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Author Topic: Creative Arts And Youth  (Read 1747 times)

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« on: November 16, 2006, 23:42 »
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The following was posted by Bryan in the Lucky Oliver blog, entitled "Creative Youth". I thought it might be of interest:

"I ran across some interesting statistics yesterday in a pamphlet put out by Project Cornerstone, and alliance of non profits in Santa Clara Valley (it's a county in California for all you Olivers- and yes Californians think the world revolves around them :). The group surveyed 14,000 young people in the county to find out how many had certain assets from 40 statements. These included topics such as support, empowerment, boundaries, values, learning, etc. The questions were given to two groups: 4th-6th graders and middle & high schoolers.

Two statements that struck me the most were:

1. Creative Activities- Young person spends three or more hours per week in lessons or practice in music, theater, or other arts.

2. Community Values Youth- Young person perceives that adults in the community value youth.

23% of middle & high schoolers found Creative Activities to be true and 18% found Community Values Youth to be true. These were the two lowest scoring statements in the entire survey. These statements were also in the highest category of drop off from 4th-6th graders. The 4th-6th graders were at 63% for Creative Activities and 35% for Community Values Youth (still very low).

Wow. I couldn't help but think that LuckyOliver has a talented group of designers, illustrators and photographers with the potential to make a huge difference for our youth. We're a community that values sharing and creativity. As role models and parents, how are we getting this wrong? I grew up with a paint brush in one hand, a camera in the other and parents that gave me lots of opportunities to explore my creative identity. I was pretty lucky.

If you have a chance, go on a photo expedition with your child. Get finger paints and have a blast. If youre a pro, give a class to your community center. Got an old camera? Donate it to your local youth photography club. Small things like this can have a big impact...it just takes a little effort. Why? I've found that by opening up part of your creativity, you always tend to get back more...and who couldn't use more inspiration for their work?"


 

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