MicrostockGroup Sponsors


Author Topic: Spend your life doing what you love  (Read 8194 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

« on: October 11, 2012, 02:56 »
+1
Here's a fun inspirational video which I think makes a lot of good points.
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&amp;v=siu6JYqOZ0g" target="_blank" class="aeva_link bbc_link new_win">http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&amp;v=siu6JYqOZ0g</a>
!


rubyroo

« Reply #1 on: October 11, 2012, 04:55 »
+1
Thanks Leaf, this reminded me how lucky I am now to spend my energies doing something I love, and what a terrible waste of two decades I spent contorting myself to fit value systems that were completely out of kilter with my heart and spirit. 

I wish the education system spent more energy trying to get to the heart of a kid's true talents and developing those, rather than being orchestrated by government policy to force creative, imaginative kids into sciences etc. to benefit the economy.  As the man suggests, if people are actually doing what they love, they will have more energy for it, spend more time on it and do it for much longer, probably with better health too!  Governments are so bloody short-sighted and narrow of thought <grumble>

Poverty would make such a simple idea impossible for many, but if the schools were differently-focused... it could be a possibility for all. 

Microbius

« Reply #2 on: October 11, 2012, 05:28 »
0
I don't really know what to think about that video. I would have agreed 100% with it in my mid teens.

I can't help but feel quite uncomfortable with the self centered individualism of spiel like this now, it seems a little base and ugly. Almost like we have swung far too much in that direction and people don't need to be told to be even more selfish and self entitled.

Think about how many young graduates leave University thinking they are entitled to be given a job they enjoy doing in their chosen field.

There were a few in my year that thought it was fine to sit around drawing benefits waiting for a graduate position and complaining that they were sending out loads of CVs but not being given a job. While some of us were literally cleaning toilets or walking up and down motorways pulling weeds because we didn't feel we had the God given right to the job we enjoyed doing, but were better off working doing anything for a living then sponging off others.

More so now I am older and have a family it isn't really all about what I want and enjoy directly. I have duties and responsibilities, my greatest pleasure comes from knowing that I am providing for my family and my child's future.

« Reply #3 on: October 11, 2012, 05:33 »
0
It's a nice idea but a bit impractical.  I'm sure that nobody likes cleaning toilets etc so if we all did this none of the horrible jobs would ever be done.  Saying that I have always told my children get an education and then to go for something they will enjoy even if it earns them less money that something they would hate doing.

« Reply #4 on: October 11, 2012, 06:01 »
+1
The video simply says:

Choose a job you love, and you will never have to work a day in your life.
― Confucius

« Reply #5 on: October 11, 2012, 06:09 »
0
The video simply says:

Choose a job you love, and you will never have to work a day in your life.
― Confucius

That sums it up nicely. 

I feel society is in a blind race for money and it's easy to fall into the trap when really, it serves no purpose other than to provide for our needs.  There is no point in working simply to get money in the hopes of THEN enjoying life.  Enjoying life while you are working and you won't have to worry about earning enough to enjoy life.

That said, as a photographer, I feel I'm already retired (don't work) :)

« Reply #6 on: October 11, 2012, 07:09 »
0
A very warm and fuzzy video. Too bad the philosophy doesn't hold up in real life. If everyone did what they loved, nobody would clean our toilets. That's the reality and tragedy of life.

I am a full-time photographer. I generally love photography. But I still feel often dissappointed... why? That's because I have too much work and too little money and 90% of the jobs are boring repetition (the 10% is something interesting I LOVE doing, often they are also jobs that doesn't pay much.). So, how do I get rid of the 90% of work and still pay of the bills?

(I still wouldn't trade my job for a 9 to 5 job :))
« Last Edit: October 11, 2012, 07:13 by Perry »

« Reply #7 on: October 11, 2012, 07:15 »
+3
A better philosophy for most of the people would be to start loving the things that they are already doing. To find happiness in little things that already exist.

LSD72

  • My Bologna has a first name...
« Reply #8 on: October 11, 2012, 07:42 »
0
Sort of parallels the Rodenberry theory for Star Trek. People love what they do, a money system is abolished and people work for the advancement of humanity. Sounds utopian and very nice.

« Reply #9 on: October 11, 2012, 08:13 »
+1
For what it is worth.

My story.  After graduating from University with a Science degree I made a sober decision on the future.  I made a vow to poverty and decided to live a life as an artist (painting).  That was 40 years ago and I will say that I have been successful on both accounts with no regrets. 

If you want to ask why I am doing Stock Photography I will only say that I am on Sabbatical . . . meaning . .  that the world changes and some people don't.

« Reply #10 on: October 11, 2012, 08:30 »
0
Sort of parallels the Rodenberry theory for Star Trek. People love what they do, a money system is abolished and people work for the advancement of humanity. Sounds utopian and very nice.
It will take a long time for humanity to understand that concept - unfortunately.

