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Author Topic: Total Beginner! =)  (Read 4226 times)

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« on: September 10, 2008, 13:36 »
0
Hello to the photography world!

I'm taking this up as a hobby and just need a little information and thought I'd ask here! Hopefully you can help me out.

I was taking some photos and enjoyed the feeling but my hardware isn't so great when I compare it to what's out there. I've attached a sample photo that I think is one of the better ones I have taken. With only minor levels adjustments in my editing software I resized it for upload here. Hopefully quality doesn't deteriorate. Critique would be nice but I understand there's another forum for that; however I still post it for another reason also.

Right now I use a Konica Minolta Digital Camera. Pretty crappy 3.2 Megapixel 5 year old thing that I thought i'd give a shot at taking some nice photos with. That's the camera I used to take the attached photo. Now I plan to purchase a Digital Rebel XSi DSLR camera and have a basic question, will a better camera (even compared to my konica) give me better results in photos and thus better rates in the stock photo world? Will the upgrade of hardware be a key in helping me perform better out there? I assume it's true, but just opinions and a comment on the attachment would be nice =).

P.S- The attached picture is resized from 1852x1262.

Thank you very much and excuse the n00bness, just started reading about all this about a week ago and haven't let go since =).
« Last Edit: September 10, 2008, 13:38 by ahassam »


vonkara

« Reply #1 on: September 10, 2008, 15:20 »
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Yes you are making a great investment by buying the rebel, it will be a good camera to start I think. In stock you must understand that photoshop (or other software) is the key tool with your camera. For your image, make sure to have the sun in your back :)

« Reply #2 on: September 10, 2008, 16:44 »
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If you think about it one week already, and you posted in this forum, than I'm sure you will soon make few accounts on few stock sites. That's just the way I started. Your image is nice one, especially for a beginner. I am sure, soon, you will start making some really good images. My first images were similar to your image. From your post, looks like you are pretty serious person with nice attitude. It's not hard to get into all this, and it's very creative and inspiring...very interesting. I'm sure you can do it. I wish you good luck!
Ivan

« Reply #3 on: September 10, 2008, 16:52 »
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@whitechild

Thank you for the kind words. I am ambitious and really feel like I can get into this. I know when taking those pictures (like the one I attached) total form and lighting and photographic principles were not in my mind. I'd taken the picture on a trip with family and thought I'd try something different with depth-of-field.

Anyhoo; It's nice to have the encouragement so thank you again for that. I'm getting a good deal on the camera kit so hopefully if all goes well I'll be shooting in no time.

How long was it before your pictures began earning you even a tiny bit of money? Putting it into the correct categories and popular areas along with skillful and arful work helps I assume?

« Reply #4 on: September 11, 2008, 03:30 »
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I earned my first cents one month after getting into this. But one of my referrals sold one image the second day after image acceptance. and after it, he sold two images one week after acceptance.

« Reply #5 on: September 11, 2008, 06:56 »
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ahassam, I sent you a personal message

« Reply #6 on: September 11, 2008, 09:56 »
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I started off selling stock with the exact same camera, and when I upgraded to my Nikon D70, the difference in quality was astounding.  Now I wonder how those early photos could ever have been accepted.  They never would be accepted today.

« Reply #7 on: September 11, 2008, 11:10 »
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@Karimala
Are you saying that with the XSi, I wouldn't get the quality good enough to have success with stock photography? Should I be looking to a more expensive/pro camera?

« Reply #8 on: September 11, 2008, 13:40 »
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I guess Karimala was talking about your current camera.

Feel confident that with any DSLR on the market today, the only reason which may prevent you from reaching the necessary quality is... you  ;D





« Reply #9 on: September 11, 2008, 13:48 »
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The thing about cameras is that unless you start with the best pro equipment, most developing shooters will outgrow these serious/advanced amateur cameras in a year or two anyway.

One thing that concerns me right now is that full frame sensors will likely become the norm and my everyday lens ($1500) is DX, (whew, the only one!).  It would be a shame if you invested in good digital format lenses and had to buy new lenses as well when you get your next camera.

« Reply #10 on: September 11, 2008, 15:44 »
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I was referring to the Minolta 3.2 mp camera.

« Reply #11 on: September 11, 2008, 17:53 »
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The thing about cameras is that unless you start with the best pro equipment, most developing shooters will outgrow these serious/advanced amateur cameras in a year or two anyway.

One thing that concerns me right now is that full frame sensors will likely become the norm and my everyday lens ($1500) is DX, (whew, the only one!).  It would be a shame if you invested in good digital format lenses and had to buy new lenses as well when you get your next camera.

This is the exact thing I don't want to have happen. As much as I would like to be cost efficient I would also like to have decent equipment to make some money. It's the tradeoff to keep saving and hope to have enough at some point for a nice dslr or go with the XSi and start saving again with the earnings from the stock photos I put up. Maybe my profits would help pay for a new camera / equipment?

jsnover

« Reply #12 on: September 11, 2008, 21:52 »
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Other than working on the non-camera issues (composition, choice of subjects, good post processing, etc.) the biggest thing I'd suggest is that you stay away from any of the lenses that are for the crop frame EOS cameras only (the EF-S series). Investments in good lenses will stick with you through multiple camera generations. Having seen for myself the difference that a good quality lens can make, I'm no longer tempted to go for the cheaper lenses any more.

Start out with the top tier agencies (look on the forums here for threads on this) and although they'll initially reject a lot of what you submit, you can learn so much from that and improve. The agencies that accept just about anything are doing neither you nor themselves any favors.

You'll be back in a few months to talk about inexpensive lighting solutions and then you should check out the Strobist blog for some great info http://strobist.blogspot.com/2006/03/lighting-101.html


 

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