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Author Topic: Business idea, what to do?  (Read 8027 times)

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« Reply #25 on: March 21, 2007, 18:29 »
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It would be interesting that the involvement in this group might bring up a business association.  :)

One point I think would need discussion: what kind of business model are you thinking of?  Macro, micro, both?  Each member setting his own prices?

One important thing mentioned by Bateleur: image quality inspection.  This is very important but might be a source of conflicts...

Regards,
Adelaide


« Reply #26 on: March 22, 2007, 01:59 »
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One important thing mentioned by Bateleur: image quality inspection.  This is very important but might be a source of conflicts...


Thanks for picking up and enlarging on that, Adelaide. In any venture of this sort it would be important to keep the quality high. Buyers don't want to wade through a load of rubbish. They'll go elsewhere, and they're spoiled for choice nowadays.

But, with a cooperative venture, who's going to be the judge of quality? It could indeed be a source of conflict. Maybe there would have to be some sort of voting system. But that could be horribly unwieldy with thousands of images ... oh boy!

« Reply #27 on: March 22, 2007, 03:30 »
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added -> madeliad, berryspun, latex, lizard, le_cyclope.

Hope i didn't miss anyone.

« Reply #28 on: March 22, 2007, 04:40 »
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One point I think would need discussion: what kind of business model are you thinking of?  Macro, micro, both?  Each member setting his own prices?

One important thing mentioned by Bateleur: image quality inspection.  This is very important but might be a source of conflicts...
Other questions that will have to be considered are:

-who keeps the books (ie, looks after and tracks the money)
-who looks after the IT (who pays for this and the start up costs, running costs until profitable)
-how will you correspond (assuming you aren't all in the same location,timezone, meetings could be difficult - Coops are enormally localised)

The other thing that would be considered is how is this going to differ from featurepics which already offers 70%.  Are all costs etc going to be less than 30% or revenue?

« Reply #29 on: March 22, 2007, 09:36 »
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well there have been a number of good ideas about your questions CJ but we would never divulge them to the prying eye.  :D

On the other hand - are you saying you want in on the discussion?

« Reply #30 on: March 22, 2007, 09:42 »
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On the other hand - are you saying you want in on the discussion?
I spend far too much time on here already. :o :o

« Reply #31 on: March 22, 2007, 10:07 »
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awwwwhhh commmmonnnn.. you know you wannn to!!  ;)

« Reply #32 on: March 22, 2007, 10:14 »
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  I'd be interested in being involved in this discussion.  My perspective is going to be a little different than most people here.  I've only recently started messing around in the micro stock area, and I'm not really that good at it yet.  My background is in IT, primarily database design and programming and thick client programming (programs that get installed on the actual computer).  It's been years since I've programmed a web page and I know that's all changed.  Just that database aspects of something like this could be very involved.
  Lucky Oliver and Fotolia are the only two sites I've gotten accounts on and LO is the one I've been concentrating one, figure we're both new at this and I really like their informal feel.
  newbielink:http://www.luckyoliver.com/portfolio/Allen+Stoner [nonactive]

Allen

« Reply #33 on: March 22, 2007, 10:58 »
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Let me know if you'd like me part of your discussion...I'm sure I could help you get a sense of your costs and time.

« Reply #34 on: March 22, 2007, 13:17 »
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I'm game, let's go!

« Reply #35 on: March 22, 2007, 17:32 »
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My idea is not to create competition for micro sites because they are our bread and butter.

But recently I went into a poster shop and a guy showed me a book of poster photos they get from an Australian photo lab.

HOW ABOUT THIS!

We come up with a series of photos we all think will sell as posters etc. Then we approach a professional photo lab in our area about getting a deal done where they provide the printing. Then we approach these poster shops about selling the images and setting them up with books etc.

It would have to work like a 30-40-30% deal I think. Basically we provide the images to the lab, the retailer makes orders over the phone. the lab prints them and sends them out.

It would be our responsibility to approach the retailers.

What you guys think?

« Reply #36 on: March 25, 2007, 05:15 »
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One important thing mentioned by Bateleur: image quality inspection.  This is very important but might be a source of conflicts...


Thanks for picking up and enlarging on that, Adelaide. In any venture of this sort it would be important to keep the quality high. Buyers don't want to wade through a load of rubbish. They'll go elsewhere, and they're spoiled for choice nowadays.

But, with a cooperative venture, who's going to be the judge of quality? It could indeed be a source of conflict. Maybe there would have to be some sort of voting system. But that could be horribly unwieldy with thousands of images ... oh boy!