The Zeitgeist movies series explains that nicely.

I don't think it's utopian. It's just something pretty much impossible to realize when everyone around us is mended to the monetary system.

Everyone will ask you: Well how would I add a pool to my house and what if I wanted to drive a 2 million dollar car?

As long as money exists, the race for monetary competition will drive people into doing the stupidest things.

The term 'collective' is pretty much extinct in most peoples heads as our societies by now have suffered from so much prejudice, racism and the feeling of entitlement.

« Reply #11 on: October 11, 2012, 10:18 »
0
I bloody love Alan Watts, he's quite an inspiration.

velocicarpo

« Reply #12 on: October 11, 2012, 10:42 »
0
Great! Thanks for sharing!
As many I just love Alan Watts, one of the great spiritual/psychedelic thinkers of the last generation. I always enjoy the recordings of him while being on the plane/train/bus.

BTW: You can find lots of hourly long recordings of him as a podcast here: http://www.lorenzohagerty.com/blog/
Direct link to the feed: http://feeds.feedburner.com/matrixmasters/iGAG
(The Podcast contains much other stuff and trash tough, they always disclaim the last name of the main speaker in front of the episode title)

« Reply #13 on: October 11, 2012, 10:50 »
0
The book "Psychotherapy East & West" (1961) by Alan Watts was a must read back in the late 60's . . . .  and is still recommended.

« Reply #14 on: October 11, 2012, 12:47 »
0
I spent 30 years as an electronics and software engineer.  I liked the first 10 years, and hated the last 10.  Now I do photos, and make a few bucks, and it's fun.  Maybe I should have started in photography, but film was too daunting, too expensive to learn.   My point is, what you like - can change.
« Last Edit: October 11, 2012, 14:41 by stockastic »

Microbius

« Reply #15 on: October 12, 2012, 01:47 »
0
I was watching one of the documentaries in the Megacities series with Andrew Marr a while back.

There's a giant open sewer, I think it was in Mexico City, basically like a giant river of sh*t and toxic waste 30 odd feet wide. Every now and then the vents at the end of this river of sh*t get blocked. Often with the decaying body of say, a dog, or a victim of crime who has been dumped in the huge river of excrement. These vents are 50 feet down in the pitch black under a massive weight of sewerage. It is the job of this one guy to put on a diving suit, and go down 50 feet in the pitch black sh*t river and fish out unspeakable stuff from these holes and hope that a syringe doesn't puncture his suit causing him to die from some hideous disease.

This is an essential job, without this guy the waste system in the city would stop working. How long do you think we'd have to hold out to find someone who's passion it is to fish month old corpses from under a river of sh*t without material compensation?

« Reply #16 on: October 12, 2012, 02:33 »
0
I was watching one of the documentaries in the Megacities series with Andrew Marr a while back.

There's a giant open sewer, I think it was in Mexico City, basically like a giant river of sh*t and toxic waste 30 odd feet wide. Every now and then the vents at the end of this river of sh*t get blocked. Often with the decaying body of say, a dog, or a victim of crime who has been dumped in the huge river of excrement. These vents are 50 feet down in the pitch black under a massive weight of sewerage. It is the job of this one guy to put on a diving suit, and go down 50 feet in the pitch black sh*t river and fish out unspeakable stuff from these holes and hope that a syringe doesn't puncture his suit causing him to die from some hideous disease.

This is an essential job, without this guy the waste system in the city would stop working. How long do you think we'd have to hold out to find someone who's passion it is to fish month old corpses from under a river of sh*t without material compensation?

But if nobody does it, the ones who do what they love (Engineers), never would design the system like that, and cities would put something different in place (like a machine that cleans it) as a solution, which needs to be engineered. Therefore the engineers can keep doing what they love and the crap-diver can move on to better things

Microbius

« Reply #17 on: October 12, 2012, 03:01 »
0
......and that's why it is called Utopian

« Reply #18 on: October 12, 2012, 03:51 »
0
rewatching the video again.. i don't think it's saying we shouldn't do things we dont' want to do.. or won't ever have to do unpleasant things.  I feel it was saying decide what you really want to accomplish / do in life and work hard at working towards that goal even if the end results isn't being monetarily wealthy.  Pursuing a profession / lifestyle you enjoy is worth more than money can buy. 


« Reply #19 on: October 12, 2012, 05:13 »
+1
AS I recall, school careers advisers are there specifically to tell people that it is impossible to do what they would like to do because there aren't any jobs in it, so  you have to go and study to work in a shop or a laboratory or something. 

