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Author Topic: UAS and Model Aircraft - AKA "Drones"  (Read 25130 times)

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Shelma1

« Reply #25 on: January 13, 2015, 12:06 »
0
Yes to the plane crash. The pilot had already crashed a plane, and from what I've read his family wanted him to stop flying, but instead he bought a bigger plane and ended up killing himself, his son, a mom and her two babies who were home when his plane came down. The husband who lived there lost his wife and two of his three children, and the house was completely destroyed. Very sad.


« Reply #26 on: January 13, 2015, 17:02 »
+1
Paparazzi using drones: http://www.cbsnews.com/news/paparazzi-take-to-the-skies-to-pursue-stars-with-drones/

"Yeah, absolutely," he said. "You're walking down Rodeo Drive here in Beverly Hills, and there's a pack of paparazzi. Why wouldn't there be 30 drones flying over them?" Yup

These things definitely look like a lot of fun but as the technology evolves and the price comes down the dirtbags will take advantage in the worst ways. Not just paparazzi but drug dealers could make drops in town or across the border, hacks will be created to weaponize them. In my opinion, any number of nefarious uses will inevitably make these annoying at best and more-than-likely dangerous.

-Mat

Shelma1

« Reply #27 on: January 15, 2015, 13:55 »
+1
Article today in the NY Times about news organizations joining Virginia Tech in testing drones in the airspace. So now I can look forward to the Times overflying my house. (Our tiny airport is one of the test sites.) The video is interesting.

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/01/16/business/media/10-companies-join-effort-to-test-drones-for-newsgathering.html?emc=edit_tnt_20150115&nlid=26752818&tntemail0=y&_r=0

« Reply #28 on: January 16, 2015, 01:24 »
+2

"Last year, a group of media organizations, including the Associated Press, New York Times and Tribune Co., filed an amicus brief in a case challenging the FAAs legal authority to regulate drones. They complained that the FAAs overly broad policy violates the First Amendment and has already had an impermissible chilling effect on some journalists reporting."

or

"In countries where drone rules are less restrictive, journalists are already using them to gather news. Drones helped show the scope of recent protests in Thailand and Hong Kong. BBC has used the devices to do some reporting. And last year, CBS News used a drone to explore the contaminated areas around the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine."
You can be sure that gov wants to be able to watch you but they don't want you to be able to watch them.

As far as safety concerns, should we outlaw something because somebody somewhere might be injured someday?

What about kids riding bicycles, they get going pretty fast and some of those kids are big. What if one hits somebody and injures them? Better make bicycles illegal. And what about home swimming pools? You know how many people drown in them every year? Better make those illegal too. And silverware. Those knives and forks are too sharp to be used at the dinner tables of people who might suddenly decide to stab each other or do so by accident. Only plastic spoons should be legal.

« Reply #29 on: January 16, 2015, 08:51 »
0

"Last year, a group of media organizations, including the Associated Press, New York Times and Tribune Co., filed an amicus brief in a case challenging the FAAs legal authority to regulate drones. They complained that the FAAs overly broad policy violates the First Amendment and has already had an impermissible chilling effect on some journalists reporting."

or

"In countries where drone rules are less restrictive, journalists are already using them to gather news. Drones helped show the scope of recent protests in Thailand and Hong Kong. BBC has used the devices to do some reporting. And last year, CBS News used a drone to explore the contaminated areas around the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine."
You can be sure that gov wants to be able to watch you but they don't want you to be able to watch them.

As far as safety concerns, should we outlaw something because somebody somewhere might be injured someday?

What about kids riding bicycles, they get going pretty fast and some of those kids are big. What if one hits somebody and injures them? Better make bicycles illegal. And what about home swimming pools? You know how many people drown in them every year? Better make those illegal too. And silverware. Those knives and forks are too sharp to be used at the dinner tables of people who might suddenly decide to stab each other or do so by accident. Only plastic spoons should be legal.

To stay on topic: Drones are cool when used responsibly.

Off topic: You really have a cool portfolio, Michael.

Shelma1

« Reply #30 on: January 16, 2015, 09:08 »
0

"Last year, a group of media organizations, including the Associated Press, New York Times and Tribune Co., filed an amicus brief in a case challenging the FAAs legal authority to regulate drones. They complained that the FAAs overly broad policy violates the First Amendment and has already had an impermissible chilling effect on some journalists reporting."

or

"In countries where drone rules are less restrictive, journalists are already using them to gather news. Drones helped show the scope of recent protests in Thailand and Hong Kong. BBC has used the devices to do some reporting. And last year, CBS News used a drone to explore the contaminated areas around the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine."
You can be sure that gov wants to be able to watch you but they don't want you to be able to watch them.

