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Author Topic: Spend your life doing what you love  (Read 8223 times)

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« Reply #25 on: October 12, 2012, 14:45 »
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If you work for money or wealth or income, you get into a cycle of never having enough and always wanting more money and therefore miss the enjoyment of living. It becomes just as bad of an addiction as drugs. Money won't make you happy, but neither will poverty.

Happiness comes from inside!
So true.  I read somewhere that if you are a happy person and win the lottery you will be a rich happy person but if you are a miserable person and win the lottery you will be a rich miserable person.


rubyroo

« Reply #26 on: October 12, 2012, 15:03 »
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Sorry Racephoto - I didn't mean to insult the sciences at all, and I do appreciate that creativity and science are not necessarily mutually exclusive (a very close relative has a BA in fine arts and a Masters in Computer Science, and he blends everything together incredibly well).  It's just that there are some kids who really struggle dreadfully with science, maths etc., and only really flourish in the arts.  I just hate it when we get governments who belittle artistic subjects and try to push all kids into sciences (for the benefit of the economy, and with no regard for that person's true talent and potential).  In some cases this will really limit that person's future.  I don't mean to suggest that any one subject is better than other... nor that challenges aren't important.  I just think that, whilst a square peg might benefit from acquainting itself with a round hole, it shouldn't be shoved into one.

I totally agree that happiness is an inside job  :)

lisafx

« Reply #27 on: October 12, 2012, 16:33 »
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If you work for money or wealth or income, you get into a cycle of never having enough and always wanting more money and therefore miss the enjoyment of living. It becomes just as bad of an addiction as drugs. Money won't make you happy, but neither will poverty.

Happiness comes from inside!
So true.  I read somewhere that if you are a happy person and win the lottery you will be a rich happy person but if you are a miserable person and win the lottery you will be a rich miserable person.

Not to mention that if you don't have a good head for money, you will not be a rich person very long.  Always reading about people who won the lottery and are broke/bankrupt 5 or 10 years later. 

« Reply #28 on: October 12, 2012, 16:57 »
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[I think you need to be a little more open minded. I happen to like the sciences, and went into college to study physics and chemistry because I enjoyed it so much. I ended up doing other things, but did archaeology work for a local museum, as a volunteer, because I like it so much. Interesting concept, paying to work for free?  :)

And consider this, if they executed every archaeologist and, geologist and anthropologist, tomorrow, the next graduating class would fill all the positions. There's no shortage. These people ARE creative and imaginative. They love what they are doing, just as much as any artist who's creating things from their mind.

The reason there's no "good income" for most artists, writers, poets and photographers (and musicians I might as well add) is the same. Too many good people and the way up is long and hard no matter what field you choose.

There's often far more jobs in fields that interest you than might expect.

I was surprised to read a report recently that archaeologists in the UK were struggling to find work in the economic downturn because much less development work and road building was going on. Examining what the excavations for building work uncovered was a major source of work for them. So how many archaeologists do you think there are working in the UK? 100? 500? The number is actually 7000 according to that report.

« Reply #29 on: October 12, 2012, 17:05 »
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It would also take more than a few years to replace all the geologists employed in the oil and minerals industry not to mention environmental and construction.

I do think the number of geologists, archaeologists, anthropologists, linguists, etc. doing academic research is relatively small though.

Obviously someone has to do a number of jobs that few people are going to want to - when they require low skills that usually isn't a problem, but when they require a lot of skills or training that usually means they have to pay well.

Money really only makes a big difference when you don't have enough. Still, I agree that most people would do well to think about how much time and effort they are spending to make money to buy things they don't need or things that are supposed to save them time.  If you live simply and cheaply you are much more likely to be able to spend more time doing what you love and less time trying to make money.

« Reply #30 on: October 12, 2012, 18:04 »
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Obviously taking the comment "do only what you like" to the extreme isn't going to work if everybody does it.

I think the idea behind it is not to chase more money working in jobs you don't like when you could do one you like and still survive and be happier overall. 8-10 hours a day of a job you don't like isn't compensated by a shiny car or bigger house etc.

How do you make a small fortune ? Give someone a large one.

