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Author Topic: Unbelievable news! Interstellar traveling soon possible  (Read 4084 times)

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« on: August 07, 2011, 18:43 »
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Scientists proved that Earth's magnetic field accumulates antimatter produces in collision of cosmic rays with matter, in certain zones near the Earth. In these zones antimatter is 1000 times more concentrated than usual. The amount of antimatter that could be collected in one year is enough to make an interplanetary trip to Saturn, which magnetic field collects  even more antimatter. Speeds would be tremendous, with constant acceleration of 100km per seconds, which means that spacecraft with this acceleration would soon reach the speeds close to the speed of light. Traveling to planets in Solar System would take hours or days to complete. Near the Saturn, there is enough antimatter to travel to stars.
Now it's all the question of money, and a few technical problems.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-14405122


« Reply #1 on: August 07, 2011, 19:27 »
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In a way it is laughable that we Earthlings have an energy problem.  The amount of free energy reaching this planet from the Sun could power our wildest dreams - if we could, for example, harvest it from orbiting panels and beam it down via microwaves.  Instead we're still burning fossil fuels, a Stone Age technology. 

I'll enjoy the pictures and data from the new unmanned probes NASA will be sending up (one to Jupiter this week, a new Mars rover on the way) but I'm less excited about those missions than I used to be.  I'd rather see the billions poured into basic research in hard sciences like physics and chemistry.  We need some breakthroughs, and soon.

« Reply #2 on: August 08, 2011, 01:37 »
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I wonder if that'll bum out CERN with their new anti-proton factory, the antiproton decelerator.

Still, at speeds less than light we won't go very far very fast... and aren't they already creating anti-matter in abundance in various cylotrons around the world?

I remember being shocked that they are already using anti-matter in medicine in the PET scan

« Reply #3 on: August 08, 2011, 02:18 »
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The problem with the solar power is that it can be stored only as an electric power. But engine that uses antimatter is 10 000 000 000 more efficient than anything else. It's an ultimate energy source because only that way the whole mass of the fuel transforms into energy according to e=mc^2

Antimatter produced in CERN is 1 000 000 less than needed for interplanetary flight.

« Reply #4 on: August 08, 2011, 02:44 »
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...Now it's all the question of money, and a few technical problems.
That made me LOL, the few small technical problems could take hundreds of years to overcome.  In theory, lots of the science in Star Trek is possible but the practical application of these things is beyond us.  Would be interesting to jump 500 years and see if we have made much progress but I have a few technical problems with my time machine :)

« Reply #5 on: August 08, 2011, 03:26 »
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...Now it's all the question of money, and a few technical problems.
That made me LOL, the few small technical problems could take hundreds of years to overcome.  In theory, lots of the science in Star Trek is possible but the practical application of these things is beyond us.  Would be interesting to jump 500 years and see if we have made much progress but I have a few technical problems with my time machine :)

LOL, ok, it's not 500 years. It is basically possible with today's technology, so we don't have to wait for technological development. The only real problem is money, which doesn't have to be a problem if people realize how important this is. It's always better not to wait for aliens to find us unprepared. :))

lthn

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« Reply #6 on: August 08, 2011, 03:43 »
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LOL, ok, it's not 500 years. It is basically possible with today's technology...

Oh really? Could you at least vaguely discribe to me the technology the allows us to contain and store any significant amount of anti matter? Just so you know, even handling pure hidrogen is a big problem...

lthn

    This user is banned.
« Reply #7 on: August 08, 2011, 03:47 »
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In a way it is laughable that we Earthlings have an energy problem.  The amount of free energy reaching this planet from the Sun could power our wildest dreams - if we could, for example, harvest it from orbiting panels and beam it down via microwaves.  Instead we're still burning fossil fuels, a Stone Age technology. 

I'll enjoy the pictures and data from the new unmanned probes NASA will be sending up (one to Jupiter this week, a new Mars rover on the way) but I'm less excited about those missions than I used to be.  I'd rather see the billions poured into basic research in hard sciences like physics and chemistry.  We need some breakthroughs, and soon.

It wouldn't be so laughable if someone gives you the duty of harvestng it efficiently. Just beam it down scotty, right? This is like when some kids see squirrels jumping from one branch to anther... hey that looks so easy, lets try it... and voila, there comes there ambulance : )

« Reply #8 on: August 08, 2011, 04:24 »
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what happens if your traveling at near the speed of light and you hit a speck of space dust  or a fragment of an asteroid etc. I'd like them to work that out before I buy a ticket.

TheSmilingAssassin

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« Reply #9 on: August 08, 2011, 04:33 »
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« Last Edit: August 18, 2011, 23:36 by hasleftthebuilding »

« Reply #10 on: August 08, 2011, 04:39 »
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LOL, ok, it's not 500 years. It is basically possible with today's technology...

Oh really? Could you at least vaguely discribe to me the technology the allows us to contain and store any significant amount of anti matter? Just so you know, even handling pure hidrogen is a big problem...

Just a simple magnetic field is able to keep antimatter in a container. The electric power needed to produce and maintain such a magnetic field is completely achievable. I mean, it's possible today, and it's even not so expensive. Antimatter particles are electrically charged, and they act like any other "matter" particles.

« Reply #11 on: August 08, 2011, 04:41 »
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what happens if your traveling at near the speed of light and you hit a speck of space dust  or a fragment of an asteroid etc. I'd like them to work that out before I buy a ticket.

The same thing that happens when you travel at today's speeds, and some tiny rock hits you. Those rocks sometimes travel 50 miles per second, which means they are many times faster than a bullet. :)

« Reply #12 on: August 08, 2011, 05:07 »
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what happens if your traveling at near the speed of light and you hit a speck of space dust  or a fragment of an asteroid etc. I'd like them to work that out before I buy a ticket.

