pancakes

MicrostockGroup Sponsors


Author Topic: Break News From Wisconsin  (Read 1715 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Uncle Pete

  • Great Place by a Great Lake - My Home Port
« on: June 19, 2019, 07:59 »
+5
I'm from Wisconsin, home of, Colby cheese (yes named after the city), Spotted Cow beer, sold only in WI and of course a variety of cheese factories and artisan cheese makers. Kind of like craft beer has taken off, craft cheese is running through a popular phase.

"The shocking news comes from a study conducted at Canadas McMaster University, in which the cheese-eating habits of a whopping 130,000, 35-70 year-olds, representing a staggering 21 countries were examined. Believe it or not, the research shows that participants who consumed a substantial amount of the yellow stuffabout two servings every dayexperienced a decreased level of stroke and heart disease.

Whats interesting, though, is that those who abstained from indulging in cheeseor other dairy products for that matterexperienced a higher rate of mortality, to the tune of 44.4%. Talk about shocking!"


https://tiphero.com/eat-cheese-for-a-long-life

And no this isn't one of those, like the Onion or others, humor sites that post real sounding news. It's a real study. Make mine aged Blue Cheese with veins and spots, high cream level. Nothing more enjoyable than a cheese that's aged in a cave and smells like... well anyway.

Who'd have thought that a dairy product was good for anything except baby cows?




« Reply #1 on: June 19, 2019, 09:22 »
+1
Hey, Pete, thanks for sharing this excellent news!

I'm another old timer who loves cheese and has eaten my weight in it (or more) over the course of my life. Maybe that explains why my ol' heart is still so good and my non-addled brain just keeps on keeping on.

See ya' over at the cheese barrel!  ;D
« Last Edit: June 19, 2019, 12:09 by marthamarks »

« Reply #2 on: June 19, 2019, 10:02 »
+1
My currently favorite cheese is from Pag Island in Croatia, where they make it from sheep milk which eats very salty grass (that island is in the middle of the sea and is mostly made from rocks) and it makes such an interesting cheese. But it is priced very high too...

dpimborough

« Reply #3 on: June 19, 2019, 10:37 »
+1
Madison is a lovely city to visit :D

I was elated to see they had a cheese shop selling cheese hats the last time I went :D

« Reply #4 on: June 19, 2019, 10:58 »
0
Love those fried cheese curds!

k_t_g

  • Happy Thanks Giving!
« Reply #5 on: June 19, 2019, 15:30 »
0
I think what is an OK amount to consume is different for each of us. We don't all fit the same mold. These studies are OK as a starter point and not the silver bullet of guide lines.

« Reply #6 on: June 19, 2019, 16:20 »
0
I think what is an OK amount to consume is different for each of us. We don't all fit the same mold. These studies are OK as a starter point and not the silver bullet of guide lines.

Most of us know that, I think.

« Reply #7 on: June 20, 2019, 05:05 »
0
One eating habit helps but not enough and for everything.

As my signature states.
Greek (Mediterranean) eating habits and materials also help.

Google "Icaria island of longevity"

:)

« Reply #8 on: June 20, 2019, 09:44 »
+2
As another person who was born and bred behind the cheddar curtain, this study is good news!

« Reply #9 on: June 20, 2019, 14:21 »
+1
This is truly awesome news.
Tomorrow I fly from NC to Minneapolis, then onward to WI for the Ellsworth Cheese Curd festival where there will be 20+ cheese curd dishes.
For me fried curds are the way to go.  ;D

« Reply #10 on: June 20, 2019, 17:32 »
0
This is truly awesome news.
Tomorrow I fly from NC to Minneapolis, then onward to WI for the Ellsworth Cheese Curd festival where there will be 20+ cheese curd dishes.
For me fried curds are the way to go.  ;D


My brother and sister-in-law and I went to Oshkosh a couple of years ago for the EAA air show. I ate fried cheese curds every day. They are the best!


« Reply #11 on: June 21, 2019, 16:08 »
0
except... the study is kind of useless - because it is discounting thing like say........

"city slickers" that sit on their butt all day, and farmers who are actually working in the field day in, day out...
could be excercise... could be lack of pollution compared to say NYC/L.A... could be more natural foods, could be many other things...

but taking one item - and isolating it to the exclusion of everything else is like saying since all astronauts drink water, drinking water makes will make you an astronaut...

« Reply #12 on: June 21, 2019, 16:11 »
0
except... the study is kind of useless - because it is discounting thing like say........

"city slickers" that sit on their butt all day, and farmers who are actually working in the field day in, day out...
could be excercise... could be lack of pollution compared to say NYC/L.A... could be more natural foods, could be many other things...

but taking one item - and isolating it to the exclusion of everything else is like saying since all astronauts drink water, drinking water makes will make you an astronaut...


