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Author Topic: Nikon D610 - Dirty sensor  (Read 11508 times)

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Beppe Grillo

« on: February 05, 2014, 12:20 »
0
Is it possible to have a so dirty sensor after only one month and a half of use?
http://img691.imageshack.us/img691/3936/kfe6.jpg

I don't understand how this could have happened.
If I look photos taken 2 weeks ago (with very closed diaphragm) the sensor was still perfectly clean.

But last week and today I have used the camera outdoor with temperatures around -25 C
Can the cold, and the successive thermic shock when turning home have caused some problem?


« Reply #1 on: February 05, 2014, 12:28 »
0
Those d 600dreds.

Yes. I have olilspill on my sensor as well. Im with the d 600.
Its annoying.
My spills are developing and getting worse.
but it is only oil, and it can asily be removed. There are sensor cleaning kits out there, and I already have one, or 2. They come in packets.
I was on a d 200 and cleaned the sensore onc in a while, it is not so bad.
It will take an hour, and some reading, but it will be clean. Same with the d 600.
We are in the cleaning business.
I suppose the very low temperatures  your camera has been subjected to, has produced results quickly. Dont worry too much. Just read about cleaning.



« Reply #2 on: February 05, 2014, 12:29 »
0
  You can get it dirty in a second so time shouldn't be a factor...  :)

You can clearly see sensor dust so I deeply believe thats what it is...

But now days that's not a huge problem, try to blow that away sometime it works, if not buy sensor swabs and Eclipse cleaning fluid for your sensor and clean those spots alone. better to learn it now than spend fortune at service places...


Some lenses tend to pull more dirt , mostly zoom lenses and make sure to read tips on how to change lenses... when u do it in some conditions u cannot avoid dirt


« Reply #3 on: February 05, 2014, 12:33 »
0
Another thing just for security , make sure that when u enter inside from -25C u will get condensed water on the camera so or u use a vacuum bag or don't turn it on for a while if u don't want fried electronic

Beppe Grillo

« Reply #4 on: February 05, 2014, 12:54 »
0
Well, thank you, I feel a little more calm after reading you both. ;)

I am not afraid to clean the sensor, I did that so many times with the Sinarbacks, but with these backs it is really easy in fact and they have all the special tools provided with.

I never had to clean my other Nikons. After years of use my D300 has less spots than the D610 after 2 months.

I have tried to blow with my air-blower, with the only result to get more dust each time

I know the sensor swabs and Eclipse cleaning fluid, I was looking for that, but here in Ukraine I don't find it.
All what I have found is SC-5200 After Shake Sensor Cleaning Kit
http://www.flaghead.co.uk/pages/greenclean_old/greenclean-products.html
I will get it tomorrow.

The main problem that I have with dust is not with photo because it is always possible to clean in post production. The main problem is with video because it is almost impossible to remove these spots.

Another thing just for security , make sure that when u enter inside from -25C u will get condensed water on the camera so or u use a vacuum bag or don't turn it on for a while if u don't want fried electronic


I am afraid I did not do that
« Last Edit: February 05, 2014, 12:59 by Beppe Grillo »

« Reply #5 on: February 05, 2014, 14:28 »
0
Try in future, but thats sure no reason for sensor dirt , that can do something that gives stronger headache

« Reply #6 on: February 05, 2014, 21:23 »
+1
Is it possible to have a so dirty sensor after only one month and a half of use?
http://img691.imageshack.us/img691/3936/kfe6.jpg

I don't understand how this could have happened.
If I look photos taken 2 weeks ago (with very closed diaphragm) the sensor was still perfectly clean.

But last week and today I have used the camera outdoor with temperatures around -25 C
Can the cold, and the successive thermic shock when turning home have caused some problem?


The D600 series is a loser.  I had two of them (D600) that had such bad sensor dirt and OIL that the images were unusable at only 500 shutter clicks.  I took them into Nikon and they replaced the shutter boxes.  That didn't help.  When I picked up the D600's, I took them to Nikons parking lot and did some test shots to ensure the sensors were clean.  NOT. A GIANT oil spot formed after 3-4 shutter clicks.  I took them right back into Nikon who kept them and did some more work.  I ended up getting an email from Nikon corporate in NY telling me they couldn't find anything else wrong and the issue was closed.  I had to sell my two D600's for a GREAT LOSS on Ebay. They are pieces of SH*&T and I would dump them while you can. Nikon products have turned to SH&T overall. They are more concerned about satisfying the everyday consumer (who don't know better about sensor quality, cleanliness, etc.) and less on the pro side because general consumers are where the real money is. I also dumped both of my D800's because they couldn't fix the left spot focus issue and just denied it was a problem.  By the way, both the D800 & D600 problems WERE FINALLY ACKNOWLEDGED by Nikon. The D610 was supposed to take care of the sensor issue as it has a redesigned shutter box. 