The same thing that happens when you travel at today's speeds, and some tiny rock hits you. Those rocks sometimes travel 50 miles per second, which means they are many times faster than a bullet. :)
Not the same, as speed increase, the amount of damage that a small particle can do magnifies.  It would be like flying through bullets with only paper to protect you.  Then there's the radiation, that will also kill people travelling vast distances through space, unless they use heavy shields and that makes it harder to go fast.

« Reply #13 on: August 08, 2011, 05:53 »
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what happens if your traveling at near the speed of light and you hit a speck of space dust  or a fragment of an asteroid etc. I'd like them to work that out before I buy a ticket.

The same thing that happens when you travel at today's speeds, and some tiny rock hits you. Those rocks sometimes travel 50 miles per second, which means they are many times faster than a bullet. :)
Not the same, as speed increase, the amount of damage that a small particle can do magnifies.  It would be like flying through bullets with only paper to protect you.  Then there's the radiation, that will also kill people travelling vast distances through space, unless they use heavy shields and that makes it harder to go fast.

Correct. When I said "the same" I meant, one would die one way or another. The only good thing is that Universe is really empty so much, that even asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter don't pose a threat to our probes sent to outer Solar System.
Anyway, I wouldn't want to be the first one to try.

microstockphoto.co.uk

« Reply #14 on: August 08, 2011, 06:14 »
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harvest it from orbiting panels and beam it down via microwaves. 

Not in the 2.4 GHz unlicensed band, please: I am already struggling to find a free channel for my wifi

lthn

    This user is banned.
« Reply #15 on: August 09, 2011, 06:48 »
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LOL, ok, it's not 500 years. It is basically possible with today's technology...

Oh really? Could you at least vaguely discribe to me the technology the allows us to contain and store any significant amount of anti matter? Just so you know, even handling pure hidrogen is a big problem...

Just a simple magnetic field is able to keep antimatter in a container. The electric power needed to produce and maintain such a magnetic field is completely achievable. I mean, it's possible today, and it's even not so expensive. Antimatter particles are electrically charged, and they act like any other "matter" particles.

"Just a simple magnetic field is able to keep antimatter in a container."

:D What if not? Are you ready for the bang? Can you elaborate a bit, how strong that field should be to contain stuff floating thru acceleration (remember it keeps its momentum...). What are the mechanics of something like that, huh?? I'm sorry I don't want to be rude but you seriously should start reading some science books, not tabloid news. Some more popular-istic stuff will do, try 'The emperor's new mind' by Roger Penrose for starters and talk to some engineers about how 'simple' things like that really are... like the ITER project f.e.

« Reply #16 on: August 09, 2011, 07:40 »
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The problem with the solar power is that it can be stored only as an electric power. But engine that uses antimatter is 10 000 000 000 more efficient than anything else. It's an ultimate energy source because only that way the whole mass of the fuel transforms into energy according to e=mc^2

Antimatter produced in CERN is 1 000 000 less than needed for interplanetary flight.

You can store sunlight in lots of different ways - plants turn it into oil and coal, for example, gases produce winds because of it. My solar panel creates hot water.

« Reply #17 on: August 10, 2011, 03:02 »
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"Just a simple magnetic field is able to keep antimatter in a container."

:D What if not? Are you ready for the bang? Can you elaborate a bit, how strong that field should be to contain stuff floating thru acceleration (remember it keeps its momentum...). What are the mechanics of something like that, huh?? I'm sorry I don't want to be rude but you seriously should start reading some science books, not tabloid news. Some more popular-istic stuff will do, try 'The emperor's new mind' by Roger Penrose for starters and talk to some engineers about how 'simple' things like that really are... like the ITER project f.e.

Well, CERN managed to trap anti-hydrogen for 1000 seconds. And they've started work on the world's largest anti-matter trap/containment unit - one which has enough  capacity to contain tens of billions of anti-particles. Anti-matter is already being made in abundance (and can also be found in thunderstorms) but they've only been able to trap it since 2002 - and anti-hydrogen more recently.  It really is only a matter of time....

And woah Roger Penrose is not easy for beginners and doesn't focus on engineering or anti-matter containment

« Reply #18 on: August 10, 2011, 13:11 »
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LOL, ok, it's not 500 years. It is basically possible with today's technology...

Oh really? Could you at least vaguely discribe to me the technology the allows us to contain and store any significant amount of anti matter? Just so you know, even handling pure hidrogen is a big problem...

Just a simple magnetic field is able to keep antimatter in a container. The electric power needed to produce and maintain such a magnetic field is completely achievable. I mean, it's possible today, and it's even not so expensive. Antimatter particles are electrically charged, and they act like any other "matter" particles.

"Just a simple magnetic field is able to keep antimatter in a container."

:D What if not? Are you ready for the bang? Can you elaborate a bit, how strong that field should be to contain stuff floating thru acceleration (remember it keeps its momentum...). What are the mechanics of something like that, huh?? I'm sorry I don't want to be rude but you seriously should start reading some science books, not tabloid news. Some more popular-istic stuff will do, try 'The emperor's new mind' by Roger Penrose for starters and talk to some engineers about how 'simple' things like that really are... like the ITER project f.e.

Wow, :D you are telling me to read more science books. That's the only thing I read. Of course I know it would be a big boom if antimatter escapes from the container. But basically, if you keep the power on, it can't escape. You sound like those people who couldn't believe that nuclear power can't be controlled. Of course we all know that any nuclear plant will make a disaster if we stop to cool down the reactor, but we still have nuclear plants. Also, the amount of antimatter that can be collected around earth is measured in nanograms, and it doesn't have to be brought down to earth. Nanograms are not enough to make a disaster on Earth if the ship is far enough.


 

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