Hi all,

I'm new to this site so maybe I'm not as qualified as some of you guys, but this is such an interesting subject....I couldnt resist to say my opinion. ::)

Coming to the point, I believe Madelaide and Batelour are right. Inspection is by far one of the main concerns and in a way it could be really annoying for a photographer to see an image being refused by his own colleagues, whether its an association or a cooperative society.

So, my idea is to let the market judge instead of inspectors. Just think: how many of you guys have images in your portfolio that did very well on some agencies but havent been even accepted on some other sites?
Further, if you could have your own website, which photos would you publish and sell? your whole portfolio or just the cream?
I think that the key to attract buyers to a new place, which certainly shouldnt be a "clone" of some istock or shutterstock, is to offer them the highest standard of quality in the market.
How to do it? Well, in the very first stage, let contributors upload only their best selling images (i.e. images that had a number of sales in a certain period among one or more agencies).
This would help to fill the box with great contents. Customers would save time as they would not go through hundreds of snapshots. In the meanwhile, you wouldnt need inspectors as others have already done the dirty work for you.
In the next stage, i.e. when you got a decent market share and money comes, you can build up a well paid inspector team (not only made by photographers but designers too, which most of the times have a different approach and a very critical eye on what is worthy or not). This would definitely help you to fill the gap between you and traditional microstocks, as you can now deal with fresh ideas without first waiting to see how they do with your competitors.

Clearly, the bad side of this story is:
-Slower growth compared with other agencies (at least in the first stage, but who cares as long as quality is high?);
-Barriers to entry: not all photographers may qualify, or some of them may have just a little bunch of photographs to upload;
-Photographers should work with some other agencies as well (again, who cares? everybody here knows that exclusivity doesnt pay in the microstock system)

Then, the next step would be price structure...buyers shouldnt spend more money than they already do for an image and photographers should earn more. BUT HERE WE NEED A MIRACLE!!! :-\

Hey, I wrote a lot!! maybe some of you felt sleeping in the meanwhile.oooops!
Best everything,
Diego

« Reply #37 on: March 27, 2007, 00:40 »
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Hey guys I've heard from a few of you...just wondering if your interested in my help :)

Building off Diego's ideas-

This might be strange, but I'll throw it out there-the photos only play 1/3 into the equation (sorry guys, but i'm also a photographer too!)  Another 1/3 goes into the story your trying to tell.  Some people call this brand, I prefer to call this a story. Online it's slightly different than a traditional product brand.  The last 1/3 goes into your marketing/technology strategy.

You need to find people that excel in each of these groups.

« Reply #38 on: March 27, 2007, 10:38 »
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Hey Bryan.

sorry for taking a while to get back to you.  I took a vote of those brainstorming for the microstock coop and the consensus was that - although we value your help and opinions very much, you would also, eventually, be the competition (to some extent - despite the fact that the buyer market is pretty large and diverse).  So to keep our top secret earth shattering ideas for ourselves ;) we thought it best to confer with you outside of the actual 'coop brainstorming area'


« Reply #39 on: March 27, 2007, 10:41 »
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Hey guys I've heard from a few of you...just wondering if your interested in my help :)

Building off Diego's ideas-

This might be strange, but I'll throw it out there-the photos only play 1/3 into the equation (sorry guys, but i'm also a photographer too!)  Another 1/3 goes into the story your trying to tell.  Some people call this brand, I prefer to call this a story. Online it's slightly different than a traditional product brand.  The last 1/3 goes into your marketing/technology strategy.

You need to find people that excel in each of these groups.

yeah, when you say that, i think i would agree... and see lucky oliver has done a good job of this.  Branding, i have learned in the past is quite popular and often overlooked.

In my opinion amoungst the microstock lucky oliver has done one of the best branding jobs.  Others who stick in my mind are istock and perhaps dreamstime.  Bigstock, canstock, shutterstock, and the others i think i could easy get confused as to which was which if i had only been there once.

« Reply #40 on: March 27, 2007, 11:30 »
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Not a problem Leaf...feel free to ping me anytime. While strategy is important, most of it's execution.  Get the team focused- good things happen when there's a clear goal.  The details work themselves out!



« Reply #41 on: July 16, 2007, 01:03 »
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I might be a bit late but I would like to read your thoughts and contribute some of my own.  I have thought for a long time that a site run by photographers would be a good idea.


 

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