For six years I knew exactly what I wanted to do, then, when I was 16, I was told it was not possible and I had to do something "sensible" (to nods of parental approval), so I spent the next 35 years doing stuff that wasn't really right for me before managing to get at least partly back to what I had wanted when I was 15.

Still, it's an indulgence to do what you want, and if you don't work for money then when you eventually need money you may end up making people with less enjoyable lives pick up the bill - for example, if  you need expensive medical treatment. Is that fair and right?

To function, society must have people doing nasty, dull or repetitive jobs so either we all make a contribution to the general good or some of us live the life of Riley by making others do our share of the nasty stuff. Even if you only want to raise fluffy sheep in fields of green(which does contribute to the general good), a consequence of your lifestyle is that someone has to work in an abattoir - and if nobody will do that then you can't raise your lambs. To be a writer  you need printers or computer assembly lines to spread your wisdom and if you write with no interest in publishing, then you need other people to work to pay your bills.

« Reply #20 on: October 12, 2012, 05:55 »
0
To function, society must have people doing nasty, dull or repetitive jobs so either we all make a contribution to the general good or some of us live the life of Riley by making others do our share of the nasty stuff. Even if you only want to raise fluffy sheep in fields of green(which does contribute to the general good), a consequence of your lifestyle is that someone has to work in an abattoir - and if nobody will do that then you can't raise your lambs. To be a writer  you need printers or computer assembly lines to spread your wisdom and if you write with no interest in publishing, then you need other people to work to pay your bills.

^  +1
(That was my point, exactly)

« Reply #21 on: October 12, 2012, 06:05 »
+1
That's was Mr. BeHereNow.

It's been a while since I heard Alan Watts speak at U of Toronto 1972.
Wow that's 40 years ago and still basically doing what I did then.

« Reply #22 on: October 12, 2012, 06:55 »
0
That's was Mr. BeHereNow.

It's been a while since I heard Alan Watts speak at U of Toronto 1972.
Wow that's 40 years ago and still basically doing what I did then.

Be Here Now . . . . . .  the number one book in my life,  thanks for bringing it up.

velocicarpo

« Reply #23 on: October 12, 2012, 09:46 »
+1
AS I recall, school careers advisers are there specifically to tell people that it is impossible to do what they would like to do because there aren't any jobs in it, so  you have to go and study to work in a shop or a laboratory or something. 

For six years I knew exactly what I wanted to do, then, when I was 16, I was told it was not possible and I had to do something "sensible" (to nods of parental approval), so I spent the next 35 years doing stuff that wasn't really right for me before managing to get at least partly back to what I had wanted when I was 15.

OMG you are so right. I got told in school like 80 times a day that I should not do something which has to do with art. It was screwing finally up my way in life since I listened a bit too much, learned first a "normal" profession. Thanks God I found my way a few years later, starting to do all sorts of art and design, now being in microstock. Funny thing: when I look back right now, many of my schoolmates who worked at banks, large companies etc. lost their Jobs and are now hopeless while I am confident that I will always and ever come along somehow with my creativity :-)

RacePhoto

« Reply #24 on: October 12, 2012, 14:28 »
+2
The video simply says:

Choose a job you love, and you will never have to work a day in your life.
― Confucius

+1  Nice pictures too!

I wish the education system spent more energy trying to get to the heart of a kid's true talents and developing those, rather than being orchestrated by government policy to force creative, imaginative kids into sciences etc. to benefit the economy. 

I think you need to be a little more open minded. I happen to like the sciences, and went into college to study physics and chemistry because I enjoyed it so much. I ended up doing other things, but did archaeology work for a local museum, as a volunteer, because I like it so much. Interesting concept, paying to work for free?  :)

And consider this, if they executed every archaeologist and, geologist and anthropologist, tomorrow, the next graduating class would fill all the positions. There's no shortage. These people ARE creative and imaginative. They love what they are doing, just as much as any artist who's creating things from their mind.

The reason there's no "good income" for most artists, writers, poets and photographers (and musicians I might as well add) is the same. Too many good people and the way up is long and hard no matter what field you choose.

He does cover the trap quite well. If you work for money or wealth or income, you get into a cycle of never having enough and always wanting more money and therefore miss the enjoyment of living. It becomes just as bad of an addiction as drugs. Money won't make you happy, but neither will poverty.

Happiness comes from inside!



 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
18 Replies
5284 Views
Last post May 07, 2010, 15:53
by lisafx
17 Replies
5364 Views
Last post January 06, 2009, 03:21
by Dreamframer
27 Replies
6604 Views
Last post February 05, 2009, 11:18
by Pixart
7 Replies
3267 Views
Last post October 25, 2009, 09:30
by Buzbuzzer
11 Replies
3660 Views
Last post September 30, 2010, 21:37
by jbarber873

Sponsors

Microstock Poll Results