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Author Topic: The Hummer Thread  (Read 1198 times)

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« on: September 30, 2021, 23:08 »
+3
Continuing the 'Hummer' thread from the SS forum which will soon expire in late October. Hopefully, there will be some wildlife discussion here and all manner of other topics too. And also a place for people from the old SS forum to hang out.


« Reply #1 on: October 01, 2021, 10:12 »
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The reason is a pity, but nice of you to continue the topic here!!

« Reply #2 on: October 01, 2021, 11:10 »
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Welcome! Good to see you here, Thijs.

« Reply #3 on: October 01, 2021, 13:53 »
+5
Continuing the 'Hummer' thread from the SS forum which will soon expire in late October. Hopefully, there will be some wildlife discussion here and all manner of other topics too. And also a place for people from the old SS forum to hang out.

For those of us who were not regulars on the Shutterstock forums, could you outline what the topic/purpose of the Hummer Thread is?

« Reply #4 on: October 01, 2021, 18:36 »
+3
For those of us who were not regulars on the Shutterstock forums, could you outline what the topic/purpose of the Hummer Thread is?

A very good question. With the word 'hummer', some people might think of a certain car. But I believe in this case, it relates to the hummingbird. So discussions about birds and other wildlife do feature a lot. But it's not limited to wildlife. Many other topics are discussed as well. The reason it developed on the SS forums is because there was no 'off topic' sub-forum over there. So basically, the Hummer thread was an off topic thread. That's the purpose it served.

Now some people might wonder what is the point of having the Hummer thread here as there is already an off topic sub-forum that is kind of used for the same thing more or less. Though on the Hummer thread over on SS, there was only a fairly small number of forum members who contributed. But at the same time a huge number of views - 1.5 million. I opened up this thread so that many of the people who participated on the SS Hummer thread could catch up here and continue their discussions. And other people who are not SS forum regulars are welcome to join in too.

« Reply #5 on: October 01, 2021, 20:54 »
+1
Continuing the 'Hummer' thread from the SS forum which will soon expire in late October. Hopefully, there will be some wildlife discussion here and all manner of other topics too. And also a place for people from the old SS forum to hang out.

For those of us who were not regulars on the Shutterstock forums, could you outline what the topic/purpose of the Hummer Thread is?

Thanks for asking that, JoAnn. I was going to but you beat me to it.

I'm one of the bird/wildlife photographers here, so it might be of some interest to me.

« Reply #6 on: October 01, 2021, 22:48 »
+2
Martha, that's great to know. There's one particular bird that I would really like to photograph and that's the humming bird. But I confess that Ive never seen one in my life as I live in Australia. I know that they are unique to the Americas. I visited Canada in the late 90s and was hoping to see hummingbirds there but didn't see any. A few years ago, I went to Michigan, US but didn't see any there either. Though I did see fireflies for the first time in Michigan and they were amazing. Really surreal. I regret not being able to photograph them because my camera battery was being charged at the time.

« Reply #7 on: October 01, 2021, 23:29 »
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Martha, that's great to know. There's one particular bird that I would really like to photograph and that's the humming bird. But I confess that Ive never seen one in my life as I live in Australia. I know that they are unique to the Americas. I visited Canada in the late 90s and was hoping to see hummingbirds there but didn't see any. A few years ago, I went to Michigan, US but didn't see any there either. Though I did see fireflies for the first time in Michigan and they were amazing. Really surreal. I regret not being able to photograph them because my camera battery was being charged at the time.

Best place to see and photograph hummingbirds is in the Southwest: Arizona, California, New Mexico. 

I happen to live in NM and travel a lot in AZ, so I've had plenty of opportunities to see 'em.  But stili, they're a tremendous challenge to photograph. Getting good action shots takes bright light, fast lenses, skill, and being in the right place at the right time (ie, luck). I only use natural light, no flash.

I chose this one as the "cover" shot for my Wildlife Collection on AS:

https://stock.adobe.com/images/immature-broad-tailed-hummingbird-feeds-in-yellow-sunflower/89024271

If you click that link and then the "see more" link below that featured image, you'll find a few more of mine.

