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Author Topic: Are these photos good enough?  (Read 8062 times)

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« on: August 16, 2014, 15:30 »
0
I've applied to get into istock. Do you think these images are good enough? Please critique them. Taken with Nikon D3300

1.https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/14752371350
2.https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/14752370509
3.https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/14752425568

Thanks in advance for your time!


« Reply #1 on: August 16, 2014, 15:49 »
0
Come on guys. I just want an opinion on your thoughts about the images. :-\

« Reply #2 on: August 16, 2014, 15:57 »
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@ 3rd image
dont like the blur effects. make 2 photos and combine them to get a full screen detailed image.
i dont see many images with blur effects i like.

« Reply #3 on: August 16, 2014, 16:05 »
+1
Come on guys. I just want an opinion on your thoughts about the images. :-\
Just my two cents - actually you don't have exactly found a niche. There are uncountable pictures of flowers, many of them are good. Look at the pictures in the agencies and judge for yourself.

« Reply #4 on: August 16, 2014, 16:07 »
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Could you clarify please? Also, do you think these are good enough to make it into istock?

fritz

  • I love Tom and Jerry music

« Reply #5 on: August 16, 2014, 16:32 »
+1
No, they're not! Sorry
Remember before you submit ask yourself who and why would buy my images.
SS search result for flowers 3,587,259 files....

Avoid flowers, landscapes,animals.... unless they're original and unique.
 

Goofy

« Reply #6 on: August 16, 2014, 16:57 »
+2
Just looked at the first image and my exact words were= "OMG"  this is horrible!


Here is a sample of what I consider an Okay shot of a flower- Even this image might not have a chance of passing iStock submission test

http://fineartamerica.com/featured/single-flower-in-spring-rain-tom-baker.html

« Last Edit: August 16, 2014, 17:02 by Goofy »

MxR

« Reply #7 on: August 16, 2014, 17:02 »
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Not for any sale... sorry...! continue learning...

If you approve, surely never sale this images...

Goofy

« Reply #8 on: August 16, 2014, 17:10 »
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FYI

http://www.shutterstock.com/cat.mhtml?searchterm=flower&search_group=&lang=en&language=en&search_source=search_form&version=llv1

Let's see 3.5 million images on Shutterstock thus I am sure iStock has as many-  Don't submit an image that is over-saturation in their inventory! After you get accepted you can toss in a few once in a while.

« Reply #9 on: August 16, 2014, 17:12 »
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Thanks guys! I really appreciate the comments. Any recommendations that can help me improve?

Goofy

« Reply #10 on: August 16, 2014, 17:16 »
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Join some critique clubs - i.e. photosig.com

Study the existing inventory- Shutterstock (popular) and than go out and shot it. Learn what is commercial in value (medical, food, people, business) and shot in those areas. 

Learn how to use off camera lighting- most of us cannot just use natural light- strobes, flashes, reflectors to add to images.  Watch lighting videos on net- there are tons of good free lighting videos for you to learn...

Goofy

« Reply #11 on: August 16, 2014, 17:25 »
+1
Finally,

Ask yourself why do you want to get into this well established business? If you plan on full time than you better like working 18 hour days, taking a shower once or twice a week, and making less than $50 per day! Hate to burst your bubble but it's just a reality of the times...

fritz

  • I love Tom and Jerry music

« Reply #12 on: August 16, 2014, 17:31 »
+3
Well said! I'm diamond (8351 files) but lately can't make more than 30$ per day on iS!
« Last Edit: August 16, 2014, 17:36 by fritz »

Goofy

« Reply #13 on: August 16, 2014, 17:50 »
+4
Well said! I'm diamond (8351 files) but lately can't make more than 30$ per day on iS!

Because your slacking- only working 16 hour days and taking Sunday's off! Get back to to working 7 days a week and your income will reach that $50 per day level  8)


« Reply #14 on: August 16, 2014, 21:11 »
+1
Oh I don't mean that. I'm a high school student looking to earn some pocket money with photography. I've always loved great images. However, I don't know where to start. I'm thinking about signing up for some local photography workshops.

