like sofas tv and so on that they buy for the film clip shoot. And i see a LOT of this objects being used in microstock clips.
Furthermore I can advance that there is no such thing in EU law that i am aware of it.

It's usually less about 'the law' and more about the terms of the sites in question... plus copyright law. i.e there's not really any law that says you can't do 'x' when it comes to your use of a texture/model, but there are license terms, and doing something with the item that isn't allowed means you've breached the terms of the license, so you don't have the right to use it. If you don't have the right to use something, it's then an issue of copyright law.

For example, the terms of TurboSquid:

Quote
You may NOT publish or distribute Creations of Imagery through another stock media clearinghouse, for example as part of an online marketplace for photography, clip art, or design templates.

So unless you've created your models and textures from scratch, you need to check the terms of service to see what is and what isn't allowed.

That's for models and textures... when it comes to household objects, products, logos etc, they're usually all covered by some form of copyright protection, and what's allowed will vary considerably on the item in question, how prominently it features in the shot, end usage etc etc... plus how stringently the stock site wants to apply those rules when accepting content.

That means that if I want to recreate a furnished room, the furniture designs must be unique, not similar to those of IKEA, for example?
Would I have to create models that are different for example from those of IKEA?
« Last Edit: September 29, 2020, 11:58 by alexandersr »

« Reply #33 on: September 29, 2020, 12:07 »
+1
Can you provide the law where that is written? i am kind of curious. The way you put it, it seems that people cannot even take a shoot of an ikea chair (which have design)  or any other object in the world. I don't see people in movies own the copyright of all objects like sofas tv and so on that they buy for the film clip shoot. And i see a LOT of this objects being used in microstock clips.
Furthermore I can advance that there is no such thing in EU law that i am aware of it.

Hi
SpacestockFootage has explained well what i meant.
I'haven't the law but if i remember correctly i've read it in the terms of Shutterstock

« Reply #34 on: September 29, 2020, 15:34 »
+1
A -texture- is a piece of copyrighted work.  A chair does not necessarily have any protection (like a design patent) and nobody will care unless it is recognizable as -art-.

« Reply #35 on: September 30, 2020, 04:01 »
+1
hi, thks spacestockf, motion and sean for explaining it.
About tbsquid and selling 3d models does it wort it? 
Selling stock footage it is already a headache to me so I never tried to sell my models.
i always though it was a little bit of wasting time. probably i'm wrong. 

« Reply #36 on: October 01, 2020, 17:50 »
0
The question seems a bit silly, but if I wanted to recreate a scene from space, or something in which I must use a spaceship, could not I use one of the NASA videos? Would copyright be violated if it is used in a composition?

SpaceStockFootage

  • Space, Sci-Fi and Astronomy Related Stock Footage

« Reply #37 on: October 01, 2020, 22:53 »
+1
Imagery from NASA is public domain, although they do request that you add a disclaimer along the lines of 'contains imagery furnished by NASA' when using their content. Also, anything that contains logos or recognizable people can't be used commercially.

I remember listening to a podcast back in the day, and the head of media (or some similar title) at NASA was being interviewed... and he was specifically asked if people could sell NASA content as stock footage and stock images, and he said that it's absolutely fine.

It's still up to the agencies whether they accept it or not but most do as far as I'm aware.

« Reply #38 on: October 26, 2020, 21:10 »
0
Imagery from NASA is public domain, although they do request that you add a disclaimer along the lines of 'contains imagery furnished by NASA' when using their content. Also, anything that contains logos or recognizable people can't be used commercially.

I remember listening to a podcast back in the day, and the head of media (or some similar title) at NASA was being interviewed... and he was specifically asked if people could sell NASA content as stock footage and stock images, and he said that it's absolutely fine.

It's still up to the agencies whether they accept it or not but most do as far as I'm aware.
Thanks for the information, i didn't know that, and well many more things about the use of images to make composites.

Look at this article on Dreamstime blog.
https://www.dreamstime.com/blog/composite-images-new-secret-to-success-stock-photography-51072
« Last Edit: October 28, 2020, 09:29 by alexandersr »


 

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