As far as safety concerns, should we outlaw something because somebody somewhere might be injured someday?

What about kids riding bicycles, they get going pretty fast and some of those kids are big. What if one hits somebody and injures them? Better make bicycles illegal. And what about home swimming pools? You know how many people drown in them every year? Better make those illegal too. And silverware. Those knives and forks are too sharp to be used at the dinner tables of people who might suddenly decide to stab each other or do so by accident. Only plastic spoons should be legal.

Who's talking about outlawing them? The FAA is trying to determine how they'll operate in existing airspace and how to set reasonable regulations for operating them. All the items you mentioned have regulations, possibly with the exception of silverware. Bicyclists have hit and killed pedestrians, just recently in Central Park, leading to bike speed restrictions there. Kids are required to wear helmets while on a bike. Pools have regulations, and you can't get a certificate of occupancy for your house without meeting them, at least where I live. I'm sure there are even more regulations regarding public poolsrequiring lifeguards and use of chemicals, for example.

ruxpriencdiam

    This user is banned.
  • Location. Third stone from the sun
« Reply #31 on: January 16, 2015, 09:20 »
-2
Bicycle laws have been in effect for well more than 40 years.

If you ride a bicycle on any street in any state you must obey the traffic laws and that includes speed limits, stop signs, stop lights, crosswalks and everything else.

I got pulled and warned by police when I was 14 or so for going 30mph and the speed limit where I was was 25mph.

No  one truly enforces bicycle laws no matter if they are on the books or not.


"Last year, a group of media organizations, including the Associated Press, New York Times and Tribune Co., filed an amicus brief in a case challenging the FAAs legal authority to regulate drones. They complained that the FAAs overly broad policy violates the First Amendment and has already had an impermissible chilling effect on some journalists reporting."

or

"In countries where drone rules are less restrictive, journalists are already using them to gather news. Drones helped show the scope of recent protests in Thailand and Hong Kong. BBC has used the devices to do some reporting. And last year, CBS News used a drone to explore the contaminated areas around the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine."
You can be sure that gov wants to be able to watch you but they don't want you to be able to watch them.

As far as safety concerns, should we outlaw something because somebody somewhere might be injured someday?

What about kids riding bicycles, they get going pretty fast and some of those kids are big. What if one hits somebody and injures them? Better make bicycles illegal. And what about home swimming pools? You know how many people drown in them every year? Better make those illegal too. And silverware. Those knives and forks are too sharp to be used at the dinner tables of people who might suddenly decide to stab each other or do so by accident. Only plastic spoons should be legal.

Who's talking about outlawing them? The FAA is trying to determine how they'll operate in existing airspace and how to set reasonable regulations for operating them. All the items you mentioned have regulations, possibly with the exception of silverware. Bicyclists have hit and killed pedestrians, just recently in Central Park, leading to bike speed restrictions there. Kids are required to wear helmets while on a bike. Pools have regulations, and you can't get a certificate of occupancy for your house without meeting them, at least where I live. I'm sure there are even more regulations regarding public poolsrequiring lifeguards and use of chemicals, for example.

« Reply #32 on: January 18, 2015, 00:50 »
0
 Drones are interested in pictures and video so often seek out " interesting sites" which contain much higher populations.

Uncle Pete

« Reply #33 on: January 22, 2015, 11:32 »
0
Well here we go. If you can use it, you can abuse it:   ???

Traffickers have used drones to do their dirty work for several years, according to the Latin Times. The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration reported that, in 2012, about 150 passes were made across the U.S.-Mexico border. Over the summer, there came reports that Mexican drug cartels were building drones to move narcotics into the United States.

Last year, a drone carrying marijuana, tobacco and cellphones crashed outside a South Carolina prison. One was even used to sneak cigarettes into Russia.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/morning-mix/wp/2015/01/22/a-meth-toting-drone-just-crashed-in-tijuana/

Not that this has anything to do with the local issue, photographers and drones. But it was amusing. Overloaded drug drone crashes...