« Reply #15 on: August 16, 2014, 21:31 »
0
it's kind of hard to pass through reviewer with those photos these days.

ShadySue

  • There is a crack in everything
« Reply #16 on: August 16, 2014, 21:45 »
+2
Oh I don't mean that. I'm a high school student looking to earn some pocket money with photography. I've always loved great images. However, I don't know where to start. I'm thinking about signing up for some local photography workshops.
Good idea. Also there are plenty of books, magazines and online courses, depending on your preferred learning style.
Then once you've got the basics of photography down, you'll need to learn stock photography, which is a different beast.
Also, take the time to read other threads on msg to see if it's really likely to be worth your while.

« Reply #17 on: August 17, 2014, 02:42 »
0
If you look on getting accepted and selling the odd photo as a learning experience its a good hard technical training. It won't teach you much about the artistic side of photography though!

ShadySue

  • There is a crack in everything
« Reply #18 on: August 17, 2014, 06:46 »
0
Could you clarify please? Also, do you think these are good enough to make it into istock?
Even though iStock's standards are currently rock bottom, getting pics in is absolutely no guarantee that they will sell, especially nowadays.
Take a good, hard look at the competition and heed the advice above - why would anyone buy mine instead of theirs?

« Reply #19 on: August 17, 2014, 07:12 »
0
You say you have actually applied with these images? Interesting to hear what the results are if you have. I think the initial acceptance may have been made easier there as well as general submissions.
Whether they get you in or not though, I doubt if these images will make you any money on iStock or anywhere else IMHO. I wouldn't upload anything of this standard anywhere if I were you. If you do you'll end up like many other new contributors uploading hundreds of photographs and wondering why they aren't generating sales for you.
You will need to know what subjects to upload, and then you need to manage the quality of your own collection (at iStock at least), and you will need to learn the skills to do so. It's not just about getting the maximum number of images accepted. It's the quality of those images as well.
Finally, if you were a photographer who already had the skills to make commercial images, then you might make some money at stock if you were just starting. If you have to learn from the start then I think you have a long hard road ahead. There is no easy money in this game and there never was.
Good luck with whatever you decide to do.

« Reply #20 on: August 17, 2014, 07:31 »
0
Don't take all that negative critique too hard :)  Most of it is good advise and well-meant ..

And, even if these images get accepted, a very valid question is if they will sell?

A good starting point is to look at Best selling image categories on couple of stock sites.  That gives a good idea of the quality and the type of content that can get sales.

Not to be discouraging .. but its harder and harder to make a reasonable return from even good stock photography these days.  Be ready for a very tough commitment and lots of time if you want to seriously see returns from stock in these times.

ShadySue

  • There is a crack in everything
« Reply #21 on: August 17, 2014, 07:50 »
0
And for managing  your iS recommendations, I recommend reading this thread, and perhaps looking through the ports of those experienced contributors reporting decreases in sales http://www.istockphoto.com/forum_messages.php?threadid=362250&page=1
« Last Edit: August 17, 2014, 08:04 by ShadySue »

« Reply #22 on: August 17, 2014, 08:17 »
+3
To the OP: You really need to learn photography before starting in the stock photography business. Many of the successful stock shooters are professional photographers - that's what is your competition. There are many shooters that can produce tens of quality images per day, and also Photoshop them into perfection.

You also need to start to look how images are used in magazines, ads and on the net. Look at your three images and ask yourself this question: Where could these images be used? On a magazine cover? Postcard? Calendar? Web banner etc. I can not think why anyone would need to use those images for anything. Try to shoot images that are NEEDED and that ARE NOT IN OVER-SUPPLY!

