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Author Topic: Tear me apart  (Read 9249 times)

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« on: January 26, 2008, 10:45 »
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OK, I have been dead in the water on sales for the following series of images:



The one I provided is the only one of the series that has a sale.  I have already been told that the images are "cute" but are "inanimate".  I should have photographed them with a briefcase or sitting at a desk.  I am going to redo the series, but before I do, I want to hear what you really HATE about the images.  I just installed a new background support, wooden floor, and seamless paper backgrounds in my studio, so the wrinkled black material on the floor will also be gone.  I am looking for some things that just aren't hitting me in the face.  I think this is worth reshooting, I just want to make sure that I maximize my efforts.  Thanks for your help!  Please be BRUTAL!  I can take it.   :-X
« Last Edit: January 26, 2008, 12:51 by photojay »


« Reply #1 on: January 26, 2008, 11:26 »
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First off, she is a very cute model.

Just my opinion, but I would rather see it with a white background (since the suit is already dark).

I also agree that it would probably be better if she was doesn't something "businessy", such as talking on a phone, holding a briefcase, reading documents, etc.  Maybe also have her give you a serious business face.

Good luck.

« Reply #2 on: January 26, 2008, 11:28 »
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There's nothing that I hate, but ...

A white background would make the image more versatile for a designer. Adding a prop or two (briefcase, newspaper, lollipop, lunchbox, ...) would certainly enhance what you are trying to say - I'm guessing that you're going for some sort of "businesswoman feeling out of place" theme. It might be better if she wasn't smiling - perhaps an expression of exasperation or frustration might work.

« Reply #3 on: January 26, 2008, 12:35 »
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Sorry, I should have given sort of a theme.  Also, if you click the image, it should bring up other images from this series so you can see that I actually shot all four of my kids (including my son) in my suit.

The theme I was going for is to illustrate 1) younger worker pool 2) young-hip mentality about marketing 3) young businesses in general.

Basically, the youth of up and coming businesses that have a professional appearance and room to grow into their respective market.

« Reply #4 on: January 26, 2008, 12:42 »
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White, white, white background for sure. And different expressions: curiosity, fear, hate, shock, surprise, etc. Maybe some glasses, computer, or other props as suggested above. Great looking model.

« Reply #5 on: January 26, 2008, 17:47 »
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Photojay,

This one has sold probably because there is something going on in the image and it is the most eye catching one of your series. I am not sure if a white background will change things much as creating a concept. The idea is good, although not quite sure about the daddy suit for the kids. if your idea was "1) younger worker pool 2) young-hip mentality about marketing 3) young businesses in general" than why the oversize suit ?
The other posts are right on the money. you should put your kids in suits that fit and in business situations. That would be closer to your original thought and would certainly sell well.
Tell me, is that your son crying ? I could never take pictures of my son crying. I would be too busy comforting him...
Hope this helps

Paul M

« Reply #6 on: January 26, 2008, 18:09 »
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I'll just say guess it's the background.  You have to work too hard to figure out what it is.

I say, put them in your white leisure suit and spats on black.

As well, I don't think it illustrates any of the three themes you mentioned.

« Reply #7 on: January 26, 2008, 18:18 »
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Tell me, is that your son crying ? I could never take pictures of my son crying. I would be too busy comforting him...

Yes, he was crying.  I punched him in the gut and told him to man up...lol :o  (just kidding)

My kids are actually great actors.  I have always hated wading through tons of images of happy people on the MS sites, so I have made it my mission to catch people being mad, sad, or lonely in a real way.  Not some skinny model with a forced sad look on her face. 

I still do the smiley faces, but they are becoming less and less.  Funny thing is that I love to laugh.  I am a clown, by nature, so these images are kind of a way for me to get out of my comfort zone and push my limits. 

