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Author Topic: Outdoor Lighting- Photo Sample of Rejected Pic  (Read 6244 times)

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tab62

« on: September 20, 2012, 21:04 »
0
Hi MSGer's,

Here is one photo that was rejected due to poor lighting- I used natural during the golden hours while out in the field.

http://i1053.photobucket.com/albums/s470/tigerpix2011/PoorLighting01_zpsbff084a1.jpg

Any comments would be highly appreciated...

Thanks.

Tom


ruxpriencdiam

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  • Location. Third stone from the sun
« Reply #1 on: September 20, 2012, 21:16 »
0
I see blown areas on the shirt and her forehead and the shadows dont help either.

A slightly larger picture would be better to see more detail.

traveler1116

« Reply #2 on: September 20, 2012, 21:16 »
0
Use a reflector.

« Reply #3 on: September 20, 2012, 22:32 »
+1
As mentioned before using a reflector to the left of the model would have helped to lighten up the dark areas of the body.

Screw the "golden hour" as long as you have direct sunlight creating harsh shadows it's not much better than straight sunlight at noon for example.

Without some additional light (strobes or reflector) it's pretty much impossible to shoot this nicely. Actually if the sky was somewhat overcast it would help a lot.

You need to find a reflective material that bounces plenty of light back, you might get away with an old white bed sheet - no need to actually buy a reflector.

With more light at hand, exposure times will be shorter and the highlights that were blown out before should be ok then.

If you want to use this image and compete (successfully) in stock photography you have to crank your game a bit.

The location (or better background) looks quite busy and is rather distracting. You should shoot it at a much lower aperture than the 7.1 you used in order to throw the background more out of focus.

There are more "issues" with the clothing, props and concept if you want to talk about it let me know.

« Reply #4 on: September 21, 2012, 01:09 »
+2
thanks for uploading the pick. 

I would have rotated the model another 45 degrees so the sun is coming from her back.  Her face is then in the shadows and you will have a nice rim light from the sun and use a reflector of some sort to brighten up her face.  Alternatively there might be some shade somewhere close that you can shoot in.  Shoot just on the edge of the shade (her standing in it) and throw some light on her with a reflector again.

If you look at your model now it's super dark on her pants (to the point of no detail totally black) and super bright on her forehead (to the point of being blown out) .. that's too much contrast.

« Reply #5 on: September 21, 2012, 02:27 »
+1
Thanks for posting and the replies so far, I like to see the constructive ideas on how to improve photos.

« Reply #6 on: September 21, 2012, 03:04 »
0
Thanks for posting and the replies so far, I like to see the constructive ideas on how to improve photos.


agreed, I think we can all learn something for others suggestions.

tab62

« Reply #7 on: September 21, 2012, 09:44 »
0
Thank you all! This is very helpful tips!


T

« Reply #8 on: September 21, 2012, 09:55 »
0
Lighting aside, I don't understand the pose (+ the grip of the bucket) and the concept of this shot at all (I would reject this for low commercial value too)

Better light, lose the sunglasses, change the plastic bucket to a wicker basket full of harvested stuff etc.

« Reply #9 on: September 21, 2012, 10:15 »
+3
Even on a bright overcast day, a reflector makes a huge difference. As an example, here's a crop from a test shot on a bright overcast day with and without a reflector. In this case it was one of the large circular ones, but I also have a few light panels which are great if you need a larger scrim or reflector surface. Click on the thumbnail for a larger version.



You can see tons of video tutorials on this sort of thing - see
here
and
here
and here for a couple of examples.

« Reply #10 on: September 21, 2012, 10:33 »
0
Great Post JoAnn.  Did you use the gold side?  Sometimes when I use gold it is terribly yellow.  You sure can't beat a good example like your before and after.  The skin is softer and healthier, the eyes are brighter.  The shadows aren't terribly harsh in the first shot, but they sure add age and even a few pounds.  No hint of colour in the eyes - and the shadows from the brow are close to causing the "racoon eyes" that are so attractive with overhead light. 

So who was holding the reflector?

Another great thing about the 5 in 1 reflectors is that you can take the outer casing off and use the inside as a scrim to reduce light, or to fire a flash through.  I need to invest in a rig that won't blow over.  (Maybe those C stands?)  I can't use reflectors without help, it's ALWAYS windy on the prairies.

« Reply #11 on: September 21, 2012, 10:41 »
0
Agree with others - golden hour or not, you've got harsh light coming from one side that needs to be tempered by an external source on the left.

« Reply #12 on: September 21, 2012, 10:42 »
0
Here is my outdoor location set up. Total control, except for the freaking WIND!  >:(

OX
...Softbox sailer.

« Reply #13 on: September 21, 2012, 11:12 »
0
Great Post JoAnn.  Did you use the gold side?  Sometimes when I use gold it is terribly yellow.  You sure can't beat a good example like your before and after.  The skin is softer and healthier, the eyes are brighter.  The shadows aren't terribly harsh in the first shot, but they sure add age and even a few pounds.  No hint of colour in the eyes - and the shadows from the brow are close to causing the "racoon eyes" that are so attractive with overhead light. 

So who was holding the reflector?

Another great thing about the 5 in 1 reflectors is that you can take the outer casing off and use the inside as a scrim to reduce light, or to fire a flash through.  I need to invest in a rig that won't blow over.  (Maybe those C stands?)  I can't use reflectors without help, it's ALWAYS windy on the prairies.

In this case, the reflector was on a cooperative shrub in front of me :) I have stands and sand bags (or those water filled plastic weight bags with hooks) so I can use both circular reflectors or the light panels without an assistant (which I almost never have).

It was the gold/silver stripe cover in this case. I like the light from that a lot when you want a little warmth but not as much as the gold.

« Reply #14 on: October 24, 2012, 16:20 »
0
You can use a photo stand with an arm for the reflector too.
I sometimes cheat and use the reflector filter from Nik in post when I've been out on the road shooting without my entire kit. It helps but nothing beats the real thing.  8)

« Reply #15 on: October 25, 2012, 08:41 »
0
In this case, a on camera flash as a fill will do the trick as well.

« Reply #16 on: January 08, 2013, 17:06 »
0
Hi MSGer's,

Here is one photo that was rejected due to poor lighting- I used natural during the golden hours while out in the field.

http://i1053.photobucket.com/albums/s470/tigerpix2011/PoorLighting01_zpsbff084a1.jpg

Any comments would be highly appreciated...

Thanks.

Tom


Not too be too nit picky, I would try for a different background The line passes through the top of her head is distracting. Right now it looks like a snap shot. As far as the lighting you can use a reflector or a large scrim to soften the suns direct light. It would have cut down the contrast a great deal. and still let you keep the shallow depth of field that you were looking for.

Personally I would have done this shot in the morning when the sun was little softer and the plants would not have the glare of the sun upon them

tab62

« Reply #17 on: January 08, 2013, 17:15 »
0
I am now the proud owner of 5 in 1 reflector kit that includes silver and gold. Plus some nice new portable softboxes with strobes- I am so ready next time!

« Reply #18 on: January 08, 2013, 17:20 »
0
I am now the proud owner of 5 in 1 reflector kit that includes silver and gold. Plus some nice new portable softboxes with strobes- I am so ready next time!

Remember it is not the equipment that makes the photograph, it is the time and the thought of the photographer that makes the photograph. Before you even think of shooting at a location for a set piece visit the location at various times of the day and time year to when is the best time to proceed with the photography.


 

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