I ended up with a few D7100's, which had significant focus problems.  When I got them the mirror was -20 when the acceptable range is +/- 7.  But the sensors after thousands of images and video are still very clean.

There used to be a time when I could walk into Nikon and speak directly with a technician but now you are no longer allowed to speak with anyone but a clerk. Customer service is no longer part of their value proposition.
« Last Edit: February 05, 2014, 21:28 by Mantis »

Beppe Grillo

« Reply #7 on: February 06, 2014, 02:11 »
0
Is it possible to have a so dirty sensor after only one month and a half of use?
http://img691.imageshack.us/img691/3936/kfe6.jpg

I don't understand how this could have happened.
If I look photos taken 2 weeks ago (with very closed diaphragm) the sensor was still perfectly clean.

But last week and today I have used the camera outdoor with temperatures around -25 C
Can the cold, and the successive thermic shock when turning home have caused some problem?


The D600 series is a loser.
[]
The D610 was supposed to take care of the sensor issue as it has a redesigned shutter box. 


Reading you I understand that you are very angry with Nikon.
Personally I had never such problems before (I begun to use Nikon in the seventies).
But as you say today companies (not only Nikon) are more interested to consumer market than to pro.
But today it is a general trend to produce always faster to sell new products faster.
You cannot imagine how many problems I had with the Sinar P3 shutter and with one of the backs always disconnecting without any reason (it is surely not a consumer equipment), and consider that their software (Sinar Capture Shop) is one of the most buggy I ever used and that the camera does not work without

I hope they really solve the D600 sensor issue They should have done it.
This evening I will get the cleaning kit, but I will wait tomorrow morning to clean the sensor because there is more light (and more calm) at home in the morning.

Stay connected ;)
« Last Edit: February 06, 2014, 02:14 by Beppe Grillo »

gillian vann

  • *Gillian*
« Reply #8 on: February 06, 2014, 02:21 »
0
I think in the race to be as crowd pleasing as Canon Nikon has released too many models too quickly.

« Reply #9 on: February 06, 2014, 09:46 »
0
I saw this article for new sensor cleaning tool, looks easier than the wet swabs.

http://petapixel.com/2014/02/03/sensor-gel-stick-safely-clean-sensor-like-service-center/] [url]http://petapixel.com/2014/02/03/sensor-gel-stick-safely-clean-sensor-like-service-center/ [/url]

Don't know if its just a ad or if it really works?

« Reply #10 on: February 06, 2014, 10:04 »
0
I think in the race to be as crowd pleasing as Canon Nikon has released too many models too quickly.

Totally agree. Get it right first instead of pile on more non functional models.

« Reply #11 on: February 06, 2014, 10:14 »
0
Im happy with my d 600, despite the sensor spots.
They are not so bad, allthough they are many and they are multiplying.
its no big deal to clean the sessor, i have done that many times with other cameras, because there is always dust out there in the field, when you hunt butterflies and shift between macro and wide angle all the time.
I have had all kind of sh**t in the camera, even small insects, though not on the sensor. But I have had woolen creatures of the size of bears on it.
They can be blown away, but snot and honey cannot, so thats where the moist pads come in handy.

There are many youtube videos on sensor cleaning, I use to watch one, then clean, then testshoot.

Beppe Grillo

« Reply #12 on: February 07, 2014, 03:54 »
0
Well, I did it!
Now the sensor is clean, not perfectly but a lot of cleaner than before.
The center of the sensor is perfectly clean.
Some spots stayed on the borders and most of them in the angles (they are the most difficult parts to access of course).

It is even cleaner some hours after I cleaned it than just after I cleaned it
If I follow this logic, in three or for days it will be perfectly clean  ;D

« Reply #13 on: February 07, 2014, 07:10 »
0
Well, I did it!
Now the sensor is clean, not perfectly but a lot of cleaner than before.
The center of the sensor is perfectly clean.
Some spots stayed on the borders and most of them in the angles (they are the most difficult parts to access of course).

It is even cleaner some hours after I cleaned it than just after I cleaned it
If I follow this logic, in three or for days it will be perfectly clean  ;D

If some of the spots are baked on oil then you will need to send in the camera for a cleaning. If you are shooting video, it makes the sensor hot and can act like cooking food in a skillet.

OM

« Reply #14 on: April 28, 2014, 18:35 »
0
Re. D600 sensor crap. I have a D600 but it doesn't seem to have a problem (not a big problem anyway). About one month ago I read that Nikon will now undertake to either fix your D600 or replace it with another D600 or D610 if your sensor crap problem keeps returning...even if the camera is outside its guarantee period.