« Reply #34 on: January 22, 2015, 11:45 »
0
Chase Jarvis just unpacked a new one this morning (says something like "what do I call it, a drone?")  New gizmo to be released at the end of the month - just in case you want your own before they are banned :)

https://www.facebook.com/video.php?v=10152593149955978&set=vb.58624920977&type=2&theater

Uncle Pete

« Reply #35 on: January 22, 2015, 13:21 »
0
Well I must compliment Chase for his excellent R2D2 imitation during the unboxing. (people say sarcasm doesn't play well in messages, hope people get that one, it's annoying as heck Mr. Jarvis)

Wow, I'd have to decide new UAV or replace two cars and the riding lawn mower, with one good car? Hmm, which will it be?

4K video and 12MP stills, that is impressive.

I remember when I launched a rocket and as the parachute deployed, it would trip the shutter and take one photo on B&W 16MM film. We thought that was really up there in space.  ::) Then We'd run home to the dark room (if we found the rocket and the camera) develop and have ONE really cool photo!

Now you can watch on the remote controller 720P live?

My Brother gave me a "Drone" for Christmas. It's still in the box. Came with spare batteries and spare propellers. Smart guy, isn't he? Plan ahead. I think it was $14.99 on ebay and has a camera, takes some tiny size video. I'll go terrorize some cows in the Spring (not really, but I will go take pictures of them) No GPS, doesn't fly in the wind and I won't be taking it out over water, but what the heck, it could be fun?


Chase Jarvis just unpacked a new one this morning (says something like "what do I call it, a drone?")  New gizmo to be released at the end of the month - just in case you want your own before they are banned :)

https://www.facebook.com/video.php?v=10152593149955978&set=vb.58624920977&type=2&theater

ruxpriencdiam

    This user is banned.
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« Reply #36 on: January 26, 2015, 08:18 »
-4
Drone found on the White House lawn this morning i the wake of a historic Blizzard that is arriving and it is  already snowing in DC!

Gee I wonder why?

Think maybe just maybe because someone wanted to get aerials of the snowstorm and perhaps the wind blew it off course and into the Lawn.

Now another reason for limitations.

« Reply #37 on: January 26, 2015, 10:13 »
+1


I remember when I launched a rocket and as the parachute deployed, it would trip the shutter and take one photo on B&W 16MM film. We thought that was really up there in space.  ::) Then We'd run home to the dark room (if we found the rocket and the camera) develop and have ONE really cool photo!


I had one of those too and it was incredible magic at the time. Now we have so many toys that I don't know what to do half the time.

Uncle Pete

« Reply #38 on: January 26, 2015, 21:11 »
+1
We need to ban SUVs also: A woman has been shot dead outside the US Capitol after first trying to ram a barrier at the White House and then leading police on a car chase through the streets of Washington.


And we need to ban airplanes and private pilots: Shortly before 2 A.M. today, a small red-and-white plane flew low over 17th Street in the heart of the capital's downtown, banked left in a U-turn near the Washington Monument, and headed straight toward the President's bedroom in the White House.

Also knives and people from Texas:  A Texas man armed with a knife was able to get over a White House fence in September (2014) and run deep into the executive mansion before being subdued.

Drone found on the White House lawn this morning i the wake of a historic Blizzard that is arriving and it is  already snowing in DC!

Gee I wonder why?

Think maybe just maybe because someone wanted to get aerials of the snowstorm and perhaps the wind blew it off course and into the Lawn.

Now another reason for limitations.

I know why. The problem is Humans.

w7lwi

  • Those that don't stand up to evil enable evil.
« Reply #39 on: January 26, 2015, 21:33 »
0
Guess what ... it's against the law to operate a drone in Washington D.C.  Since when is a law against something going to stop anyone?  It's against the law to do a lot of things, but some people still do them.  Or, as Captain Barbosa said on the first Pirates of the Caribbean, "they're more like guidelines."

ruxpriencdiam

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« Reply #40 on: February 09, 2015, 19:15 »
0
And today there are reports from LA, Chicago, Dallas and others with drones being flown at airports with pilot sightings from 1,800 feet to as high as 8,500 feet!

The laws are boiling in the pots somewhere just waiting for the simmering and distribution.

« Reply #41 on: February 09, 2015, 20:53 »
0
Guess what ... it's against the law to operate a drone in Washington D.C.  Since when is a law against something going to stop anyone?  It's against the law to do a lot of things, but some people still do them.  Or, as Captain Barbosa said on the first Pirates of the Caribbean, "they're more like guidelines."
Maybe small SAMs

« Reply #42 on: February 10, 2015, 04:45 »
+1
Those goddamn commies and their drone thingamabubs. If I see one within a mile of my property I'll take a twelve gauge to it and that'll be all she wrote.
« Last Edit: February 10, 2015, 05:12 by Red Dove »

Uncle Pete

« Reply #43 on: February 10, 2015, 08:40 »
0
Drones are illegal at the race courses, so are fireworks, guns, kites and... OK you get the idea. We had a safety team meet last month, and I said, someone could start off the property and fly over and take photos, then fly back. They aren't "on the property".

