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Author Topic: The way Photographers are Treated - or Mistreated  (Read 1648 times)

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Goofy

« on: February 27, 2014, 13:29 »
0
Recently, I did a photo session of food images for a nearby culinary school with their head chef making all the dishes for that particular class. I was told not to enter the kitchen or interfere with the students thus set up a table outside of the kitchen area for the chef to bring me the finish products in which I shot (only a few minutes) and returned to him.

Before the photo session we agreed on no fees being be charged by me and that the fully (high resolution) processed images would be copied onto a CD (3 copies) for him and his cooking school owner to use for their marketing.  In return, I was allowed to add the images to my stock inventory.
I thought all went well and provided the images to them within two days. I sent them an email thanking them and asking what they thought and if they wanted me to shot any additional products.
Its been almost a month now and no response whatsoever from the head chef or the owner of the food school.  Thus telling me that they are not interested in my services is this common? My wife tells me not to take it personal but how can I not?
The sales of my images have been okay but not selling like hot cakes either.   Are photographer treated as such in this industry?

Any thoughts are welcome


Ron

« Reply #1 on: February 27, 2014, 13:32 »
+2
Its normal, plus, you have your shots, so why care.

lisafx

« Reply #2 on: February 27, 2014, 13:37 »
+3
I can appreciate your frustration.  However I don't think this was mistreatment of you as a photographer so much as just general lack of courtesy that seems to be epidemic nowadays. 

I agree with Ron that at least you have your pictures and your business is concluded with them. 

You may hear from them in the future when they need you again, and you can take their attitude, along with the low sales of the images, into account when you quote them your FEE for doing any more shots.  ;)

farbled

« Reply #3 on: February 27, 2014, 13:44 »
+3
Absolutely normal here too. You only hear from clients when they want something more. That's the nature of it usually. I often do the exact same kind of shoot with other subjects and I never get any replies, feedback, etc. I drop a line a few months later to see if I can re-shoot things I neglected or think I could do better. Be happy, get the shots, the practice and the sales. :)

Goofy

« Reply #4 on: February 27, 2014, 13:45 »
+1
thank you both on the good comments!

 I wonder if when clients see us bring in the equipment (lighting and camera stuff) that they feel that I am making a lot of money and that I should pay them when shooting? The head chef did tell me that he can make much better food items in an 'Controlled' environment such as my home but that would mean that I have to pay for the food ingredients and his time.  So far I've made less than $10 (Combined) on all the sales for this session (36 approved images on Shutter and other sites). 

lisafx

« Reply #5 on: February 27, 2014, 13:55 »
+3
thank you both on the good comments!

 I wonder if when clients see us bring in the equipment (lighting and camera stuff) that they feel that I am making a lot of money and that I should pay them when shooting? The head chef did tell me that he can make much better food items in an 'Controlled' environment such as my home but that would mean that I have to pay for the food ingredients and his time.  So far I've made less than $10 (Combined) on all the sales for this session (36 approved images on Shutter and other sites).

Yikes.  Based on those sales, it sounds as though the chef should have been paying you, not the other way around. 

But I believe a big ego is standard issue for many chefs.  Was his name Gordon Ramsey by any chance... ;D

Goofy

« Reply #6 on: February 27, 2014, 14:03 »
0
Nope on Ramsey- a local Chef (not famous for sure) that takes basic Sushi stuff. Some of my friends (Japanese) told me that the shots that I took are 'Low End' sushi items (i.e., California and spicy Tuna Rolls) that don't even exist in Japan.

« Reply #7 on: February 27, 2014, 14:22 »
+2
I have found out that within the photography business there are many unknown factors:
1.. models are not showing up as we agreed on.
2.. Cameras are full of oil spills from the factory.
3...Agencies do not keep their promises.

Well if so, I can play by those rules as well. Back to the viking ages.

Beppe Grillo

« Reply #8 on: February 27, 2014, 14:53 »
+6
It depends a lot of your cost.

The more you cost the more the customer appreciate your work Whatever the quality
 :o

« Reply #9 on: February 27, 2014, 15:08 »
+3
If they weren't happy with your work you would hear from them.
If they were happy with your work you'll hear from them when they need more.

Goofy

« Reply #10 on: February 27, 2014, 16:08 »
0
If they weren't happy with your work you would hear from them.
If they were happy with your work you'll hear from them when they need more.

Time will tell which one...

« Reply #11 on: February 28, 2014, 09:38 »
0
When I was a newspaper photographer, chefs were the worst people to work with in general. There were exceptions, and a few that were great, but overall I found it easier to do shoots with movie stars than chefs, even though they have less handlers. Likely the case here.

Beppe Grillo

« Reply #12 on: February 28, 2014, 10:46 »
+5
When I was a newspaper photographer, chefs were the worst people to work with in general. There were exceptions, and a few that were great, but overall I found it easier to do shoots with movie stars than chefs, even though they have less handlers. Likely the case here.

One of my best friend is an enough famous chef
I have stopped to make photos for him to not stop to be friend with him

« Reply #13 on: February 28, 2014, 22:19 »
0
One of my best friend is an enough famous chef
I have stopped to make photos for him to not stop to be friend with him

Smart move. More people should think like you!

Uncle Pete

« Reply #14 on: March 01, 2014, 12:02 »
0
Darn and stupid me, I'm working on a deal where I manage a website for a Chinese restaurant and take photos for them and get paid in food. Friends since the 80s! (will work for food...)

But I do appreciate what Beppe says. Sometimes business can ruin good friendships.

One of my best friend is an enough famous chef
I have stopped to make photos for him to not stop to be friend with him

Smart move. More people should think like you!

« Reply #15 on: March 01, 2014, 12:15 »
0
I can agree, I no longer do any work for friends. I'll refer them to folks, but will not do the work myself. They can be the worst clients and tend to expect the extras for free if not the whole thing. It just strains relationships. For businesses that I can benefit from I still tend to charge...sometimes a reduced rate, but I charge none the less. For some reason a client appreciates the work more when they pay for it...it isn't always about the quality of the work.

« Reply #16 on: March 01, 2014, 21:06 »
+1
Are photographer treated as such in this industry?

in any yep, nobody gives a rat **ck about it, you can be famous or not, they can fire you easily if there is a guy willing to work for a few quid less or even for free, this week on twitter a famous music photographer said that after working for over 18 years with a major venue in London they have laid her off because they opted for the free photographer, not much excitement in photography beside the love we have for it


 

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