Lots of my shots are of immature hummers in my own back yard, which I no longer have. Because I planted hummingbird mint, sunflowers, Russian sage, and a few other hummer magnets, I got to "shoot" lots of babies as they were taking their first flights away from the nest.
« Last Edit: October 01, 2021, 23:54 by marthamarks »

« Reply #8 on: October 02, 2021, 04:01 »
+1
Some nice imagery there of the hummers. Ah that's good to know of the best states to see them. My sister has seen hummingbirds when travelling through South America.

Oh yea I could imagine that they would be very challenging to photograph! I guess you prefocus on a flower and wait for them to move into the right spot?

And that's a good move setting up your garden to attract the hummers. Must be great seeing them in your own backyard.

« Reply #9 on: October 02, 2021, 08:24 »
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My sister has seen hummingbirds when travelling through South America.

That's where they're all heading right now. They spend half the year in South America and the other half "up here."

I guess you prefocus on a flower and wait for them to move into the right spot?

No, once they move into the garden in good light, I follow them with my lens, shooting steadily, and throw away all the no-goods.

Must be great seeing them in your own backyard.

Yes, that's quite fun. They're noisy too, literally "humming" as they flit around.

And the Rufous hummers are aggressive. They arrive later than the others and chase them.

« Reply #10 on: October 03, 2021, 05:56 »
+2
I was never a regular poster on the Hummer thread but I do know a few of you from there. Might get to catch up with you from time to time here now :)
Dragonblade = Patrick?!

« Reply #11 on: October 03, 2021, 09:17 »
+1
Strange atmosphere now in the shutter forum, there is still quite a lot traffic in the "Show and Tell" section, like the titanic orchestra  :(

« Reply #12 on: October 03, 2021, 17:38 »
0
Continuing the 'Hummer' thread from the SS forum which will soon expire in late October. Hopefully, there will be some wildlife discussion here and all manner of other topics too. And also a place for people from the old SS forum to hang out.

For those of us who were not regulars on the Shutterstock forums, could you outline what the topic/purpose of the Hummer Thread is?

off topic chat thread, just chatter, wont take off here knowing the audience, but maybe with the influx off ss posters it might get some traction,

« Reply #13 on: October 15, 2021, 02:29 »
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I was never a regular poster on the Hummer thread but I do know a few of you from there. Might get to catch up with you from time to time here now :)
Dragonblade = Patrick?!

Hey there Caymia. Good to have you onboard.
« Last Edit: October 15, 2021, 08:05 by dragonblade »

Uncle Pete

  • Great Place by a Great Lake - My Home Port
« Reply #14 on: October 16, 2021, 10:53 »
0
My sister has seen hummingbirds when travelling through South America.

That's where they're all heading right now. They spend half the year in South America and the other half "up here."

I guess you prefocus on a flower and wait for them to move into the right spot?

No, once they move into the garden in good light, I follow them with my lens, shooting steadily, and throw away all the no-goods.

Must be great seeing them in your own backyard.

Yes, that's quite fun. They're noisy too, literally "humming" as they flit around.

And the Rufous hummers are aggressive. They arrive later than the others and chase them.

Interesting. Ours already left, probably four weeks ago. One day at the feeder, the next none anywhere. They hang out in the hanging petunia planters too. I'd call them social, as they will come around, even when I'm sitting on the porch six feet away. And yes they do sound like a giant insect. If I can hear them, they must be loud. Wisconsin.



Not fantastic, back lighting, in the shade, but fun. I'd agree with your answer. Sit wait, shoot 100 photos or more and see if you got one good one.

« Reply #15 on: October 16, 2021, 12:02 »
+1
In the Netherlands we have no hummingbirds, I have seen them long ago in the covered Dutch butterfly garden in Emmen. Unfortunately I didn't have a good camera at the time.
But we sometimes have a Hummingbird hawk-moth (Macroglossum stellatarum) in the garden. A diurnal moth. They are difficult to photograph and resemble hummingbirds in the way they flying soek honey. (Photo not in focus for Shutter of course. I was hoping for a better photo this year, but unfortunately didn't see them. Better next year I hope)
« Last Edit: Yesterday at 01:17 by thijsdegraaf »


 

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