When someone owns the land, like any of us or a business, they do not own the air space over it and often not the mineral rights under it.

Just one more case where someone could get into trouble.

My answer was much like yours. Allow the staff to bring shotguns from home. If the UAV is over the race track, we shout PULL and blast it out of the air!  ;D Not really a safe and sensible idea, but it's sounds like fun?

The models have GPS and are now being programmed so they can't fly within 5 miles of an airport. Also the White House and I'm sure other locations. That's one way to deal with people who can't understand self control and living within the regulations or acting in a sensible manner.

Another idea would be a Government drone that captures UAVs. (only when they are flying illegally) Kind of like the  old tractor beam or the big doors that open and the little space ship is captured by the big one. This big drone, flies up and "recovers" the little ones. Brings them back and the officials can check to see who it belongs to and issue a citation.

We have your drone, pay the fine and get your toy back.



Those goddamn commies and their drone thingamabubs. If I see one within a mile of my property I'll take a twelve gauge to it and that'll be all she wrote.

« Reply #44 on: February 10, 2015, 10:03 »
0
Uncle Pete, you're being stymied in an attempt to make sense of a world regulated by government bots, trying to regulate a renegade populace.

Uncle Pete

« Reply #45 on: February 10, 2015, 19:12 »
0
I'd agree and it will never end.

I'm just angry because I don't have my own Drone with a HD GoPro on it. I still want to fly like a bird, over cows and cornfields...  ;D But come on, why would I spend a couple grand to do that? At least some people have sensible commercial uses, and that's what's banned?

So what do we get? People with loads of money, buying a toy, and causing these personal invasions of privacy and disruptions. Heck, maybe it should be "only for commercial use", licensed, and then restrict the private use?

Yes, just a thought. You probably know my viewpoint. I'm for freedom of choice and rights being with individuals not bloated or oppressive government regulations.


Uncle Pete, you're being stymied in an attempt to make sense of a world regulated by government bots, trying to regulate a renegade populace.

ruxpriencdiam

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« Reply #46 on: February 10, 2015, 20:16 »
0
To hell with drones and go pros!

Get a Mad Max one man copter with a real DSLR and go to it!

And as long as you stay under 400 feet all is fine have fun and just don't run outta gas!

I'd agree and it will never end.

I'm just angry because I don't have my own Drone with a HD GoPro on it. I still want to fly like a bird, over cows and cornfields...  ;D But come on, why would I spend a couple grand to do that? At least some people have sensible commercial uses, and that's what's banned?

So what do we get? People with loads of money, buying a toy, and causing these personal invasions of privacy and disruptions. Heck, maybe it should be "only for commercial use", licensed, and then restrict the private use?

Yes, just a thought. You probably know my viewpoint. I'm for freedom of choice and rights being with individuals not bloated or oppressive government regulations.


Uncle Pete, you're being stymied in an attempt to make sense of a world regulated by government bots, trying to regulate a renegade populace.

« Reply #47 on: February 10, 2015, 20:36 »
0
I filmed with a couple of GoPros last year and got pretty tired of them. I see that there are copters now that take Real Man cameras with serious optics.

ruxpriencdiam

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« Reply #48 on: February 11, 2015, 17:37 »
0
So I live in a military flight path.

Now I have trees that are easily 100-200 feet tall and I get Jets coming over top of them at speeds easily reaching 400-500 mph that their jet wash bends the tops of the trees so this tells you how low they are which is well below the radar for training purposes I am sure but now what if I was flying a drone in my air space under 400 feet and one of these jets flew into it and sucked it into their engine and then they crashed !

Whos fault is it?

Not mine but yet it will be!

Even though I am under 400 feet the military will do all their BS testing and determine it is my fault rather then admit to what they did that is wrong!

Shelma1

« Reply #49 on: February 11, 2015, 18:55 »
0
Are you within 5 miles of an airport or military airport? If so, flying drones there at any height is illegal, as far as I know. Unless they're testing them at the airport, like they will be at mine. Then it's just hunky dory to have them skimming your rooftop and treetops.


 

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