Ummmm. Did you actually read any of this piece?

"The cheese-eating habits of a whopping 130,000, 35-70 year-olds, representing a staggering 21 countries were examined"

Sorry, but that doesn't sound to me like a study that "took one item and isolated it to the exclusion of everything else."

« Reply #13 on: June 21, 2019, 16:29 »
0
nope, actually I didn't read that...

still then - there are so many other variables at play, and so easy to manipulate statistics to prove the point you want.

like saying 9 out of 10 dentists recommend ______. you pick then 9 dentists you want to 'prove' your point, and then 1 you don't to make it seem legitimate.

a lot of farmers are also subsidized (gov't intervention/food control/etc) - and so if they have a surplus of cheese (which most likely they do), its in their best interest to commission a report that "proves" you "need" cheese.

same way, if pizza, pop & potato chips ever went out of style, I'm sure numerous "reports" and "studies" would pop up "proving" that a steady diet of pizza, pop & potato chips was detrimental to your health, because you were lacking "electrolytes" (salt), "protein" (the meat), etc, etc.

« Reply #14 on: June 21, 2019, 16:33 »
0
except... the study is kind of useless - because it is discounting thing like say........

"city slickers" that sit on their butt all day, and farmers who are actually working in the field day in, day out...
could be excercise... could be lack of pollution compared to say NYC/L.A... could be more natural foods, could be many other things...

but taking one item - and isolating it to the exclusion of everything else is like saying since all astronauts drink water, drinking water makes will make you an astronaut...


Ummmm. Did you actually read any of this piece?

"The cheese-eating habits of a whopping 130,000, 35-70 year-olds, representing a staggering 21 countries were examined"

Sorry, but that doesn't sound to me like a study that "took one item and isolated it to the exclusion of everything else."

pps, i.e., does that mean the 1 BILLION chinese people, and the 1 BILLION east indians, and half a BILLION arabs, who don't have a steady cheese diet, are at "44.4%" higher risk of those diseases? (somehow, they seem to be doing pretty well on the diet they do have)...

« Reply #15 on: June 22, 2019, 08:02 »
0
except... the study is kind of useless - because it is discounting thing like say........

"city slickers" that sit on their butt all day, and farmers who are actually working in the field day in, day out...
could be excercise... could be lack of pollution compared to say NYC/L.A... could be more natural foods, could be many other things...

but taking one item - and isolating it to the exclusion of everything else is like saying since all astronauts drink water, drinking water makes will make you an astronaut...


Ummmm. Did you actually read any of this piece?

"The cheese-eating habits of a whopping 130,000, 35-70 year-olds, representing a staggering 21 countries were examined"

Sorry, but that doesn't sound to me like a study that "took one item and isolated it to the exclusion of everything else."

pps, i.e., does that mean the 1 BILLION chinese people, and the 1 BILLION east indians, and half a BILLION arabs, who don't have a steady cheese diet, are at "44.4%" higher risk of those diseases? (somehow, they seem to be doing pretty well on the diet they do have)...

I'm not trying to prolong this off-topic conversation any further than it already has gone, but

A bit of quick research on "full-fat dairy" turned up this relevant information:

Consuming dairy may not help not only with diabetes management, but also with preventing the development of the disease. Data from the Nurses Health Study II appeared in an article published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition that suggested diets rich in dairy may have a protective effect against the development of type 2 diabetes. High dairy intake is associated with a lower incidence of type 2 diabetes, especially when started at an early age of adolescence, explains Smithson. A review of research published in September 2017 in the journal Nutrients concluded that the consumption of dairy and dairy products offers protective benefits against type 2 diabetes.

As the research indicates, including dairy as part of a well-balanced diet can be beneficial at preventing and managing diabetes, but the question remains as to what type of dairy is the best choice. There is emerging research that full-fat dairy may have a protective effect on preventing type 2 diabetes, yet that research is not conclusive and does not necessarily apply once diabetes has already developed, explains Lori Zanini, RD, CDE, creator of For The Love of Diabetes, who is based in Los Angeles.

For those at risk of developing type 2 diabetes, consuming full-fat dairy warrants some consideration, especially when it comes to weight management. A study published in February 2016 in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition looked at the role of full-fat diary on weight management over the span of almost two decades. Women consuming more than 3.1 servings of full-fat dairy per day showed the lowest amount of weight gain.