I don't want to sound too harsh or discouraging, but you need to be very critical of your own worl, "a guy with a new camera" might have been ok in 2005, but now it's 2014 and the competition is very stiff.
« Last Edit: August 17, 2014, 08:23 by Perry »

« Reply #23 on: August 17, 2014, 12:07 »
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hello, i won't go into the photos, as u already have the honest verdict by now.
shadysue, goofy, ... more or less told u like it is, and pointed u in the right direction.
instead of pretending all is fair n flowery (no pun intended)...

i don't know how many times one of the big guys here (SJLocke) repeated like a scratched vinyl..
" xx xx x xx xx  .. you pick the easiest type of pictures to shoot, ..the ones that are flooded in all sites", or words to that effect. which is the most frank reality-check everyone should say to all new person wanting 2 get in on this S&M business of ms

to do well , u must be able 2 provide sellable images... not images that every (to quote perry ) gwc can make. nothing wrong with sending flowers or birds or what is flooded in the ms, which is more or less every thing lncluding the kitchen sink, ... so long as what u have is unique or difficult to get.
of course, u have 2 be able 2 know ur camera so that what u shoot requires no post-processing
other than to color correct, remove fringe, locally reduce noise or sensor dust in large area where such pita are prone, ...  but not to correct bad photography, focusing, etc.
iow, the less post-processing the better, as ur images will be sparkling and clean and sharp.
therefore, when viewed on a page with other similars, it will stand out and u get chosen for downloads.

as for what u show us here, ... a soft rejection NO . this is not what u want .
the best thing 2 do is to go to each site on the right of this page here ------->>>
and look at the BEST SELLERS .
then go out and make those kinds of images.

it won't guarantee u will get sales, as many of these are aleady been on page one forever.
and ur new work will be found on pg.... (not page 1 ) ;)

but if u work with lesser known agencies, maybe there, u will be able 2 practise until u r ready
for ss, is, ...

then u better get ur anti-depressant , @nal-alcohol  ;D ;D ;D or whatever u need
n get ready 4 hoop-jumping  ;)
 :D :D :D :D :D :D

or u can just be happy with ur day job, even if it is as boring as flipping burgers (it pay more 4 sure)
or squeegee windows at the lights

then just enjoy what u like 2 shoot... dogs, cats, flowers, pretty girls,
n just give the finger 2 all the hoop jumping  8)
« Last Edit: August 17, 2014, 12:17 by etudiante_rapide »

PaulieWalnuts

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« Reply #24 on: August 17, 2014, 12:18 »
0
Funny these are pretty similar to the stuff I was shooting for fun before I decided to start doing stock in 2007.

I'd suggest learning what buyers want. Flowers are difficult to sell as stock because they're readily available in just about everyone's yard. Meaning, you have a billion competitors so they must be spectacular or unique and these three pictures really aren't either. Even though you used a DSLR these could have been taken with an iPhone. If this is the kind of stuff you like to shoot you may want to try POD print sites like Zazzle. Otherwise you're going to need to adjust what you shoot to what's in demand with buyers. I think Istock has/had an area that showed the top sellers by week, month, etc. and also a "needs" list so do a search for it and that should give you an idea of what to shoot if you want to sell.

You asked for a critique so...

  • Decent colors but too much empty space. Should have more flowers equally filling in space. I'm immediately drawn to the green leaf with the piece of junk on it. I'd either reshoot without it or Photoshop out the distractions. And these flowers are already dying so there's a bit much dead brown stuff for me. If you're going to do flowers they should be beautiful and the center of attention.
  • This one doesn't do anything for me. The main object is too blended in with the rest of the image. I don't think there's anything to fix this except maybe reshooting it without the object and sell it as a background
  • Again, flowers are wilted and getting brown edges. I realize coneflowers sag but these are looking shriveled. I'm immediately drawn to the top left flower that's partially covering your main subject which is distracting.

They're not bad but even if you improved them I don't think they would sell well, or at all, as stock. If you reshot them without the problems they may do okay on one of the POD sites. I'd suggest doing a search on some of the sites to see what's there and compare yours to see how they stack up.

The point of the application is to show you know how to use a camera and you also know stock photography. These three show you somewhat know how to use a camera and don't understand stock. Maybe Istock has loosened its requirements but I don't think stuff like this will get you approved.




 

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