StockXpert just rejected 2 of those three images, BTW, for poor lighting.  I guess there needs to be a "notes to the reviewer section" like there is in SS so I can explain that the lighting was created on purpose to add to the somber mood and not an accidental flop.  I created the one with more light on his face because I figured that some stock sites wouldn't get the whole "mood lighting"

Thanks for the input, all.  I appreciate it. 

« Reply #8 on: January 26, 2008, 18:26 »
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StockXpert just rejected 2 of those three images, BTW, for poor lighting.  I guess there needs to be a "notes to the reviewer section" like there is in SS so I can explain that the lighting was created on purpose to add to the somber mood and not an accidental flop.  I created the one with more light on his face because I figured that some stock sites wouldn't get the whole "mood lighting"

People say this at times, but I don't get why you'd have to explain.  Either the image works for the reviewer or not.  Intentional or accidental, if it doesn't work, it doesn't.

Jor43

« Reply #9 on: January 26, 2008, 18:42 »
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Greetings
I think it is a beautiful photo and the light is right.  I'm a graphic designer and IMHO I like to use photos with a white background.  They are easier to use and I can put the subject anywhere in a page (like in an ad) or change the background to any color I need.
Anyway I still I thinking it is a beautiful photo

« Reply #10 on: January 26, 2008, 20:41 »
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StockXpert just rejected 2 of those three images, BTW, for poor lighting.  I guess there needs to be a "notes to the reviewer section" like there is in SS so I can explain that the lighting was created on purpose to add to the somber mood and not an accidental flop.  I created the one with more light on his face because I figured that some stock sites wouldn't get the whole "mood lighting"


People say this at times, but I don't get why you'd have to explain.  Either the image works for the reviewer or not.  Intentional or accidental, if it doesn't work, it doesn't.


Here is one of the images that we are speaking of:



The reason I photographed him under this light is because it makes his ear look red, darkens the front of his face, while bringing the tears dripping from both eyes right off his cheeks with the side lighting.  It's harsh light rather than the normal soft lighting you see with the  ;D portraits.  If they said: too noisy or bad composition, I could take that rejection, but StockXpert said: bad lighting.  I disagree, and (without a reason supplied to the reviewer) I think the Istock reviewer did, too. 

But, I do agree that there shouldn't HAVE to be an explaination for why you used a certain lighting.  Unfortunately, some reviewers should have more experience as photographers before they are allowed to be reviewers.  I only have 3 years as a photographer and (me being the way I am) I would stress out too much about reviewing someone elses work, regardless of the stringent guidelines that may be set forth by the admins.  I just don't think I have the experience...yet.

PaulieWalnuts

  • On the Wrong Side of the Business
« Reply #11 on: January 26, 2008, 21:32 »
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First photo is cute but it doesn't say anything to me. It seems mismatched. Her expression feels like "I'm embarrased to be doing this". She's also directly looking at the camera which just isn't working for this image. As others have said it would be more time consuming to extract her from the background, unless the designer was already using a dark background. Go with white.

Image of the boy is closer to having a stronger presence to it.

« Reply #12 on: January 27, 2008, 07:44 »
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First photo is cute but it doesn't say anything to me. It seems mismatched. Her expression feels like "I'm embarrased to be doing this". She's also directly looking at the camera which just isn't working for this image. As others have said it would be more time consuming to extract her from the background, unless the designer was already using a dark background. Go with white.

Image of the boy is closer to having a stronger presence to it.

THANKS!  your opininion is well noted.  I can definitely see what you are seeing.

« Reply #13 on: January 27, 2008, 11:45 »
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I find the boy's ear very distracting - cropping to remove 1/2 or 2/3 of it might improve the shot.

« Reply #14 on: January 27, 2008, 18:54 »
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You asked for it, so here goes.  The StockXpert reviewer was right on, the picture of the boy crying is one of the worst lit images I have ever seen offered for sale.  If you are going to shoot low key then shoot low key don't mix low key and high key lighting.  The right side of his face is totally burned out as is his right shoulder.  The left side of his face is way too dark.  Evening up the lighting ratios a little would allow the right side to still be brighter than the left and would also open up the shadow on the left side of his face so we can see that he has 2 eyes.  Did you shoot a close up of just the eye and the tear?