Source: https://www.everydayhealth.com/type-2-diabetes/diet/guide-eating-dairy-with-diabetes/

« Reply #16 on: June 22, 2019, 09:01 »
+1
Love cheese. Lactose intolerant. I am doomed!   :-X

« Reply #17 on: June 22, 2019, 10:42 »
0
Love cheese. Lactose intolerant. I am doomed!   :-X

 :(

My hubby is lactose intolerant too. So I eat the yummy cheese while he eats his heart out.  :(

Uncle Pete

  • Great Place by a Great Lake - My Home Port
« Reply #18 on: June 22, 2019, 11:31 »
+1
I think what is an OK amount to consume is different for each of us. We don't all fit the same mold. These studies are OK as a starter point and not the silver bullet of guide lines.

With all these news stories, you are correct. Remember when it was a glass of wine a day? Hey the French cook everything in loads of butter. Chinese live longer because of the spices and low fat. They don't eat cheese...  ;D That has more to do with refrigeration, but wait, Georgian (Russian) live the longest or used to?  ::) Next week we will learn that coffee is great for us, and two weeks later how it's bad for us.

Sugar is bad, artificial sweeteners are bad = if it tastes good, spit it out!

I'm born and raised in Wisconsin, a Cheese Head, I'm lactose intolerant but cheese is no problem, just ice cream and milk. URP! I've never owned one of those stupid foam cheese heads. I have been to the National Cheese makers Convention as a guest of a cheese factory. Oh that was dreamy. Tasted the contest winning, awarded cheeses. Oh Wow. I'd love to get a media pass to that? (see always thinking stock aren't we?)  :)

By the way, working in Iowa last weekend, they had a new M&M Flavor, Hazelnut Spread, which is obviously an allusion to Nutella. Pretty good. Not appearing in WI yet, but the marketing people said nation wide roll out?

=
« Last Edit: June 24, 2019, 18:01 by Uncle Pete »

« Reply #19 on: June 22, 2019, 13:00 »
0
Love cheese. Lactose intolerant. I am doomed!   :-X

there is already lactose-free cheese available...

« Reply #20 on: June 22, 2019, 13:52 »
0
Love cheese. Lactose intolerant. I am doomed!   :-X

there is already lactose-free cheese available...

Yes, and also pills to help people tolerate lactose.

My hubby won't consume either. His loss.

« Reply #21 on: June 22, 2019, 22:22 »
+1
Love cheese. Lactose intolerant. I am doomed!   :-X

there is already lactose-free cheese available...

Yes, and also pills to help people tolerate lactose.

My hubby won't consume either. His loss.

Definitely his loss - lactase pills are cheap, readily available and they really work.

« Reply #22 on: June 22, 2019, 22:35 »
0
Love cheese. Lactose intolerant. I am doomed!   :-X

there is already lactose-free cheese available...

Yes, and also pills to help people tolerate lactose.

My hubby won't consume either. His loss.

Definitely his loss - lactase pills are cheap, readily available and they really work.

Thanks for that. I'll share your message with him and ahem try to convince him to be, ya'know, kinda, sorta, a wee bit less stubborn.  :D

« Reply #23 on: June 23, 2019, 23:23 »
+1
Love cheese. Lactose intolerant. I am doomed!   :-X

 :(

My hubby is lactose intolerant too. So I eat the yummy cheese while he eats his heart out.  :(

lactose intolerants should be able to eat any aged cheese as there's no longer any lactose!

"This is because lactose is primarily in the whey, not the curds. When cheese is being made (with the exception of some soft cheeses that contain whey, like ricotta) the whey (liquid) is discarded and the lactose goes with it."  from the google

Uncle Pete

  • Great Place by a Great Lake - My Home Port
« Reply #24 on: June 24, 2019, 01:22 »
+1
Love cheese. Lactose intolerant. I am doomed!   :-X

 :(

My hubby is lactose intolerant too. So I eat the yummy cheese while he eats his heart out.  :(

lactose intolerants should be able to eat any aged cheese as there's no longer any lactose!

"This is because lactose is primarily in the whey, not the curds. When cheese is being made (with the exception of some soft cheeses that contain whey, like ricotta) the whey (liquid) is discarded and the lactose goes with it."  from the google

Thanks I should have looked. I always wondered why I could eat cheese and have no ill effects but a glass of milk or rich ice cream will have adverse effects.

Lovely blue cheese, yummy mold.  :)



Although another favorite is smoked provolone.
« Last Edit: June 24, 2019, 18:03 by Uncle Pete »


 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
0 Replies
1473 Views
Last post August 13, 2008, 11:30
by News Feed
23 Replies
6697 Views
Last post June 15, 2009, 13:08
by pieman
45 Replies
9775 Views
Last post June 30, 2012, 19:08
by oxman
24 Replies
3949 Views
Last post April 23, 2014, 14:55
by Cesar
24 Replies
7179 Views
Last post April 10, 2015, 11:02
by etudiante_rapide

Sponsors

Microstock Poll Results