See this link:

http://www.nikon.com/news/2014/0328_01.htm

« Reply #15 on: April 28, 2014, 20:37 »
0
Well, I did it!
Now the sensor is clean, not perfectly but a lot of cleaner than before.
The center of the sensor is perfectly clean.
Some spots stayed on the borders and most of them in the angles (they are the most difficult parts to access of course).

It is even cleaner some hours after I cleaned it than just after I cleaned it
If I follow this logic, in three or for days it will be perfectly clean  ;D

Can you share your technique, the kit/materials that you used or the tutorial that you watched before attempting it? I've got 4 bodies that have never had their sensors cleaned.

Thanks!

Beppe Grillo

« Reply #16 on: April 28, 2014, 22:58 »
0
Can you share your technique, the kit/materials that you used or the tutorial that you watched before attempting it? I've got 4 bodies that have never had their sensors cleaned.

Thanks!


The used product (SC-5200 After Shake Sensor Cleaning Kit) is indicated in one of my previous post, and I just followed the instructions.
http://www.microstockgroup.com/21895/21895/msg364226/#msg364226

But in fact this product is not very good and a little too much expensive.

After that I have done some photos with my macro lens, with very closed diaphragm, I have noticed that I still have spots on the borders and in the corners of my sensor.
I have ordered products from http://www.visibledust.com (Green Swabs + Smear Away + Sensor Clean) - Everybody tells me that they are the best products ()
On the site you will find a lot of tutorials videos too.
« Last Edit: April 28, 2014, 23:02 by Beppe Grillo »

Phadrea

    This user is banned.
« Reply #17 on: February 29, 2016, 05:50 »
0
Well I only had my D750 a few weeks and already dirt on the sensor that shows on blue sky images. A real problem for video footage so what would be the best option (except sending to Nikon as they cocked up big time with my D200) ? I am a bit nervous of doingit myself with no experience.

« Reply #18 on: February 29, 2016, 10:36 »
0
Everyone has their own favourite method. I use a blower, a sticky bud "stick" for picking off the odd speck, and as a last resort, or if there was anything oily etc. (never happened with the Pentax K5 I'm using) pads and eclipse fluid.
Be careful of cheap blowers too. I had one I bought a while back that was putting in more crepe than it was removing. The Giotto that replaced it has been fine.

Chichikov

« Reply #19 on: February 29, 2016, 10:47 »
0
Visibledust product are good, but it is never easy to get a satisfying result with these cleaning kits.
Maybe you could find some specialized company to clean it.
But the easiest way that I have found to avoid dust spots on videos if to not close the diaphragm more than f/8
I know that it is not always possible, but if you can do it it works!

Phadrea

    This user is banned.
« Reply #20 on: March 01, 2016, 04:44 »
0
Visibledust product are good, but it is never easy to get a satisfying result with these cleaning kits.
Maybe you could find some specialized company to clean it.
But the easiest way that I have found to avoid dust spots on videos if to not close the diaphragm more than f/8
I know that it is not always possible, but if you can do it it works!

Thanks. Yes, the shots were of a distant industrial building on my 70-300 lens stopped down to at least f8. I will try and keep vide under that then for now at least.

I know this sounds a bit heath robinson but what about the sensor upside down with mirror up and a vacuum cleaner pipe an inch or so away while using a dust blower. The vacuum would make sure no dust returns ?

Chichikov

« Reply #21 on: March 01, 2016, 12:46 »
0
Visibledust product are good, but it is never easy to get a satisfying result with these cleaning kits.
Maybe you could find some specialized company to clean it.
But the easiest way that I have found to avoid dust spots on videos if to not close the diaphragm more than f/8
I know that it is not always possible, but if you can do it it works!

Thanks. Yes, the shots were of a distant industrial building on my 70-300 lens stopped down to at least f8. I will try and keep vide under that then for now at least.

I know this sounds a bit heath robinson but what about the sensor upside down with mirror up and a vacuum cleaner pipe an inch or so away while using a dust blower. The vacuum would make sure no dust returns ?

It is very important is that you don't touch the sensor with the dust blower and/or the vacuum cleaner.
But generally some spots are sticked to the sensor and the only way to remove them is to use a swab with a special (solvent / antistatic) product.

« Reply #22 on: June 24, 2016, 13:02 »
+1
I had a D600 and got rid of it before Nikon made their offer to repair/replace. Oh well, I have a D610 now and it's a different beast in that the new shutter mechanism is no more prone to throw oil than any other. It stays as clean as my Df. I don't know what some of you expect. The sensor of all interchangeable lens cameras will get dirty sooner or later. If it's dirty, clean it!


 

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