As for the girl in the oversize clothes, photograph her doing everything you can think of with any kind of prop you can think of (playing a musical instrument, reflected in a mirror, on a bicycle, putting on makeup . . .).  Also photograph her from as many different positions (high, low, front, back, left, right, inside, outside . . . ) as you can think of.  Get her input, I bet she will think of things that you won't.

« Reply #15 on: January 28, 2008, 09:01 »
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You asked for it, so here goes.  The StockXpert reviewer was right on, the picture of the boy crying is one of the worst lit images I have ever seen offered for sale.  If you are going to shoot low key then shoot low key don't mix low key and high key lighting.  The right side of his face is totally burned out as is his right shoulder.  The left side of his face is way too dark.  Evening up the lighting ratios a little would allow the right side to still be brighter than the left and would also open up the shadow on the left side of his face so we can see that he has 2 eyes.  Did you shoot a close up of just the eye and the tear?

As for the girl in the oversize clothes, photograph her doing everything you can think of with any kind of prop you can think of (playing a musical instrument, reflected in a mirror, on a bicycle, putting on makeup . . .).  Also photograph her from as many different positions (high, low, front, back, left, right, inside, outside . . . ) as you can think of.  Get her input, I bet she will think of things that you won't.

I see what you are saying.  I could have dialed down the light from the left side a bit to preserve the details (almost like the strength of the light from the right side), and bounced a little bit of light up into his face to bring that left eye out of the shadow so much.  Thanks for the critique! 

I am planning a ton of shots for the "big suit" on a white background.  I will definitely let her experiment a bit.  Thanks again.

« Reply #16 on: January 28, 2008, 13:14 »
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Great shot but please isolate on white if you have dark clothes! How can a designer isolate your shots with black on black??? Think! ;-) Isolation works on contrast.
As a side note: I would never use black since all texture and folds drown in there, and if you want to pop it up... there comes the :o noise devil :o

Use gray! (it goes with any color scheme on a web page or folder, and the skin as only colored area gets the focus - think designer!).

:D   :'(
« Last Edit: January 28, 2008, 13:36 by FlemishDreams »

« Reply #17 on: January 28, 2008, 17:27 »
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I am finding that my black background is not a designer's friend :P.  I will definitely be rolling out my roll of white seamless paper alot more often for these types of images.  Thanks for the info on the grays.  I never thought about that POV.  I always think "curb appeal" at thumbnail size and grays seem to be sooo bland. 

« Reply #18 on: October 24, 2012, 16:15 »
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Your kids are cute! Keep trying. I like the girl in the oversized suit but definitely white background. Post your new ones for us to see!
 8)

ShadySue

« Reply #19 on: October 24, 2012, 16:28 »
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Your kids are cute! Keep trying. I like the girl in the oversized suit but definitely white background. Post your new ones for us to see!
 8)
You'll be lucky. The OP was 'last active' here in March 2008!

« Reply #20 on: January 08, 2013, 07:57 »
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Darn. I have to make me some kids. Saves the hazzle with adult models :D

« Reply #21 on: January 08, 2013, 08:01 »
+2
^^^ Ancient thread alert.

lisafx

« Reply #22 on: January 08, 2013, 11:25 »
+2
^^ Seriously!!  I just wasted time reading this and thinking about this guy's ancient issue, before seeing the date. 

If you are going to dredge up a 4 or 5 year old thread, please post an old thread alert in the FIRST post responding to it. 

Or better yet, let sleeping dogs lie.  I am certain the OP would have figured out this problem by now.   ::) :P

Poncke

« Reply #23 on: January 08, 2013, 12:48 »
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^^^ Ancient thread alert.
Yeah, its not old, but ancient, this one. LOL


 

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