« Reply #31 on: October 12, 2012, 23:16 »
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I remember watching an episode of "Undercover Boss."  One of the guys who trained the undercover CEO of a waste management company cleaned out portable toilets for a living.  He spoke from the heart and said he absolutely loved his job, because having a clean toilet makes people happy, and making people happy is what he's all about, no matter how disgusting the job.  Just an awesome guy...singing on the job, smiling all day long, out there making people happy while cleaning toilets. 

« Reply #32 on: October 13, 2012, 10:45 »
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If what you loved stayed static it would be less of a problem. I think most people don't know what they like, especially when young. A basic education is good start and important foundation for whatever you do.

The trouble with making your passion your vocation is it often becomes just another job.

RacePhoto

« Reply #33 on: October 16, 2012, 10:51 »
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Sorry Racephoto - I didn't mean to insult the sciences at all, and I do appreciate that creativity and science are not necessarily mutually exclusive (a very close relative has a BA in fine arts and a Masters in Computer Science, and he blends everything together incredibly well).  It's just that there are some kids who really struggle dreadfully with science, maths etc., and only really flourish in the arts.  I just hate it when we get governments who belittle artistic subjects and try to push all kids into sciences (for the benefit of the economy, and with no regard for that person's true talent and potential).  In some cases this will really limit that person's future.  I don't mean to suggest that any one subject is better than other... nor that challenges aren't important.  I just think that, whilst a square peg might benefit from acquainting itself with a round hole, it shouldn't be shoved into one.

I totally agree that happiness is an inside job  :)


I really hate it when artists look down on scientists for being to regulated, regimented and stagnant. (and yes that's a stab at humor...)  :D

Everything is what you make of it. I've never had a job because I look forward to whatever I do, and sometimes I get paid for it!

Here's the funny part. I like Microstock for the challenge and trying to create shots that sell, not for the money. Look at who the most unhappy people are here, on a day to day basis? The ones driven by profit and income, and who are constantly watching downloads and pennies. Does that sound like art or the path to internal happiness?

Someone (smart and successful at Micro) way back when they "recruited" me into Microstock said, "It's not art." and they were 100% correct.

No I didn't take anything personally, just that the common assumption is that somehow art and science are polar opposites. (science and religion have the same issues)

Think about it, the often mentioned Ansel Adams was looking at photography in a very scientific and creative way. People who develop their own secret formulas for pottery glaze (and they have some very interesting ones) have protected these like state secrets. Classical painters didn't run down to the store for a tube of cerulean blue, they mixed them, themselves. This is all science. Vanishing point, golden mean or color wheels?

No it's not math, trig. and all that cyphering. But there are some fairly consistent composition rules and guidelines that can be defined and analyzed scientifically.

Interesting read related to the perceived polarization. http://www.forumonpublicpolicy.com/archive07/jaccard.pdf

My theory is since everything is vibrating and those molecules are running around in elliptical orbits, planets the same, repeating patterns and everything... the Universe is one big note. I'm starting the Church of Universal Harmony which will be based on "The Big Note".


tab62

« Reply #34 on: October 16, 2012, 10:58 »
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all good points! There are two sides to the money issues- 1. Make More 2. Spend Less  Most folks only think of the first rule but if you don't have any debts (Credit card, student loans, car payment) getting by is a lot easier thus enjoying your life more. I have lost many night's sleep in my past life worrying on how I am going to pay the bills this month. I only buy things out of 'Need' not 'Want' these days thus the 9K camera will have to wait for many years...

rubyroo

« Reply #35 on: October 16, 2012, 11:08 »
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No arguments from me Race, I totally agree with you.  I always loved the story (IIRC) that Einstein came up with his Theory of Relativity while lying on his back on a grassy hill, imagining a ride on a lightbeam.  :)

@ tab62.  Totally agree.  No debts here either.  Immune to advertising.  Used to buy everything under the sun, but these days I really love living a simpler, less cluttered life.  Just don't go in the props room... ;)

_________________________________________
Edited to remove more info than I intended to share...
« Last Edit: October 16, 2012, 11:39 by rubyroo »

tab62

« Reply #36 on: October 16, 2012, 11:54 »
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Yeah, I stay out of my favorite camera store here as well! Every time I go there I tell myself, "Get only what you need" and I end up with a truck full of goodies! The same with my computer- I could easily upgrade yearly but I have found that added additional storage space and system RAM usually does the trick for me....


 

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